Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Buongiorno a tutti. Ben tornati.
Marco: Marco here. Upper intermediate season 1, Lesson #5. I Know Not of What You Speak in Italian.
Consuelo: Hello everyone. I am Consuelo and welcome to italianpod101.com.
Marco: With us, you will learn to speak Italian with fun and effective lessons.
Consuelo: We also provide you with cultural insights
Marco: And tips you won’t find in a textbook. In today’s class, we will focus on the preposition d and its usage.
Consuelo: This conversation takes place at Irene and Claudia’s place.
Marco: And it’s between Filippo, Claudia and Irene.
Consuelo: They will be speaking informal Italian.
Marco: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
(doorbell sound)
Irene: Deve essere Filippo, ma perché vuole entrare in casa? Ha detto che aspettava fuori, meno male abbiamo pulito oggi...
(she opens the door)
Irene: Ciao Pippo, entra! Ma che ci fai qui?
Filippo: Non so se hai notato, ma fuori piove di brutto! Non volevo aspettarvi da solo in macchina.
Irene: Sì hai fatto bene, ma come, piove!? Oh no, mi devo cambiare le scarpe adesso, se piove mi metto gli stivali!
Filippo: Basta che ti sbrighi, sto morendo di fame! Poi è inutile che ti fai bella stasera, Mirco non viene.
Irene: Cosa? Davvero? E perché?
Filippo: E che ne so! Tua sorella è pronta?
Claudia: Sì, sono qui al computer!
Marco: Let’s here it slowly now.
(doorbell sound)
Irene: Deve essere Filippo, ma perché vuole entrare in casa? Ha detto che aspettava fuori, meno male abbiamo pulito oggi...
(she opens the door)
Irene: Ciao Pippo, entra! Ma che ci fai qui?
Filippo: Non so se hai notato, ma fuori piove di brutto! Non volevo aspettarvi da solo in macchina.
Irene: Sì hai fatto bene, ma come, piove!? Oh no, mi devo cambiare le scarpe adesso, se piove mi metto gli stivali!
Filippo: Basta che ti sbrighi, sto morendo di fame! Poi è inutile che ti fai bella stasera, Mirco non viene.
Irene: Cosa? Davvero? E perché?
Filippo: E che ne so! Tua sorella è pronta?
Claudia: Sì, sono qui al computer!
Marco: And now, with the translation.
(doorbell sound)
Irene: Deve essere Filippo, ma perché vuole entrare in casa? Ha detto che aspettava fuori, meno male abbiamo pulito oggi...
Irene: It might be Filippo, but why does he want to get in? He said he would wait outside. Thank goodness we cleaned today...
(she opens the door)
Irene: Ciao Pippo, entra! Ma che ci fai qui?
Irene: Hi, Pippo, come in! What are you doing here?
Filippo: Non so se hai notato, ma fuori piove di brutto! Non volevo aspettarvi da solo in macchina.
Filippo: I don't know whether you noticed, but it's raining like crazy outside! I didn't want to wait for you alone in my car.
Irene: Sì hai fatto bene, ma come, piove!? Oh no, mi devo cambiare le scarpe adesso, se piove mi metto gli stivali!
Irene: Yes, you did the right thing, but how come it's raining? Oh no, I have to change shoes now. If it's raining, I'll put on the boots!
Filippo: Basta che ti sbrighi, sto morendo di fame! Poi è inutile che ti fai bella stasera, Mirco non viene.
Filippo: As long as you hurry up; I'm starving! And it's of no use that you dress up tonight; Mirco is not coming.
Irene: Cosa? Davvero? E perché?
Irene: What? Really? Why?
Filippo: E che ne so! Tua sorella è pronta?
Filippo: I don't know! Is your sister ready?
Claudia: Sì, sono qui al computer!
Claudia: Yes, I'm here at the computer!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: Hey Consuelo, am I wrong or did Irene called Filippo using the name Pippo?
Consuelo: Oh true. That’s a nickname usually used for guys whose name is Filippo.
Marco: Ah I see, a nick name. I have a friend called Luigi but everybody calls him Gigi.
Consuelo: That’s another common nick name. For Francesco and Francesca, we use Checco or Checca.
Marco: I have heard of that and also Claudia sometimes calls her sister Ire instead of Irene in her dialogues.
Consuelo: Right. Good guess. But tell me, did you hear when Irene said meno male abbiamo pulito oggi?
Marco: Oh yes. Why is she so worried about cleaning?
Consuelo: Because when a person comes to your house in Italy, it must be all clean and sparkling.
Marco: Oh really? even between friends?
Consuelo: Sure.
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Oh that’s a nice habit. Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is
Consuelo: Entrare.
Marco: To go in, come in, enter
Consuelo: Entrare. Entrare.
Marco: Next we have
Consuelo: Pulire.
Marco: To clean.
Consuelo: Pulire. Pulire.
Marco: And the next word is
Consuelo: Notare.
Marco: To notice, to realize.
Consuelo: Notare. Notare.
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Mettersi.
Marco: To put on.
Consuelo: Mettersi. Mettersi.
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Stivale.
Marco: Boot.
Consuelo: Stivale. Stivale.
Marco: The next word is
Consuelo: Inutile.
Marco: Unnecessary, useless.
Consuelo: Inutile. Inutile.
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Stasera.
Marco: Tonight.
Consuelo: Stasera. Stasera.
Marco: And today’s last word is
Consuelo: Qui.
Marco: Here.
Consuelo: Qui. Qui.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Consuelo, what expression are we studying today?
Consuelo: The Italian expression “basta che”.
Marco: As long as, provided that.
Consuelo: The word basta is used in Italian with many different meanings.
Marco: But in this case, when it is combined with che it is commonly translated into as long as.
Consuelo: Basta che is usually followed by a congiuntivo.
Marco: The subjunctive mood. Let’s hear an example using basta che plus congiuntivo.
Consuelo: Sure referring to voi: bene, potete giocare qui, basta che non rompiate niente.
Marco: Meaning: well, you can play here as long as you don’t break anything. This phrase can probably be said to a bunch of kids.
Consuelo: That’s exactly what I was thinking. So rompiate is the subjunctive for the verb rompere, meaning to break inflected to its voi form.
Marco: Sometimes the congiuntivo can be confused with the indicativo presente, the present tense.
Consuelo: That’s true. Let’s take for example the phrase: Hey Marco, allora quando partiamo? meaning, hey Marco, when do we leave?
Marco: I can answer by saying: non lo so, ma basta che andiamo in vacanza. Meaning I don’t know as long as we go on holiday.
Consuelo: Here the subjunctive of the verb andare, meaning to go, has the same form as the present tense: noi andiamo.
Marco: It happens also in the dialogue when Filippo says basta che ti sbrighi.
Consuelo: Che tu ti sbrighi is subjunctive. And here again, we have the same form of the present tense, but if it was referred to voi, the right verb to use should have been
Marco: Basta che vi sbrighiate.
Consuelo: Perfetto Marco. Basta che vi sbrighiate. Not to be confused with basta che vi sbrigate, at the present indicative.

Lesson focus

Consuelo: Let’s take a look at today’s grammar point.
Marco: In today’s lesson, we will focus on the preposition Di, meaning of.
Consuelo: With this lesson, we are starting a series of lessons that will analyze Italian proper prepositions.
Marco: Wait a minute! What are proper prepositions?
Consuelo: Italian proper prepositions can be simple. Di, A, Da, In, Con, Su, Per, Tra and Fra, or articulated.
Marco: They are articulated when...
Consuelo: When the preposition is followed by a definite article. The preposition contracts to form one word, as in Del, Al, Nel and Sul.
Marco: In the case of the preposition Di, meaning of, the articulated forms are
Consuelo: Del, Dello, Dell with apostrophe, Dei, Degli, Della and Delle.
Marco: The most challenging part is to understand when to use this common preposition.
Consuelo: We now will give you a list of all the cases when the preposition Di is used.
Marco: Okay listeners, let’s start.
Consuelo: Di is used to indicate possession: la figlia di Maria.
Marco: Maria’s daughter. Or la giacca di Consuelo.
Consuelo: Ah, Consuelo’s jacket.
Marco: Di is also used as specified in material. For example, a wool sweater is
Consuelo: Un maglione di lana.
Marco: To specify the measure.
Consuelo: Una montagna di 1500 metri.
Marco: A mountain of 1500 meters.
Consuelo: Di is used to indicate the origin of something or someone. Una persona di Parigi.
Marco: A person from Paris.
Consuelo: Sono di Genova.
Marco: I am from Geneva.
Consuelo: With Di, we can also indicate the quality: un uomo di cultura.
Marco: A man of culture.
Consuelo: Una cantante di talento.
Marco: A talented singer.
Consuelo: Furthermore, Di sometimes gives an emphatic value to the phrase, as in quello stupido del tuo amico.
Marco: That fool of your friend. Haha! Pretty angry here.
Consuelo: Sometimes Di has a modal value.
Marco: Ah yes, in this case replacing adverbs ending in -mente. For example
Consuelo: In the dialogue, we heard di brutto.
Marco: Like crazy, mad, tons. For example, piove di brutto, meaning it’s raining like crazy.
Consuelo: Di continuo is
Marco: Continuously.
Consuelo: Di corsa
Marco: Quickly.
Consuelo: And di moda
Marco: In fashion or fashionable.
Consuelo: When we use Di to indicate causal value, we can form some phrases like morire di noia
Marco: Die of boredom.
Consuelo: Bruciare di passione
Marco: Burn for passion.
Consuelo: Unto di olio
Marco: Greasy because of oil.

Outro

Consuelo: Okay this does it for the grammar.
Marco: We will wait for you in our next lesson.
Consuelo: Because we will continue studying other ways to use Di.
Marco: That just about does it for today.
Consuelo: Get instant access of all of our language learning lessons.
Marco: With any subscription, instantly access our entire library of audio and video lessons.
Consuelo: Download the lessons or listen or watch online.
Marco: Put them on your phone or another mobile device and listen, watch and learn anywhere.
Consuelo: Lessons are organized by level. So progress in order one level at a time.
Marco: Or skip around to different levels. It’s up to you.
Consuelo: Instantly access them all right now, at italianpod101.com
Marco: Ciao.
Consuelo: Ciao a tutti.

6 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello listeners! How many minutes do you usually spend to get ready to go out?

Angela
Thursday at 11:26 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Reguardando l'esempio : "Quello stupido del tuo amico!", scusa, ma non si dice mai in Inglese "That fool of your friend!" (Questo fraso in Inglese e' "gibberish"; e' Inglese brutto.) Ma spesso si dice in inglese "That stupid friend of yours!" Mi sembra che qui sia utilizzato "di" come "possession" (ie, "non e' il mio amico", e' il tuo amico")?


Grazie per questi lezzioni. May we have an additional example, please, of "di" used for emphasis?

(11-02-2021)

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 11:10 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Ciao John,


"ci" significa "qui", quindi non sarebbe necessaria (puoi dire "che fai qui?").

Ma si usa per enfasi, per chiedere non "cosa stai facendo?", ma per chiedere "perché sei qui?"

È una piccola differenza.


Ecco un esempio:

A va in giardino e vede B. Non è sorpreso, vuole sapere cosa sta facendo.

A: Che fai qui?

B: Leggo un libro.



VS

A vede B in un posto inaspettato. È sorpreso, vuole sapere perché è lì.

A: Che ci fai qui?

B: Sto cercando le chiavi. Non le trovo.


Spero che sia più chiaro adesso! Scrivi un commento se hai ancora dubbi.


Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

John
Thursday at 04:49 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Ciao. Perché la parola ci in questa frase? Ma che ci fai qui?

Chiara
Friday at 06:00 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Ciao!

In italiano non e' possibile leggere 1500 come 'quindici cento'. 1500 si legge solo come 'millecinquecento'.

Buono studio!

Chiara

Jay
Tuesday at 01:27 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Di solito solo trenta o quaranta minuti! Mi metto un bel camicia, una bella giacca, delle bene scarpe, ed esco.


Communque, ho una domanda per voi: Nel Pdf c'è il esempio "una montagna di 1500 metri". Potremmo dire anche "quindicicento", come l'inglese?


Vi ringrazio e buona giorn(ser)ata! :razz: