Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Ciao a tutti. Ben tornati.
Marco: Marco here. Upper intermediate, season 1, Lesson #15. At least I Speak Better Italian Than Some People.
Consuelo: Hi, my name is Consuelo and I am joined here by Marco.
Marco: Hello everyone and welcome back to italianpod101.com
Consuelo: What are we learning today?
Marco: In today’s class, we will focus on the indefinite adjectives qualche, alcuni/alcune, un po’ di, partitive Di, qualunque and qualsiasi.
Consuelo: This conversation takes place at a veterinary clinic.
Marco: And it’s between a doctor, a client and Irene.
Consuelo: They will be speaking formal Italian.
Marco: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Irene: Buongiorno, si accomodi.
Cliente: Grazie, posso aprire la gabbia?
Irene: Prego, la appoggi qui sul tavolo e poi la apra pure.
Dottoressa: Cosa è successo a questo bel gattone?
Cliente: Non so, qualche giorno fa ha cominciato a zoppicare, poi la sua zampa ha cominciato a gonfiarsi.
Dottoressa: Eh sì. Il suo gatto... come si chiama?
Cliente: Si chiama Filippo.
Dottoressa: Ah. Filippo esce spesso di casa vero?
Cliente: Sì, è un vagabondo.
Dottoressa: Come pensavo, vede, qui ci sono alcuni segni di morsi. Molto probabilmente ha un'infezione.
Irene: La posso aiutare dottoressa?
Dottoressa: Sì, metti un po’ di disinfettante sulle ferite mentre io preparo l'iniezione.
Irene: Hai sentito Filippo? Ti facciamo una puntura e potrai camminare di nuovo.
Marco: Let’s here it slowly now.
Irene: Buongiorno, si accomodi.
Cliente: Grazie, posso aprire la gabbia?
Irene: Prego, la appoggi qui sul tavolo e poi la apra pure.
Dottoressa: Cosa è successo a questo bel gattone?
Cliente: Non so, qualche giorno fa ha cominciato a zoppicare, poi la sua zampa ha cominciato a gonfiarsi.
Dottoressa: Eh sì. Il suo gatto... come si chiama?
Cliente: Si chiama Filippo.
Dottoressa: Ah. Filippo esce spesso di casa vero?
Cliente: Sì, è un vagabondo.
Dottoressa: Come pensavo, vede, qui ci sono alcuni segni di morsi. Molto probabilmente ha un'infezione.
Irene: La posso aiutare dottoressa?
Dottoressa: Sì, metti un po’ di disinfettante sulle ferite mentre io preparo l'iniezione.
Irene: Hai sentito Filippo? Ti facciamo una puntura e potrai camminare di nuovo.
Marco: And now, with the translation.
Irene: Buongiorno, si accomodi.
Irene: Good morning, please enter.
Cliente: Grazie, posso aprire la gabbia?
Client: Thank you; can I open the cage?
Irene: Prego, la appoggi qui sul tavolo e poi la apra pure.
Irene: Yes, please put it on the table and then open it.
Dottoressa: Cosa è successo a questo bel gattone?
Doctor: What happened to this cute, big cat?
Cliente: Non so, qualche giorno fa ha cominciato a zoppicare, poi la sua zampa ha cominciato a gonfiarsi.
Client: I don't know, some days ago he started to limp, and then his leg started to swell.
Dottoressa: Eh sì. Il suo gatto... come si chiama?
Doctor: I see. Your cat... What is his name?
Cliente: Si chiama Filippo.
Client: He's called Filippo.
Dottoressa: Ah. Filippo esce spesso di casa vero?
Doctor: Ah... Does Filippo get out of home often?
Cliente: Sì, è un vagabondo.
Client: Yes, he's a vagabond.
Dottoressa: Come pensavo, vede, qui ci sono alcuni segni di morsi. Molto probabilmente ha un'infezione.
Doctor: As I thought, you see, here there are some bite marks. He probably has an infection.
Irene: La posso aiutare dottoressa?
Irene: May I help you, Doctor?
Dottoressa: Sì, metti un po’ di disinfettante sulle ferite mentre io preparo l'iniezione.
Doctor: Yes, put some disinfectant on the injuries while I prepare the injection.
Irene: Hai sentito Filippo? Ti facciamo una puntura e potrai camminare di nuovo.
Irene: Did you hear, Filippo? We'll give you a shot and you'll be able to walk again.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: Hey Consuelo, Irene is at the veterinary clinic.
Consuelo: Si, è in uno studio veterinario.
Marco: Do you like pets?
Consuelo: Sure. I love cats.
Marco: Me too. What about dogs?
Consuelo: Mmm, non mi piacciono i cani. Now in Italy, people have started to dress their little dogs.
Marco: Yes I have seen. It’s the recent fashion.
Consuelo: Some famous brands are also making entire collections for dogs also in Italy.
Marco: Aahaha I see.
Consuelo: A little dog like a chiwawa with a glittering jacket can be nice but I always wonder, se questi cani potessero parlare cosa direbbero?
Marco: If these dogs could speak, what will they say? Interesting question.
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is
Consuelo: Gabbia.
Marco: Cage
Consuelo: Gabbia. Gabbia.
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Appoggiare.
Marco: To put, lean.
Consuelo: Appoggiare. Appoggiare
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Zampa.
Marco: Leg.
Consuelo: Zampa. Zampa.
Marco: And the next word is
Consuelo: Gonfiarsi.
Marco: To swell, puff up, blow up.
Consuelo: Gonfiarsi. Gonfiarsi
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Probabilmente.
Marco: Probably, perhaps
Consuelo: Probabilmente. Probabilmente.
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Infezione.
Marco: Infection.
Consuelo: Infezione. Infezione.
Marco: The next word is
Consuelo: Aiutare.
Marco: To help, aid, assist.
Consuelo: Aiutare. Aiutare
Marco: And today’s last word is
Consuelo: Iniezione.
Marco: Injection, shot.
Consuelo: Iniezione. Iniezione
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Consuelo, what word are we studying today?
Consuelo: The Italian word “gattone”.
Marco: A big cat.
Consuelo: Oh I love cats and I also have a gattone and he likes lasagna like Garfield.
Marco: Really?
Consuelo: Yep. When you hear a word ending in -one, sometimes it takes the meaning of something bigger.
Marco: What do you mean?
Consuelo: Take gattone for example. It comes from gatto. So we have gatto, gattone.
Marco: Ah I got it. As if I say nasone.
Consuelo: Yes a big nose. Naso, nasone.
Marco: What about feminine nouns?
Consuelo: Well there are several exceptions but basically they take the ending -ona.
Marco: For example
Consuelo: Macchina, macchinona. Tazza, tazzona. And insalata, insalatona.
Marco: Ah a big car, a big cup and a big portion of salad.

Lesson focus

Consuelo: Let’s take a look at today’s grammar point.
Marco: In today’s lesson, we will focus on the indefinite adjectives qualche, alcuni and alcune,
Consuelo: Un po’ di, the partitive Di, qualunque and qualsiasi.
Marco: These all mean some or any.
Consuelo: They do not refer to a particular person or thing. For this reason, they are called indefinite adjectives.
Marco: Thank you for mentioning them again Consuelo. We can now start from the first. Qualche, meaning some or a few.
Consuelo: Qualche is used only with singular nouns and is invariable.
Marco: Please remember that this adjective is never employed with uncountable items.
Consuelo: Such as acqua.
Marco: Water.
Consuelo: Or pasta and sale.
Marco: Pasta and salt. Let’s listen to qualche inside a phrase.
Consuelo: Mi piacerebbe imparare qualche canzone italiana.
Marco: I’d like to learn some Italian songs.
Consuelo: Instead of qualche we can also use alcuni or alcune,
Marco: Meaning some or a few.
Consuelo: Unlike qualche these two must always refer only to plural nouns.
Marco: We use alcuni with masculine nouns while we use alcune with feminine nouns. Here are some examples.
Consuelo: Alcuni amici giocano a calcio.
Marco: Some friends play soccer.
Consuelo: Alcune persone sono più sensibili.
Marco: Some people are more sensitive.
Consuelo: Now let’s continue with expression un po’ di,
Marco: Some or a little.
Consuelo: It is commonly used with uncountable nouns.
Marco: For instance?
Consuelo: Mi piace bere il caffè con un po’ di latte.
Marco: I like drinking coffee with a bit of milk.
Consuelo: Sento un po’ di ansia.
Marco: I feel some anxiety. Another way to express some or any, is to use the partitive Di plus a definite article.
Consuelo: As in: hai dei bellissimi fiori in giardino.
Marco: You have some beautiful flowers in the garden.
Consuelo: Dei is Di plus I.
Marco: Let’s listen to another phrase.
Consuelo: Ci sono delle melanzane in frigo.
Marco: There are some eggplants in the fridge.
Consuelo: Here Delle is composed of Di plus Le.
Marco: Lastly we have qualunque and qualsiasi, which actually have the same meaning: any. Now please listen.
Consuelo: Qualunque cosa tu dica mi fa arrabbiare.
Marco: Anything you say makes me angry. It is the same as saying….
Consuelo: Qualsiasi cosa tu dica mi fa arrabbiare.
Marco: The last example?
Consuelo: Sure: qualunque proposta è ben accetta.
Marco: Any suggestion is well accepted. The same as saying...
Consuelo: Qualsiasi proposta è ben accetta.

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today.
Consuelo: There is nothing like a little competition.
Marco: Even against yourself.
Consuelo: That’s what you learn in this lesson with our fun review quizzes.
Marco: Master vocabulary, grammar and vocabulary with short challenging quizzes.
Consuelo: Find these quizzes on the lessons page at italianpod101.com. Ciao.
Marco: Ciao a tutti.

3 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Do you like Italian cats?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:27 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Brian,


Hai ragione, i gatti a volte sono buffi!?

You're right, cats sometimes are funny!


A presto,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Brian
Tuesday at 10:19 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Sì, mi piacciono i gatti… loro sono abbastanza divertente.

Yes, I like cats… they are quite amusing. :)