Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Ciao. Buongiorno a tutti.
Marco: Marco here. Upper intermediate, season 1, Lesson #11. I Will Only Forgive You After You Will Have Told Me Everything in Italian.
Consuelo: Hello everyone. I am Consuelo and welcome to italianpod101.com
Marco: With us, you will learn to speak Italian with fun and effective lessons.
Consuelo: We also provide you with cultural insights
Marco: And tips you won’t find in a textbook. In today’s class, we will focus on the futur anterieur, the future perfect.
Consuelo: This conversation takes place at the park.
Marco: And it’s between Mirco and Irene.
Consuelo: They will be speaking informal Italian.
Marco: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Mirco: Sai, non vengo spesso al parco, non ho mai tempo.
Irene: A me piace venire qui, a volte porto pure i libri e mi metto a studiare.
Mirco: Già, tu studi dappertutto!!
Irene: Ah ah, non è vero, ma piuttosto, dimmi, perché non ti sei fatto vedere sabato scorso? Ho fatto qualcosa..?
Mirco: Cosa? Tu? Assolutamente no, se ho l'occasione di vederti non manco mai, ma la partita è finita tardi e siamo andati a cena con la squadra. Ecco perché ho chiamato Filippo.
Irene: Davvero? Filippo mi ha detto che...
Mirco: Cosa ti ha detto?
Irene: No niente.
Mirco: Dai, dimmi cosa ti ha detto!
Irene: Non ha importanza non me lo chiedere più!
Mirco: Non te lo chiederò più solo quando me lo avrai detto!
Irene: Andiamo su quella panchina...!
Marco: Let’s here it slowly now.
Mirco: Sai, non vengo spesso al parco, non ho mai tempo.
Irene: A me piace venire qui, a volte porto pure i libri e mi metto a studiare.
Mirco: Già, tu studi dappertutto!!
Irene: Ah ah, non è vero, ma piuttosto, dimmi, perché non ti sei fatto vedere sabato scorso? Ho fatto qualcosa..?
Mirco: Cosa? Tu? Assolutamente no, se ho l'occasione di vederti non manco mai, ma la partita è finita tardi e siamo andati a cena con la squadra. Ecco perché ho chiamato Filippo.
Irene: Davvero? Filippo mi ha detto che...
Mirco: Cosa ti ha detto?
Irene: No niente.
Mirco: Dai, dimmi cosa ti ha detto!
Irene: Non ha importanza non me lo chiedere più!
Mirco: Non te lo chiederò più solo quando me lo avrai detto!
Irene: Andiamo su quella panchina...!
Marco: And now, with the translation.
Mirco: Sai, non vengo spesso al parco, non ho mai tempo.
Mirco: You know, I don't come often to the park. I never have time.
Irene: A me piace venire qui, a volte porto pure i libri e mi metto a studiare.
Irene: I like coming here; sometimes I bring books and start studying.
Mirco: Già, tu studi dappertutto!!
Mirco: Right, you study everywhere!
Irene: Ah ah, non è vero, ma piuttosto, dimmi, perché non ti sei fatto vedere sabato scorso? Ho fatto qualcosa..?
Irene: Ah ah, it's not true. But I'd rather you tell me why you didn't show up last Saturday. Did I do something...?
Mirco: Cosa? Tu? Assolutamente no, se ho l'occasione di vederti non manco mai, ma la partita è finita tardi e siamo andati a cena con la squadra. Ecco perché ho chiamato Filippo.
Mirco: What? You? Absolutely not; if I have the chance to see you I never miss it, but the match finished late and we had dinner with the team. That's why I called Filippo.
Irene: Davvero? Filippo mi ha detto che...
Irene: Really? Filippo told me that...
Mirco: Cosa ti ha detto?
Mirco: What did he tell you?
Irene: No niente.
Irene: Oh, nothing.
Mirco: Dai, dimmi cosa ti ha detto!
Mirco: Come on! Tell me what he said!
Irene: Non ha importanza non me lo chiedere più!
Irene: It doesn't matter. Don't ask me anymore!
Mirco: Non te lo chiederò più solo quando me lo avrai detto!
Mirco: I won't ask you anymore only after you'll have told me!
Irene: Andiamo su quella panchina...!
Irene: Let's go to that bench...!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: Hey Consuelo, what’s going on here?
Consuelo: Irene and Mirco cleared things up, I guess.
Marco: It is obvious that there is something between them.
Consuelo: Yes Mirco said “se ho l'occasione di vederti non manco mai”.
Marco: If I had the chance to see you, I never miss it.
Consuelo: So their friend Filippo made them have this sort of misunderstanding.
Marco: Yes I remember.
Consuelo: We will see what happens.
Marco: What is Mirco’s team? I mean what sport do you think it is?
Consuelo: I am pretty sure it’s soccer.
Marco: Calcio.
Consuelo: Having dinner with a team after a match reminds me of my Italian friends who played soccer.
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Ah I see. Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is
Consuelo: Parco.
Marco: Park.
Consuelo: Parco. Parco
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Libro.
Marco: Book.
Consuelo: Libro. Libro
Marco: The next word is
Consuelo: Dappertutto.
Marco: Everywhere.
Consuelo: Dappertutto. Dappertutto.
Marco: And the next word is
Consuelo: Assolutamente.
Marco: Absolutely.
Consuelo: Assolutamente. Assolutamente
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Mancare.
Marco: To be lacking, missing.
Consuelo: Mancare. Mancare.
Marco: And the next word is
Consuelo: Squadra.
Marco: Team.
Consuelo: Squadra. Squadra
Marco: And the next word is
Consuelo: Importanza.
Marco: Importance.
Consuelo: Importanza. Importanza
Marco: And today’s last word is
Consuelo: Panchina.
Marco: Bench.
Consuelo: Panchina. Panchina
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: So Consuelo, what expression are we studying today?
Consuelo: The Italian expression “mettersi a”.
Marco: To start to.
Consuelo: This is a very common and useful expression.
Marco: Literally it means to put oneself into something but it is translated as to start to do something.
Consuelo: Let’s look at some practical examples.
Marco: I have heard this expression many times combined with dieta, meaning diet.
Consuelo: Bravo Marco. Mettersi a dieta.
Marco: To start the diet.
Consuelo: Da domani mi metto a dieta.
Marco: From tomorrow, I start the diet. Is that true?
Consuelo: Absolutely not. Let’s go on with our examples now. This is nice. Se non la smetti mi metto a urlare.
Marco: If you don’t stop, I will start screaming.
Consuelo: As you can see, mettersi a can be followed by a noun or a verb at the infinitive form.
Marco: Okay so one last example.
Consuelo: Questo film è commovente. Ora mi metto a piangere.
Marco: This movie is moving. Now I will start crying. No Consuelo, non piangere.

Lesson focus

Consuelo: Let’s take a look at today’s grammar point.
Marco: In today’s lesson, we focused on the futuro anteriore.
Consuelo: The future perfect.
Marco: When should we employ the futuro anteriore?
Consuelo: As in English, it is different from the simple future, futuro semplice, since it is used to express a future action that is completed before another future action.
Marco: In other words, this action will be over and done with before another future event occurs.
Consuelo: If we take a look at the meaning of the word anteriore in Italian, it is easier to understand whether to employ this tense.
Marco: Anteriore stands for previous or earlier.
Consuelo: Consequently, futuro anteriore is used to report a future event that will happen earlier than in other one that is expressed through futuro semplice.
Marco: We talked about its usage. Now let’s see how to conjugate a verb at futuro anteriore .
Consuelo: The futuro anteriore is a compound tense formed with futuro semplice of the auxiliary verb essere or avere plus the past participle of the main verb.
Marco: In the dialogue, we heard Mirco saying:
Consuelo: Non te lo chiederò più solo quando me lo avrai detto.
Marco: I won’t ask you anymore only after you have told me.
Consuelo: Now in English, in the same situation, we use the simple present and the future.
Marco: So remember that in Italian, it’s better to use futuro anteriore. Listen carefully to the following statements.
Consuelo: Quando avrai finito di lavorare andremo a cena fuori?
Marco: When you will have finished working, will we go out for dinner?
Consuelo: Partirò per la Svezia solo quando avrò trovato un lavoro.
Marco: I will leave for Sweden only when I will have found a job.
Consuelo: So the verbs at futur anterieur were avrai finito and avrò trovato.
Marco: Now let’s listen to the conjugation for all the six persons of the verb dire, meaning to say.
Consuelo: Io avrò detto
Marco: I will have said.
Consuelo: Tu avrai detto
Marco: You will have said.
Consuelo: Lui/lei avrà detto
Marco: He/She/It will have said.
Consuelo: Noi avremmo detto
Marco: We will have said.
Consuelo: Voi avrete detto
Marco: You will have said.
Consuelo: Loro avranno detto
Marco: They will have said.
Consuelo: The futuro anteriore has an additional employment.
Marco: It is used also when expressing doubts and conjectures.
Consuelo: But we will see this different employment in detail during the next lesson.

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today. Listeners, do you know the reason flashcards are so popular.
Consuelo: It’s because they work.
Marco: We have taken this time tested studying tool and modernized with My Word Bank flashcards.
Consuelo: Learn vocabulary using your eyes and ears.
Marco: It’s simple and powerful. Save difficult and interesting words to your personal vocabulary list called My Word Bank.
Consuelo: Master words in your My Word Bank by practicing with flashcards.
Marco: Words in My Word Bank come with audio so you learn proper pronunciation.
Consuelo: While you learn to recognize words by sight.
Marco: Go to italianpod101.com now and try My Word Bank and flashcards today.
Consuelo: Ciao, alla prossima lezione.

3 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Have you ever studied in the park?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 12:40 PM
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Hi Antonette,


In this case, "pure" means "even" or "also": "...sometimes I bring even books..."

Unfortunately, there isn't any lesson, which addresses the use of the word "pure". We'll consider your request when making new contents.


Thank you,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Antonette
Wednesday at 10:50 PM
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Would you please explain the use of the word "pure" in the phrase "a volte porto pure i libre


Is there a lesson that addresses the use of the word "pure"?