Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Ciao a tutti, ben tornati.
Marco: Marco here. Upper intermediate season 1, Lesson #16. Someone’s Italian Words Might Get Him into Trouble.
Consuelo: Hello everyone. I am Consuelo and welcome to italianpod101.com.
Marco: With us, you learn to speak Italian with fun and effective lessons.
Consuelo: We also provide you with cultural insights
Marco: And tips you won’t find in a textbook. In today’s class, we will focus on the indefinite pronouns ognuno/ognuna, tutti/tutte and qualcuno/qualcuna.
Consuelo: This conversation takes place in front of a movie theater.
Marco: And it’s between Irene and Mirco.
Consuelo: They will be speaking informal Italian.
Marco: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Irene: Amore, allora cosa facciamo questo fine settimana?
Mirco: Dai, lo sanno tutti che la domenica ho le partite di calcio.
Irene: Va bene, va bene... e allora sabato, cosa facciamo sabato?
Mirco: Mi dispiace ma sabato devo aiutare mia zia con il trasloco poi vado a pescare con i miei amici.
Irene: Cosa? Stai scherzando? Mi stai dicendo che non ci vediamo questo fine settimana?
Mirco: Eh sì, che ti devo dire, ognuno ha i suoi impegni!
Irene: Ah certo, ma sai che gli impegni si possono anche cancellare o posticipare!
Mirco: Ci siamo, è partita...
Irene: Ma non ti preoccupare, troverò di meglio da fare, questo è sicuro! Adesso vado, ciao!
Mirco: Cosa?! E il film? Ma dove stai andando, Irene!
Irene: Mi ero scordata che ho un impegno! Mi dispiace, ciao!
Mirco: Qualcuno mi aiuti a capire le donne!
Marco: Let’s here it slowly now.
Irene: Amore, allora cosa facciamo questo fine settimana?
Mirco: Dai, lo sanno tutti che la domenica ho le partite di calcio.
Irene: Va bene, va bene... e allora sabato, cosa facciamo sabato?
Mirco: Mi dispiace ma sabato devo aiutare mia zia con il trasloco poi vado a pescare con i miei amici.
Irene: Cosa? Stai scherzando? Mi stai dicendo che non ci vediamo questo fine settimana?
Mirco: Eh sì, che ti devo dire, ognuno ha i suoi impegni!
Irene: Ah certo, ma sai che gli impegni si possono anche cancellare o posticipare!
Mirco: Ci siamo, è partita...
Irene: Ma non ti preoccupare, troverò di meglio da fare, questo è sicuro! Adesso vado, ciao!
Mirco: Cosa?! E il film? Ma dove stai andando, Irene!
Irene: Mi ero scordata che ho un impegno! Mi dispiace, ciao!
Mirco: Qualcuno mi aiuti a capire le donne!
Marco: And now, with the translation.
Irene: Amore, allora cosa facciamo questo fine settimana?
Irene: Honey, so what are we doing this weekend?
Mirco: Dai, lo sanno tutti che la domenica ho le partite di calcio.
Mirco: Come on, everybody knows I have soccer matches on Sundays.
Irene: Va bene, va bene... e allora sabato, cosa facciamo sabato?
Irene: Okay, okay... So Saturday, what are we doing on Saturday?
Mirco: Mi dispiace ma sabato devo aiutare mia zia con il trasloco poi vado a pescare con i miei amici.
Mirco: Sorry, but Saturday I have to help my aunt with the move and then I'll go fishing with my friends.
Irene: Cosa? Stai scherzando? Mi stai dicendo che non ci vediamo questo fine settimana?
Irene: What? Are you kidding? Are you telling me that we are not seeing each other this weekend?
Mirco: Eh sì, che ti devo dire, ognuno ha i suoi impegni!
Mirco: Well, yes. What can I say, everyone has their own plans!
Irene: Ah certo, ma sai che gli impegni si possono anche cancellare o posticipare!
Irene: Oh sure, but you know, we can also cancel or postpone plans!
Mirco: Ci siamo, è partita...
Mirco: Here she goes...
Irene: Ma non ti preoccupare, troverò di meglio da fare, questo è sicuro! Adesso vado, ciao!
Irene: But don't worry, I'll find something better to do, that's for sure! Now I'm leaving, bye!
Mirco: Cosa?! E il film? Ma dove stai andando, Irene!
Mirco: What? And the movie? Hey, where are you going, Irene!
Irene: Mi ero scordata che ho un impegno! Mi dispiace, ciao!
Irene: I forgot that I have stuff to do! I'm sorry, bye!
Mirco: Qualcuno mi aiuti a capire le donne!
Mirco: Someone help me understand women!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: Hey Consuelo, this couple is having a fight.
Consuelo: Si, stanno litigando. They are fighting. I’d rather say arguing.
Marco: What do you mean? Fights between couples can be bigger than this and can happen outside, I mean in public theaters like a movie theater?
Consuelo: Of course Marco. You lived in Italy. You should know how it works.
Marco: All right but I don’t remember any huge fights on the streets.
Consuelo: You know what, I like when it happens. Si, è forte.
Marco: What? Why?
Consuelo: Because if you are lucky, you can see a girl slapping a guy on the cheek. That’s very amusing to me, divertente, but only if it’s not between my friends of course.
Marco: Oh my god! Listeners, beware of Italian women.
Consuelo: Ey! It’s not a common habit. Come on, we are not all like that.
Marco: I really hope so. Anyway, I like when Mirco says è partita, literally meaning she left.
Consuelo: Oh yes you mean when Irene started complaining?
Marco: Yep in English, it is oh, here she goes! In Italian, è partita gives more the sense of she left for her own trip.
Consuelo: Wow interesting interpretation.
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is
Consuelo: Domenica.
Marco: Sunday.
Consuelo: Domenica. Domenica
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Trasloco.
Marco: Move, house moving, relocation
Consuelo: Trasloco. Trasloco
Marco: Next we have
Consuelo: Pescare.
Marco: To fish, catch fish, fish out.
Consuelo: Pescare. Pescare
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Impegno.
Marco: Plan.
Consuelo: Impegno. Impegno
Marco: And the next word is
Consuelo: Cancellare.
Marco: To cancel, delete, erase.
Consuelo: Cancellare. Cancellare
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Partire.
Marco: To leave, start, take off.
Consuelo: Partire. Partire
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Trovare.
Marco: To find.
Consuelo: Trovare. Trovare
Marco: And today’s last word is
Consuelo: Film.
Marco: Movie.
Consuelo: Film. Film.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Consuelo, what expression are we studying today?
Consuelo: The Italian expression “stai scherzando?”
Marco: Are you joking? Are you kidding?
Consuelo: Scherzando is the verb scherzare.
Marco: To joke.
Consuelo: Conjugated at the gerundio tense the present continuous.
Marco: So in stai scherzando, since there is stai, it refers to tu, which is you.
Consuelo: When we say stai scherzando in Italian, we sometimes add spero.
Marco: Spero is I hope. Consuelo, let’s try a practical example.
Consuelo: Okay umm let me think ah Marco, ti ho graffiato la macchina poco fa, scusa. I scratched your car a little while ago. Sorry!
Marco: Cosa? Stai scherzando spero. I hope you are kidding.
Consuelo: Ahah, I saw the terror in your eyes. Don’t worry, it was just a sample sentence.
Marco: Very funny Consuelo. So back on topic. Scusa, ma ho mangiato il tuo yogurt per sbaglio. Sorry but I ate your yogurt by mistake.
Consuelo: Stai scherzando?
Marco: No.
Consuelo: Oh no, il mio yogurt alle fragole.

Lesson focus

Consuelo: Let’s take a look at today’s grammar point.
Marco: In today’s lesson, we will focus on the indefinite pronouns ognuno/ognuna and tutti/tutte.
Consuelo: And qualcuno/qualcuna.
Marco: As you know, pronouns take the place of nouns.
Consuelo: In the case of indefinite pronouns, they do not refer to a particular person or thing.
Marco: Except when they replace something or someone previously mentioned.
Consuelo: In English, these are: someone, everybody, nobody, something and so on.
Marco: You will see that some of them resemble indefinite adjectives we already covered in a previous lesson.
Consuelo: So please don’t confuse them. Okay let’s start. The first we have is ognuno/ognuna.
Marco: Each, everyone.
Consuelo: This pronoun is often followed by Di noi, Di voi and Di loro, and has a masculine and a feminine version according to the noun it replaces.
Marco: Listen carefully to the following examples.
Consuelo: Ognuno deve fare i compiti.
Marco: Everyone has to do homework.
Consuelo: Ognuno di noi ha un lato nascosto.
Marco: Every one of us has a hidden side.
Consuelo: Prima lavate bene le scarpe, poi ognuna deve essere lucidata.
Marco: First clean the shoes well and then each one must be polished.
Consuelo: Remember not to confuse ognuno/ognuna with ogni plus a noun which is the adjective.
Marco: Thank you for reminding us. Let’s go on with the next pronoun.
Consuelo: Tutti or Tutte.
Marco: All or everybody.
Consuelo: Please remember to choose the appropriate masculine or feminine form when using this pronoun.
Marco: Let’s hear some phrases now.
Consuelo: Tutti dicono cose stupide ogni tanto.
Marco: Everybody says stupid things sometimes.
Consuelo: Ho contattato le mie vecchie amiche. Adesso sono tutte sposate.
Marco: I contacted my old friends. Now they are all married.
Consuelo: Also, in this case, if tutti or tutte is followed by a definite article plus a noun, it is the adjective.
Marco: Okay let’s go on with someone or some.
Consuelo: Qualcuno or qualcuna.
Marco: This is another pronoun with a masculine and a feminine form. So remember to choose the right one. Consuelo, could you give our listeners some examples with this pronoun?
Consuelo: Sure: qualcuno mi ha detto che vai in vacanza in Egitto.
Marco: Someone told me that you are going to Egypt on a holiday.
Consuelo: Ho comprato sei mele ma qualcuna non è buona.
Marco: I bought six Apples but some are not good.
Consuelo: Qualcuno mi ha detto che Marco non parla bene l’italiano.
Marco: Ey really? Veramente? Someone told you I didn’t speak good Italian?!
Consuelo: No it’s a joke.

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today. Not enough time.
Consuelo: You are very busy.
Marco: We know. That’s why we have one click lesson downloads and iTunes.
Consuelo: Subscribe on iTunes
Marco: All free materials will be automatically downloaded for each new lesson as they become available.
Consuelo: Basic and premium members, get all access to one’s lesson materials too.
Marco: Save time. Spend more time studying.
Consuelo: Never worry about missing another lesson again.
Marco: Go to iTunes, search with the phrase italianpod101.com and click subscribe.
Consuelo: Ciao a tutti.

5 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Cosa fate il fine settimana?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 02:19 AM
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Hi Aaron,

thanks for your question.

Yes, the verb in the sentence "qualcuno mi aiuti" is in the Subjunctive (congiuntivo) mood. It's actually called "congiuntivo esortativo", and it is used for the missing persons of the Imperative.

Example:

Ascolta! = Listen! (informal Imperative)

Ascolti! = Listen! (formal Imperative - verbal form borrowed from the Subjunctive)


That means that you should NOT automatically use the Subjunctive every time you see "qualcuno", but only if it's an order or a request.

Look at the difference with this other example:

Qualcuno mi ascolti! = Someone listen to me! (formal imperative - use the Subjunctive)

Qualcuno mi ascolta? = Is anybody listening to me? (present simple, Indicative mood)


I hope this clears things up!


Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

Aaron
Wednesday at 07:39 AM
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Qualcuno mi aiuti... Is this the congiuntivo mood and is that what is supposed to be used after qualcuno? Thanks, Aaron

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 06:53 PM
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Ciao George,


Thank you for your comment. We are always working on improving our materials, and your opinion is highly valuable!


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team ItalianPod101.com

George Boccanfuso
Sunday at 06:24 AM
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In future recordings please pronunce "adjective" properly. It is "ad-jec-tive".


Thank you