Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Ciao a tutti. Benvenuti.
Marco: Marco here. Upper intermediate season 1, Lesson #6. Every week, it’s the Same Old Thing with You in Italy. Hello and welcome to italianpod101.com, the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn Italian.
Consuelo: I am Consuelo and thanks again for being here with us for this upper intermediate season 1 lesson.
Marco: In today’s class, we are continuing to focus on the preposition Di and its usage.
Consuelo: This conversation takes place on the street.
Marco: And it’s between Filippo, Claudia and Irene.
Consuelo: They will be speaking informal Italian.
Marco: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Filippo: Bene, gli altri sono già al ristorante. Andiamo?
Claudia: Sì dai, andiamo che di sabato c'è un traffico...
Irene: Ehi, aspettatemi!
Claudia: In effetti siamo proprio in ritardo.
Filippo: Non vi preoccupate, non prendo la strada principale, conosco una scorciatoia.
Irene: Davvero? Io non mi fido di te!
Filippo: Claudia, ma tua sorella è sempre così acida?
Irene: Eh dai Pippo, scherzavo, che permaloso!
Filippo: Dobbiamo pure fare benzina!
Claudia: Perfetto!
Irene: Quindi ai ragazzi che ci aspettano diremo che è stata colpa tua!
Marco: Let’s here it slowly now.
Filippo: Bene, gli altri sono già al ristorante. Andiamo?
Claudia: Sì dai, andiamo che di sabato c'è un traffico...
Irene: Ehi, aspettatemi!
Claudia: In effetti siamo proprio in ritardo.
Filippo: Non vi preoccupate, non prendo la strada principale, conosco una scorciatoia.
Irene: Davvero? Io non mi fido di te!
Filippo: Claudia, ma tua sorella è sempre così acida?
Irene: Eh dai Pippo, scherzavo, che permaloso!
Filippo: Dobbiamo pure fare benzina!
Claudia: Perfetto!
Irene: Quindi ai ragazzi che ci aspettano diremo che è stata colpa tua!
Marco: And now, with the translation.
Filippo: Bene, gli altri sono già al ristorante. Andiamo?
Filippo: Well, the others are already at the restaurant. Shall we go?
Claudia: Sì dai, andiamo che di sabato c'è un traffico...
Claudia: Yes, come on, let's go as there's a lot of traffic on Saturdays…
Irene: Ehi, aspettatemi!
Irene: Hey, wait for me!
Claudia: In effetti siamo proprio in ritardo.
Claudia: Actually, we are really late.
Filippo: Non vi preoccupate, non prendo la strada principale, conosco una scorciatoia.
Filippo: Don't worry. I'm not taking the main street; I know a shortcut.
Irene: Davvero? Io non mi fido di te!
Irene: Really? I don't trust you!
Filippo: Claudia, ma tua sorella è sempre così acida?
Filippo: Claudia, is your sister always so sour?
Irene: Eh dai Pippo, scherzavo, che permaloso!
Irene: Come on, Pippo, I was kidding; how touchy!
Filippo: Dobbiamo pure fare benzina!
Filippo: We also have to gas up the car!
Claudia: Perfetto!
Claudia: Perfect!
Irene: Quindi ai ragazzi che ci aspettano diremo che è stata colpa tua!
Irene: So we'll tell the guys who are waiting for us that it was your fault!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: Okay Consuelo, it’s clear they are not fighting but why does Filippo tell Irene she is sour?!
Consuelo: Sei acido/acida, you usually say it to someone who is acting and bit nervous complaining about everything but in this case, Filippo says it as a joke.
Marco: Ah that’s why Irene doesn’t get angry.
Consuelo: Yep.
Marco: As always, they are late because of the girls but Filippo also adds to fill up on gas. Can you say that again in Italian please?
Consuelo: That’s fare benzina.Benzina is petrol or gas. And we use the verb fare.
Marco: The verb to do. Is gas expensive in Italy?
Consuelo: Yes it is but you can often find cheaper gas in the huge superstores like the French Carrefour.
Marco: How can I find these superstores?
Consuelo: Oh it’s very easy outside of main cities wherever you see tons of guys lining up.
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is
Consuelo: Traffico.
Marco: Traffic.
Consuelo: Traffico. Traffico
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: In effetti.
Marco: Actually, indeed, in fact.
Consuelo: In effetti. In effetti.
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Principale.
Marco: Main, principal, first.
Consuelo: Principale. Principale.
Marco: The next word is
Consuelo: Acido.
Marco: Acid.
Consuelo: Acido. Acido.
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Scherzare.
Marco: To joke, make fun of.
Consuelo: Scherzare. Scherzare
Marco: Next we have
Consuelo: Permaloso.
Marco: Touchy, ticklish.
Consuelo: Permaloso. Permaloso
Marco: And today’s last word is
Consuelo: Benzina.
Marco: Gas, petrol.
Consuelo: Benzina. Benzina.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: So Consuela, what expression are we studying today?
Consuelo: Today, we are studying the expression “essere in ritardo”.
Marco: I am sure we already covered this expression or something similar, but it’s always good to see it again since it’s a bit tricky.
Consuelo: You are right. In Italian, we have two ways of saying to be late.
Marco: Let’s start with essere in ritardo, to be late.
Consuelo: Scusa, sono in ritardo. Sorry, I am late.
Marco: You can also use tardi right?
Consuelo: Yes, as in fare tardi, with tardi, we use the verb fare. Oggi faccio tardi, mi dispiace.
Marco: Today I will be late, I am sorry. Fare tardi is more informal.
Consuelo: So please remember. essere in ritardo and fare tardi.
Marco: Be sure not to confuse them.
Consuelo: Yes. If you say essere in tardi it doesn’t make any sense.
Marco: Thank you Consuela. This was very helpful.
Consuelo: Especially for all those listeners who are always late.
Marco: Right.

Lesson focus

Consuelo: Let’s take a look at today’s grammar point.
Marco: In today’s lesson, we continue focusing on the preposition Di and its usages.
Consuelo: In the last lesson, we gave you a series of usages for the preposition Di.
Marco: In this lesson, we go on with that list starting from the first Di we heard in the dialogue, di sabato.
Consuelo: In this and many cases, Di can be used to indicate time, thus having a temporal value.
Marco: Using it with weekdays, it has the meaning of ogni, which means every. Just as we have heard Claudia saying di sabato c’è un traffico.
Consuelo: There is a lot of traffic on Saturdays. Another example: di domenica non si lavora.
Marco: We don’t work on Sundays.
Consuelo: Di venerdì vado sempre al mercato.
Marco: I always go to the market on Fridays.
Consuelo: Di is also used in some common adverbial expressions like di solito, meaning often and di recente, meaning recently.
Marco: Di tanto in tanto, meaning sometimes.
Consuelo: When Di as allocative value, you can find it in expressions like fuori di qui.
Marco: Out of here.
Consuelo: Or andiamo di là.
Marco: Let’s go there.
Consuelo: When articulated, the preposition Di also has the function of partitive article.
Marco: That in English is some.
Consuelo: Vorrei dell’acqua gassata.
Marco: I’d like some sparkling water.
Consuelo: Hai del sale?
Marco: Have you got some salt?
Consuelo: Del formaggio fresco, per favore.
Marco: Some fresh cheese please.
Consuelo: Please remember these prepositional expressions: a destra di
Marco: At the right of.
Consuelo: Invece di
Marco: Instead of.
Consuelo: Prima di
Marco: Before.
Consuelo: Prego, dopo di Lei
Marco: Go ahead, after you.
Consuelo: And sopra di noi
Marco: Above us.
Consuelo: Lastly you can find Di in many verb constructions such as fidarsi di as we heard in the dialogue.
Marco: To trust in.
Consuelo: Ridere di
Marco: To laugh at.
Consuelo: Soffrire di
Marco: To suffer of or to suffer for.

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today.
Consuelo: Listeners, can you list out Italian TV shows, movies or songs?
Marco: How about friends and loved ones? Conversations in Italian.
Consuelo: If you want to know what’s going on, we have a tool to help.
Marco: Line by line audio.
Consuelo: Listen to the lesson conversations line by line and learn to understand natural Italian fast.
Marco: It’s simple really.
Consuelo: With a click of a button, listen to each line of the conversation.
Marco: Listen again and again and tune your ear to natural Italian.
Consuelo: Rapidly understand natural Italian with this powerful tool.
Marco: Find this feature on the lesson page under premium member resources at italianpod101.com
Consuelo: Ciao, alla prossima lezione.

5 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Have you ever taken a shortcut in Italy?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 01:59 AM
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Hi Angela,

I think that's a typo. We'll fix it ASAP.


"often" would be "spesso".


Thanks for pointing that out!


Team ItalianPod101.com

Angela
Friday at 10:12 AM
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Does the 'grammer" really mean to say "... di solito ("often") ... ".


I understand 'di solito' to mean "usually", and my (Cassell's) dictionary says the same thing.


Is "often" an additional meaning, or a typo?


Grazie.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 12:24 PM
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Buongiorno Liza,


La puoi trovare qui: https://www.italianpod101.com/learningcenter/reference/dictionary/scorciatoia

Please find and select it here: https://www.italianpod101.com/learningcenter/reference/dictionary/scorciatoia


Thank you,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Liza
Thursday at 02:19 AM
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Ho notato che la parolla " scorciatoia" non e' incluso nel vocabulario. Come incluire nel mio Wordbank?