Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Ciao a tutti. Buongiorno.
Marco: Marco here. Upper intermediate, season 1, lesson #3. What’s That Name You Used to Call Me in Italian?
Consuelo: Hi, my name is Consuelo and I am joined here by Marco.
Marco: Hello everyone and welcome back to italianpod101.com
Consuelo: What are we learning today?
Marco: In today’s class, we will focus on the passato remoto tense of second conjugation regular verbs.
Consuelo: This conversation takes place on the phone.
Marco: And it’s between Claudia and Irene.
Consuelo: They will be speaking informal Italian.
Marco: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Irene: Pronto?
Claudia: Pronto, Ire sono io.
Irene: Oh ciao sorellona! Da dove chiami?
Claudia: Da Nairobi. Com'è andato l'esame?
Irene: Ah, bene bene.
Claudia: Un altro trenta?
Irene: Sì...
Claudia: Che secchiona!
Irene: Ma no...
Claudia: Invece sì! Lo sei sempre stata, dalle elementari... Quando ricevesti quel premio per la piccola scienziata dell'anno.
Irene: Vuoi dire il premio di miglior esperimento dell'anno.
Claudia: Sì, sì, quello! Comunque volevo dirti che ci vediamo sabato a pranzo dal babbo.
Irene: Ah, bene. Ciao a sabato allora!
Marco: Let’s here it slowly now.
Irene: Pronto?
Claudia: Pronto, Ire sono io.
Irene: Oh ciao sorellona! Da dove chiami?
Claudia: Da Nairobi. Com'è andato l'esame?
Irene: Ah, bene bene.
Claudia: Un altro trenta?
Irene: Sì...
Claudia: Che secchiona!
Irene: Ma no...
Claudia: Invece sì! Lo sei sempre stata, dalle elementari... Quando ricevesti quel premio per la piccola scienziata dell'anno.
Irene: Vuoi dire il premio di miglior esperimento dell'anno.
Claudia: Sì, sì, quello! Comunque volevo dirti che ci vediamo sabato a pranzo dal babbo.
Irene: Ah, bene. Ciao a sabato allora!
Marco: And now, with the translation.
Irene: Pronto?
Irene: Hello?
Claudia: Pronto, Ire sono io.
Claudia: Hello, Ire, it's me.
Irene: Oh ciao sorellona! Da dove chiami?
Irene: Oh, hi, sister! Where are you calling from?
Claudia: Da Nairobi. Com'è andato l'esame?
Claudia: From Nairobi. How did the test go?
Irene: Ah, bene bene.
Irene: Ah, well, very well.
Claudia: Un altro trenta?
Claudia: Another thirty?
Irene: Sì...
Irene: Yes...
Claudia: Che secchiona!
Claudia: What a swot!
Irene: Ma no...
Irene: No way...
Claudia: Invece sì! Lo sei sempre stata, dalle elementari... Quando ricevesti quel premio per la piccola scienziata dell'anno.
Claudia: It is so! You have always been since primary school... When you received that prize for little scientist of the year.
Irene: Vuoi dire il premio di miglior esperimento dell'anno.
Irene: You mean the prize for best experiment of the year.
Claudia: Sì, sì, quello! Comunque volevo dirti che ci vediamo sabato a pranzo dal babbo.
Claudia: Yeah, that one! By the way, I wanted to tell you that we'll meet on Saturday at Dad's for lunch.
Irene: Ah, bene. Ciao a sabato allora!
Irene: Ah, okay. Bye, see you on Saturday then!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Consuelo: La scuola elementare.
Marco: That is primary school right?
Consuelo: Yep. Now tell me Marco, as a student, what period did you like the most?
Marco: I really enjoyed scuole medie.
Consuelo: What? Junior high school, no way.
Marco: Why?
Consuelo: The best school years of my life were le scuole superiori.
Marco: Ah high school.
Consuelo: Sure. When you make those school trips abroad all around Europe.
Marco: Oh you are right. Those are definitely amusing. Where did you go with your class?
Consuelo: Oh umm..we went to many places. England, Austria, but the most impressive was Prague, in the Czech Republic.
Marco: I see. That’s a really charming city.
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is
Consuelo: Chiamare.
Marco: To call, to phone.
Consuelo: Chiamare. Chiamare.
Marco: Next we have
Consuelo: Secchione.
Marco: Swot, grind, dweeb.
Consuelo: Secchione. Secchione.
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Elementare.
Marco: Elementary.
Consuelo: Elementare. Elementare.
Marco: Next word is
Consuelo: Ricevere.
Marco: To receive, to get.
Consuelo: Ricevere. Ricevere.
Marco: And next we have scientist.
Consuelo: Scienziato. Scienziata. Scienziato. Scienziata.
Marco: And the next word is
Consuelo: Esperimento.
Marco: Experiment.
Consuelo: Esperimento. Esperimento
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Sabato.
Marco: Saturday.
Consuelo: Sabato. Sabato
Marco: And today’s last word is
Consuelo: Babbo.
Marco: Dad, father.
Consuelo: Babbo. Babbo.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Consuelo, what word are we studying today?
Consuelo: The Italian word “secchione”.
Marco: Secchione is masculine and the feminine is
Consuelo: That one we heard in the dialogue, secchiona.
Marco: It means swat, grind or dweeb.
Consuelo: In brief, someone who is really good in studies, but in Italian this word is not that offensive and has the meaning of bookish or bookworm.
Marco: Well it can become so depending on the tone used and the context.
Consuelo: Yes and no. We have another nice expression for that which is topo di biblioteca.
Marco: Haha! The library mouse, it’s very fun though.
Consuelo: However, sei un secchione Marco?
Marco: Sinceramente no. Honestly I don’t think so.
Consuelo: Aaha so you are a somaro.
Marco: A donkey? What’s that?
Consuelo: Those guys who are a bit blockheaded are called somaro in Italy.
Marco: Hey, I am not a dunce!
Consuelo: No, no I was just joking. Let’s take a look at today’s grammar point.

Lesson focus

Marco: In today’s lesson, we focus on the passato remoto tense of second conjugation regular verbs.
Consuelo: We will start by giving you the endings for each person.
Marco: Remember to drop the infinitive suffix and add the appropriate endings. For io use
Consuelo: -ei
Marco: Tu
Consuelo: -esti
Marco: Lui/lei
Consuelo: -è
Marco: Noi
Consuelo: -emmo
Marco: Loro
Consuelo: -erono
Marco: However, the first and the third singular and the third pleural persons have an alternative ending that can replace the ones we just said. For io you can also use
Consuelo: -etti
Marco: For lui/lei
Consuelo: -ette
Marco: And for loro
Consuelo: -ettero.
Marco: As a result, several regular verbs have a double form.
Consuelo: As happens with a regular verb ricevere, meaning to receive.
Marco: Let’s now listen to the conjugation for this verb.
Consuelo: Io ricevei or ricevetti.
Marco: I received.
Consuelo: Tu ricevesti.
Marco: You received.
Consuelo: Lui/lei ricevè or ricevette.
Marco: He/she/it received.
Consuelo: Noi ricevemmo.
Marco: We received.
Consuelo: Voi riceveste.
Marco: You received.
Consuelo: Loro riceverono or ricevettero.
Marco: They received.
Consuelo: And now let’s listen to some examples with regular -ere verbs at the passato remoto tense.
Marco: In the two possible variations.
Consuelo: The verb credere
Marco: To believe.
Consuelo: Crederono per anni a un culto magico.
Marco: Or
Consuelo: Credettero per anni a un culto magico.
Marco: They believed for years in magic worship.
Consuelo: The verb vendere
Marco: To sell.
Consuelo: Mi ricordo che vendei la mia macchina molti anni fa.
Marco: Or
Consuelo: Mi ricordo che vendetti la mia macchina molti anni fa.
Marco: I remember I sold my car many years ago.

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today.
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Marco: A presto.
Consuelo: Ciao a tutti.

15 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Hello, the two variations of the passato remoto were developed from the perfectum semplice tense in Latin, which didn't have a passato prossimo. They do not change from region to region. You can you both variations. You should be aware though that the passato remoto is hardly used in spoken Italian in North Italy. It is used in Tuscany, central and especially Sounth Italy. Thank you

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 03:33 AM
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Ciao Joseph Zizzo,

quando il pronome sostituisce un aggettivo (come "secchiona"), si usa LO, non LA, anche se l'aggettivo è femminile.

Ecco un altro esempio:

Sei timida?

Sì, LO sono sempre stata.


"Secchiona" è considerato aggettivo perché sarebbe "una [persona] secchiona".


Grazie per il tuo commento!

Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

Joseph Zizzo
Tuesday at 07:53 AM
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ciao,


perche non usiamo il pronome "la," à riga 10? Il pronome sostituisce "secchiona," qui è feminile...

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 03:48 AM
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Ciao Chen,


I'd recommend you to check out our Grammar Bank feature. You can access it by clicking on this link: https://www.italianpod101.com/italian-grammar/.


Here, you can select Category >> Verbs and you will get 11 grammar entries. All of these contain detailed descriptions. You will find the most important Italian verbs that one must master very early and to a very confident manner: avere, dovere, essere, fare, potere, stare, and volere. You will also find there some more materials about verbs but learning these 7 very basic verbs should be the priority for now. 😉


Hope this helps. Good luck!


A presto,

Levente

Team ItalianPod101.com

Chen
Friday at 11:03 AM
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Do you have a study list of most used verbs and its conjugation in different grammar tenses? Grazie!!

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 02:02 AM
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Hi Miri,

I have to take back what I just wrote! Even though I couldn't find a definition of "grind" similar to "secchione" on Italian-English dictionaries, I found it on thefreedictionary.com. I'm quoting:

Grind

n.

5. Informal - A student who works or studies excessively.


So that appears to be correct.

Thank you again for your comment, I learned something new! 😁


Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 01:36 AM
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Hi Miri,

thank you for your comment and explanation. I agree with you, I'll see if we can have that word removed as it is not correct.


A presto!

Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

Miri
Sunday at 09:56 AM
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"Nerd" would work well for "secchione" in American English. "Grind" refers to hard, boring work, not really to a person - "Ugh! Vacation is over. Back to the daily grind."


Nerd, or geek, used to be a harder insult than it is now. They can still be used as insults, but they are often used for friendly teasing these days. Some people even use them as compliments.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 09:49 AM
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Hi Simon,


Thank you for clarifying the meaning of the English "swot" ?

In American English that's probably "grind."

I think both are a good translation for the Italian "secchione" ?


Grazie!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Simon
Friday at 05:20 AM
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In reply to Amy - yes "swot" is an English (British) word. It refers to someone, in a derogative way, who is always studying and revising. I don't think the US "nerd" quite means that, but being English I might be wrong!!

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 04:54 PM
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Cari Kathryn & Allan,


Avete ragione: il passato remoto fu sempre un problema! :laughing:

Se avete qualche domanda, lasciate un commento.

If you have any question, please leave a comment.


Arrivederci e grazie!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com