Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Hello everyone! I'm Consuelo, and welcome to ItalianPOD101.
Marco: With us, you'll learn to speak Italian with fun and effective lessons.
Consuelo: We also provide you with cultural insights
Marco: and tips you won't find in a textbook...
Marco: In today's class, we will see some of the most frequently used idiomatic expressions with the verb andare (to go). This conversation takes place at Martina's place.
Consuelo: The conversation is between Paolo, John, and Martina. The speakers are friends; therefore, they will be speaking informally.
Marco:
Consuelo:
Consuelo: Listeners...I have a question...
Marco: A question?
Consuelo: Yep, I want to know when was the last time you commented?
Marco: Ahh, yes! Great question.
Consuelo: Stop by ItalianPOD101.com, leave us a comment or just say hi.
Marco: haha...okay, you heard Consuelo.
Marco: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Paolo: Finito!
John: È stata un'impresa ma ce l'abbiamo fatta!
Paolo: Grazie John! Ora devo solo andare a chiamare Martina nell'altra stanza.
John: Ok dai, vai!
Paolo: Sono nervoso…come faccio?
John: Vai semplicemente di là e la chiami!
Paolo: Ma non saprei cosa dirle…dammi un'idea.
John: Invitala a bere qualcosa e con una scusa la porti qui.
Paolo: Hai ragione, farò così.
(Paolo esce)
Paolo: Ehi Martina…ti va di bere qualcosa?
Martina: Ah, grazie Paolo, ma come vedi sto già bevendo questa birra.
(Paolo torna da John)
Paolo: Non funziona! Aveva già da bere! Come posso fare ora?
John: Dille che vuoi farle sentire una canzone che sicuramente le piacerà, e invitala qui.
Paolo: Ok, ora provo. Tu non fare entrare nessuno mi raccomando!
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Paolo: Finito!
John: È stata un'impresa ma ce l'abbiamo fatta!
Paolo: Grazie John! Ora devo solo andare a chiamare Martina nell'altra stanza.
John: Ok dai, vai!
Paolo: Sono nervoso…come faccio?
John: Vai semplicemente di là e la chiami!
Paolo: Ma non saprei cosa dirle…dammi un'idea.
John: Invitala a bere qualcosa e con una scusa la porti qui.
Paolo: Hai ragione, farò così.
(Paolo esce)
Paolo: Ehi Martina…ti va di bere qualcosa?
Martina: Ah, grazie Paolo, ma come vedi sto già bevendo questa birra.
(Paolo torna da John)
Paolo: Non funziona! Aveva già da bere! Come posso fare ora?
John: Dille che vuoi farle sentire una canzone che sicuramente le piacerà, e invitala qui.
Paolo: Ok, ora provo. Tu non fare entrare nessuno mi raccomando!
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Paolo: Finito!
Marco: Finished!
John: È stata un'impresa ma ce l'abbiamo fatta!
Marco: It was a struggle, but we made it!
Paolo: Grazie John! Ora devo solo andare a chiamare Martina nell'altra stanza.
Marco: Thanks, John! Now I only have to go call Martina in the other room.
John: Ok dai, vai!
Marco: Okay, then go!
Paolo: Sono nervoso…come faccio?
Marco: I'm nervous…how can I do it?
John: Vai semplicemente di là e la chiami!
Marco: Simply go there and call her!
Paolo: Ma non saprei cosa dirle…dammi un'idea.
Marco: But I wouldn't know what to say...give me an idea.
John: Invitala a bere qualcosa e con una scusa la porti qui.
Marco: Invite her to drink something and then bring her here with an excuse.
Paolo: Hai ragione, farò così.
Marco: You're right. I'll do so.
Marco
(Paolo esce)
Marco(Paolo goes out)
Marco
Paolo: Ehi Martina…ti va di bere qualcosa?
Marco: Hey Martina...do you want to drink something?
Martina: Ah, grazie Paolo, ma come vedi sto già bevendo questa birra.
Marco: Ah, thanks, Paolo, but as you can see, I'm already drinking this beer.
Marco
(Paolo torna da John)
Marco(Paolo goes back to John)
Marco
Paolo: Non funziona! Aveva già da bere! Come posso fare ora?
Marco: It doesn't work! She already has a drink! What can I do now?
John: Dille che vuoi farle sentire una canzone che sicuramente le piacerà, e invitala qui.
Marco: Tell her you want to make her listen to a song that she will surely like and invite her here.
Paolo: Ok, ora provo. Tu non fare entrare nessuno mi raccomando!
Marco: Okay, I will try now. Please don't let anyone enter in this room!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: Cristiano, let's talk for once about excuses we can use to get to know girls (or boys, of course).
Cristiano: Eh eh, okay, that can be interesting.
Marco: What is the best pick-up line?
Cris: I think there's no such a thing.
Marco: What's your suggestion then?
Cris: My suggestion is…just be yourself (warm, normal voice). No, I'm kidding, but that's part of it.
Marco: An idea could be to use your sense of humor. Getting to know people is always nice and you shouldn't necessarily feel ashamed, right?
Cris: That's right! I remember once a friend of mine clearly showed his watch to this girl and then he asked her, ""Sorry, do you know what time it is?""
Marco: And what did she do?
Cris: She laughed, of course. And now they are married.
Marco: Wow! Usually I don't wear a watch…maybe I should buy one!
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Consuelo: impresa [natural native speed]
Marco: exploit, struggle
Consuelo: impresa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: impresa [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: chiamare [natural native speed]
Marco: to call
Consuelo: chiamare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: chiamare [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: stanza [natural native speed]
Marco: room
Consuelo: stanza [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: stanza [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: nervoso [natural native speed]
Marco: nervous, edgy, bad-tempered
Consuelo: nervoso [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: nervoso [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: semplicemente [natural native speed]
Marco: simply
Consuelo: semplicemente [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: semplicemente [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: idea [natural native speed]
Marco: idea, thought
Consuelo: idea [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: idea [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Marco: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases we learned in this lesson. The word we'll look at is...
Cris: ""reason""
Marco: ""ragione.""
Cris: Yes, ""ragione."" In Italian, to say ""you're right,"" we don't use the verb ""to be,"" but instead we say something that literally could be like ""you have reason.""
Marco: So how can we say ""you're right"" in Italian?
Cris: ""Hai ragione.""
Marco: ""You're right.""
Cris: I know, I'm right.
Marco: No, I meant the translation of ""hai ragione.""
Cris: Oh yes, you're right!

Lesson focus

Cristiano: Let's take a look at today's lesson.
Marco: The focus of this lesson is on some of the most frequently used idiomatic expressions with the verb
Cristiano: ""andare""
Marco: ""to go.""
The usage of the Italian irregular verb ""andare"" (""to go"") is similar to that of its English equivalent. For instance...
Cristiano: ""Vado a casa.""
Marco: ""I'm going home.""
Cris: ""Andiamo al cinema.""
Marco: ""We go to the cinema.""
Cris: ""Vanno al ristorante.""
Marco: ""They go to the restaurant.""
In addition, the verb ""andare"" is also used in various idiomatic expressions, such as the one used by Paolo when he asked Martina
Cris: ""ti va di bere qualcosa?""
Marco: ""Would you like to have a drink?"" The following are some of the most frequently used idiomatic expressions including the verb ""andare.""
Cris: ""Michele ha detto che Lucia si è lasciata andare."" (""lasciarsi andare"")
Marco: Literally, ""Michele said Lucia let herself go,"" meaning ""Michele said Lucia neglected herself.""
Cris: ""Io penso che Paolo e Martina vadano a braccetto."" (""andare a braccetto"")
Marco: Literally, ""I think Paolo and Martina go arm in arm,"" meaning ""I think Paolo and Martina get along very well.""
Cris: ""Il tuo progetto sta andando a gonfie vele!"" (""andare a gonfie vele"")
Marco: Literally, ""Your project is going in full sail!"" meaning ""Your project is going perfectly!""
Cris: ""Volevo andare in vacanza in Spagna, ma è andato tutto a monte/andato a rotoli."" (""andare a monte""/""andare a rotoli"")
Marco: Literally, ""I wanted to go on vacation in Spain, but it all went to the mountain,"" meaning ""I wanted to go on vacation in Spain, but it all fell through.""
Cris: ""Il nuovo iPod è andato a ruba."" (""andare a ruba"")
Marco: Literally, ""The new iPod went to robbery,"" meaning ""The new iPod sold like hot cakes.""
Cris: ""Quando cominciò il nuovo lavoro, Serena non sapeva dove andare a parare."" (""andare a parare"")
Marco: Literally, ""When she started the new job, Serena didn't know where to find shelter,"" meaning ""When Serena started the new job, she didn't know what to do.""
Marco: Let's note that the idiomatic expression
Cris: ""andare a parare""
Marco: is used exclusively in negative statements, mainly with the verb
Cris: ""sapere""
Marco: ""to know,"" followed by the adverb
Cris: ""dove""
Marco: ""where."" Now let's continue with a couple of other examples…
Cris: ""Il primo tentativo di raggiungere la luna andò a vuoto."" (""andare a vuoto"")
Marco: Literally, ""The first attempt to reach the moon went into emptiness,"" meaning ""The first attempt to reach the moon failed.""
Cris: ""Se io fossi in te, ci andrei coi piedi di piombo."" (""andare coi piedi di piombo"")
Marco: literally, ""If I were you, I'd go with leaden feet,"" meaning ""If I were you, I'd be very careful.""
Cris: ""La nostra ultima speranza di vittoria è andata in fumo. (andare in fumo)""
Marco: Literally, ""Our last hope to win went into smoke,"" meaning ""Our last hope to win dissolved into thin air.""
Cris: ""La mancanza di rispetto mi fa andare su tutte le furie."" (""andare su tutte le furie"")
Marco: Literally, ""Lack of respect makes me go on all furies,"" meaning ""Lack of respect stirs my anger.""

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today.
Consuelo: Ready to test what you just learned?
Marco: Make this lesson's vocabulary stick by using lesson specific flashcards in the learning center.
Consuelo: There is a reason everyone uses flashcards...
Marco: They work...
Consuelo: They really do help memorization.
Marco: You can get the flashcards for this lesson at
Consuelo: ItalianPod101.com.
Marco: Okay....
Marco: A presto!
Consuelo: Arrivederci!"

6 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:56 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Ciao Edmar,

Good phrase, but better to say "andiamo mano nella mano e lottiamo contro la povertà".


Chiara C.

Team ItalianPod101.com

Edmar
Tuesday at 03:16 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Andiamo a mano e lottiamo contro poverta'. Let us go hand in hand and fight poverty.

Chuck
Tuesday at 09:38 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Grazie per la riposta, Consuelo!

Consuelo
Tuesday at 05:19 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Ciao Chuck,


that's a good question!


In the dialogue John says "fatta" instead of "fatto" because in this case the "passato prossimo" is combined with a pronoun.


Please remember whenever occurs a "passato prossimo" verb combined with a pronoun the past participle follows gender and number of the pronoun.


In this case "l'" stands for "la", feminine singular pronoun that replaces the noun "cosa", thing (in English you say 'we made it', but in Italian there's no 'it', so we use "cosa" in cases like this). For this reason "fatto" switched into "fatta".


Another example:

Talking about "spaghettI". "Li ho mangiatI", I ate them.


Grazie per il commento,


Consuelo:grin:

Chuck
Monday at 11:31 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I am enjoying the story about John, Paolo and Martina!


In the dialogue, John says:


"È stata un'impresa ma ce l'abbiamo fatta!"


Why fatta and not fatto? I thought that with verbs that use avere to make the passato prossimo, the past participle doesn't need to change it's ending.