Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Cinzia: Hello everyone! I'm Cinzia, and welcome to ItalianPOD101.
Marco: With us, you'll learn to speak Italian with fun and effective lessons.
Cinzia: We also provide you with cultural insights
Marco: and tips you won't find in a textbook...
Marco: In this lesson we will continue our study of the first type of Italian direct object pronouns, the pronomi personali atoni This conversation takes place at Laura and Martina's apartment
Cinzia: And it's between Laura and Martina Since they are friends they will be speaking informally
Marco:
Cinzia:
Marco: Now, before we listen to the conversation...
Cinzia: We want to ask...
Marco: Do you read the lesson notes, while you listen?
Cinzia: We received an e-mail about this study tip.
Marco: So we were wondering if you've tried it, and if so,
Cinzia: what do you think of it.
Marco: You can leave us feedback in the comment section of this lesson. Okay...
Marco: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Laura: Hai pagato le bollette?
Martina: Oddio, non le ho ancora pagate!
Laura: Entro quando dobbiamo pagarle?
Martina: Ora guardo. Entro giovedì prossimo.
Laura: Siamo ancora in tempo.
Martina: Vado domani mattina presto.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Laura: Hai pagato le bollette?
Martina: Oddio, non le ho ancora pagate!
Laura: Entro quando dobbiamo pagarle?
Martina: Ora guardo. Entro giovedì prossimo.
Laura: Siamo ancora in tempo.
Martina: Vado domani mattina presto.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Laura: Hai pagato le bollette?
Marco: Did you pay the bills?
Martina: Oddio, non le ho ancora pagate!
Marco: My goodness, I still haven’t paid them!
Laura: Entro quando dobbiamo pagarle?
Marco: By when do we have to pay them?
Martina: Ora guardo. Entro giovedì prossimo.
Marco: Let me see, by next Thursday.
Laura: Siamo ancora in tempo.
Marco: We are still in time.
Martina: Vado domani mattina presto.
Marco: I’ll go early tomorrow morning.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Cinzia: In Italy you can pay house bills like the water or electricity bill at the post office.
Marco: Or you can also pay the bills of some companies at the tabaccaio. The tobacco shop.
Cinzia: Also called tabacchino!
Marco: Yes, you are absolutely right Cinzia.
Cinzia: If you have bills to pay, be careful about the due date.
Marco: Or you might have to pay a fee for late payment.
Cinzia: So try to be on time!
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Cinzia: bolletta [natural native speed]
Marco: bill
Cinzia: bolletta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: bolletta [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cinzia: oddio [natural native speed]
Marco: my goodness, good grief, good Heavens, my God
Cinzia: oddio [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: oddio [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cinzia: pagare [natural native speed]
Marco: to pay
Cinzia: pagare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: pagare [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cinzia: entro [natural native speed]
Marco: within, by
Cinzia: entro [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: entro [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cinzia: giovedì [natural native speed]
Marco: Thursday
Cinzia: giovedì [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: giovedì [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cinzia: prossimo [natural native speed]
Marco: next, upcoming, forthcoming
Cinzia: prossimo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: prossimo [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Cinzia: The first word we will look at is
bolletta
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: È arrivata la bolletta del gas.
Marco: The gas bill has arrived.
Cinzia: The next word/expression we will look at is
oddio
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Oddio! Cosa ti è successo?
Marco: My God! What happened to you?
Cinzia: The next word/expression we will look at is
pagare
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Questa sera pago io.
Marco: This evening I'll pay.
Cinzia: The next word/expression we will look at is
entro
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Dobbiamo trovare una nuova casa entro domani.
Marco: We have to find a new house by tomorrow.
Cinzia: The next word/expression we will look at is
giovedì
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Giovedì ho un appuntamento con Marta.
Marco: Thursday I have a date with Marta.
Cinzia: Today's last word/expression is
prossimo
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: La prossima volta guido io.
Marco: Next time I’ll drive.

Lesson focus

Marco: Direct object pronouns are inserted right before the verb they are attached to in both simple and compound tenses. For example
Cinzia: Compro una macchina nuova di zecca. → La compro.
Marco: I buy a brand-new car. → I buy it.
Cinzia: Ho venduto la mia vecchia playstation. → L'ho venduta.
Marco: I sold my old playstation. → I sold it.
Cinzia: Ieri ho visto Mary e Anne. → Ieri le ho viste.
Marco: Yesterday I saw Mary and Anne. → Yesterday I saw them.
Marco: The third singular person direct object pronouns, lo (him) and la (her), drop their ending vowel before the auxiliary avere (to have) in compound tenses and add the apostrophe.
Cinzia: In contemporary Italian, the remaining direct object pronouns usually keep their ending vowels, though they may be dropped to achieve stylistic poetical effects.
Marco: Here are some examples
Cinzia: Ho abbracciato mio fratello. → L'ho abbracciato.
Marco: I hugged my brother. → I hugged him.
Cinzia: Avrei aiutato Marta. → L'avrei aiutata.
Marco: I would have helped Marta. → I would have helped her.
Cinzia: Hanno osservato loro figlia a lungo. → L'hanno osservata a lungo.
Marco: They looked at their daughter for a long time. → They looked at her for long time.
Cinzia: Serena ama me. → Serena mi ama/m'ama.
Marco: Serena loves me. → Serena loves me.
Cinzia: Marco ha invitato voi alla festa. → Marco vi ha/v'ha invitato alla festa.
Marco: Marco invited you to the party. → Marco invited you at the party.
Marco: As shown in the examples above, when using direct object pronouns in compound tenses, the past participle of the main verb agrees to the gender and number of the pronoun(s) it's attached to.
Cinzia: In negative statements, the particle non is positioned before direct object pronouns. Marco
Cinzia: Non ho aperto la porta. → Non l'ho aperta.
Marco: I didn't open the door. → I didn't open it.
Cinzia: Non prendo la caramella. → Non la prendo.
Marco: I don't take the candy. → I don't take it.
Cinzia: Non scrivo la lettera. → Non la scrivo.
Marco: I don't write the letter. → I don't write it.
Cinzia: When unstressed direct object pronouns refer to verb in its infinitive form, they are directly attached to it, obeying the following procedure
Marco: 1st - drop the ending vowel (e) of the infinitive
2nd - add the unstressed object pronouns
For instance
Cinzia: È opportuno aspettare Carla. → È opportuno aspettarla.
Marco: It's appropriate to wait for Carla. → It's appropriate to wait for her.
Cinzia: È salutare mangiare frutta. → È salutare mangiarla.
Marco: Eating fruit is healthy. → Eating it is healthy.
Cinzia: Dobbiamo andare a trovare Antonio e Luigi. → Dobbiamo andare a trovarli.
Marco: We need to go visit Antonio and Luigi. → We need to go visit them.

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today.
Marco: Okay, some of our listeners already know about the most powerful tool on ItalianPOD101.com....
Cinzia: line-by-line audio.
Marco: The perfect tool for rapidly improving listening comprehension...
Cinzia: by listening to lines of the conversation again and again.
Marco: Listen until every word and syllable becomes clear. Basically, we breakdown the dialog into comprehensible, bite-size sentences.
Cinzia: You can try the line-by-line audio in the Premium Learning Center at ItalianPOD101.com.
Marco: [ transition phrase ]
Marco: Arrivederci!
Cinzia: A presto!

20 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 12:57 AM
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Hi Jean-Pierre,

thanks for your question.

If you marked a lesson as "completed", you'll need to un-mark it. Just go to the lesson's page and click on Mark complete. When the green V becomes gray again, it means you successfully un-marked it.


I hope this helps!


Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

Jean-Pierre
Saturday at 06:06 PM
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Hi, I have a question - how can I revisit already completed lessons? I find that I forget too many things if I do not brush up regularly.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 04:17 PM
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Hi Tom and Karen,


"Mi dispiace non posso venire" is clear, but it's not grammatically correct. It should be either "Mi diapiace che non possa venire" (with the subjunctive mood) or "Mi dispiace non poter venire".


So you can have "mi dispiace che" + subjunctive,

or if the subject is the same "mi dispiace" + infinitive.


I hope this helps!:smile:

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Tomaso
Monday at 03:33 AM
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cia tutti.

First and foremost we love theleson notes. In fact we always review the dialogue in italian before listening.

On another note. we do not understand the use of poter the following flash card example sentence .

"mi dispiace non poter venire".


Is it the same as potere? Why use an infinitive vs conjugate it?


Why not just say. Mi dispiace non posso venire?


grazie mille.


Tom and karen

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 01:11 PM
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Hi everyone,


Thank you for posting.


@Erin, prego!


@Mehmet, good question!

When there’s a third person pronoun (”li”, “lo”, “la”, “le”, which indicate the object - not the subject) you have always to change the past participle according to the gender and the noun of the pronoun, even if the auxiliary verb is “avere”, “to have”.


Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Mehmet
Thursday at 06:49 PM
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Disregard my question. I got it.

I think verbs behave some kind of an adjective in this situation

Mehmet
Thursday at 06:06 PM
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Hello There


"Oddio non le ho ancora pagate"


Isn't this sentence is wrong? Past participle form of pagare is "Pagato"


Best regards

Erin
Tuesday at 11:13 PM
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Grazie Ofelia.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 01:17 PM
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Ciao Erin,


Thank you for posting!:smile:

Your plan sounds great!

Here are my answers:

1) I think it's more useful to learn more verbs in their "presente" and possibly also "passato prossimo" conjugation.

2) That's not easy, both are better :grin: Try to strengthen the grammar that you already know and to learn more vocabulary!

3) "Passato prossimo" is a compounded verb. It's made of an auxiliary verb ("avere" or "essere") followed by the main verb's past participle.


If you have more questions, feel free to post them!

Grazie!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Erin
Sunday at 10:28 PM
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Ciao Marco e Chinzia, I have studied 50+ lessons with you and doing well! I am traveling to Italy this year in December and I have 2 months left to study so I want to prioritize. I have 3 questions: 1) realistically with 2 months to study, is it more useful to learn MORE verbs but only the present tense conjugations, just to get by in conversation? Or do I really need to devote the time to learning fewer verbs but with 5-6 different tenses? 2) Is it more important to learn grammar or massive amounts of vocabulary to pick up words in conversation? 3) My 2nd language is Spanish and we learned the preterite tense (preterito) as the most important past tense. The first past tense we learned on this podcast was passato prossimo, which appears to me is more like a past participle, can you clarify? Thanks!