Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Marco: Hello, and welcome to the Newbie Series S2 at ItalianPOD101.com, where we study modern Italian in a fun, educational format!
Consuelo: So, brush up on the Italian that you started learning long ago, or start learning today.
Marco: Thanks for being here with us for this lesson. Consuelo, what are we looking at in this lesson.
Marco: In today's class, we will review Italian cardinal and ordinal numbers. This conversation takes place at Martina's place.
Consuelo: The conversation is between Paolo and John. The speakers are friends; therefore, they will be speaking informally.
Marco:
Consuelo:
Consuelo: [ Hello in Italian ] [ Hello! ], I'm Consuelo, and welcome to the Newbie Series S2 at ItalianPOD101.com.
Marco: This lesson is one part of the Newbie Series S2.
Consuelo: You can find the rest of the lessons at...
Marco: ItalianPOD101.com.
Marco: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
John: (ansimando) Ehi Paolo, come va coi palloncini, quanti te ne mancano?
Paolo: Ne ho ancora venti da gonfiare.
John: Io sono quasi alla fine.
Paolo: Bravo, grazie.
John: Niente, non ti preoccupare. Ma forse ho fatto troppo in fretta.
Paolo: Tutto ok?
John: Mi gira solo un pò la testa. Sono venticinque anni ma mi sento come se ne avessi settanta.
Paolo: Vuoi dire ""ho venticinque anni"", non ""sono"".
Johhn: Ah si, scusami! Ho venticinque anni.
Paolo: Se ti gira la testa puoi rallentare, tanto abbiamo tempo.
John: Ok allora.
Paolo: Sì, vai fuori e prendi un pò d'aria.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
John: (ansimando) Ehi Paolo, come va coi palloncini, quanti te ne mancano?
Paolo: Ne ho ancora venti da gonfiare.
John: Io sono quasi alla fine.
Paolo: Bravo, grazie.
John: Niente, non ti preoccupare. Ma forse ho fatto troppo in fretta.
Paolo: Tutto ok?
John: Mi gira solo un pò la testa. Sono venticinque anni ma mi sento come se ne avessi settanta.
Paolo: Vuoi dire ""ho venticinque anni"", non ""sono"".
Johhn: Ah si, scusami! Ho venticinque anni.
Paolo: Se ti gira la testa puoi rallentare, tanto abbiamo tempo.
John: Ok allora.
Paolo: Sì, vai fuori e prendi un pò d'aria.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
John: (ansimando) Ehi Paolo, come va coi palloncini, quanti te ne mancano?
Marco: (panting) Hey Paolo, how is it going with the balloons, how many do you have left?
Paolo: Ne ho ancora venti da gonfiare.
Marco: I still have twenty to blow up.
John: Io sono quasi alla fine.
Marco: I'm almost done.
Paolo: Bravo, grazie.
Marco: Good, thank you.
John: Niente, non ti preoccupare. Ma forse ho fatto troppo in fretta.
Marco: Nothing, never mind. But maybe I did it too fast.
Paolo: Tutto ok?
Marco: Is everything okay?
John: Mi gira solo un pò la testa. Sono venticinque anni ma mi sento come se ne avessi settanta.
Marco: I feel a bit dizzy. I have twenty-five years old, but I feel as if I were seventy.
Paolo: Vuoi dire ""ho venticinque anni"", non ""sono"".
Marco: You mean ""I am twenty-five,"" not ""I have.""
Johhn: Ah si, scusami! Ho venticinque anni.
Marco: Oh, yes, sorry! I am twenty-five years old.
Paolo: Se ti gira la testa puoi rallentare, tanto abbiamo tempo.
Marco: If you feel dizzy, you can slow down. We have time.
John: Ok allora.
Marco: Okay then.
Paolo: Sì, vai fuori e prendi un pò d'aria.
Marco: Yes, go out and get some air.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: You know, Cristiano, they say to blow up a balloon is a pretty difficult task.
Cristiano: And I just can't imagine how that would be with two hundred of them!
Marco: That should be hard.
Cris: But, is it that difficult?
Marco: I have a friend who once told me he has real trouble to inflate a balloon.
Cris: Wow! Why is that?
Marco: He has no problem with tying the balloon once blown up, but he couldn't get through the first part easily.
Cris: He could have used a pump!
Marco: Yes, but since it was his girlfriend's birthday party, we told him that the magic of the balloon is in the blowing. It has a person's breath trapped inside, to give it life.
Cris: So how many of them did he do?
Marco: Fifty!
Cris: Ouch!
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Consuelo: mancare [natural native speed]
Marco: to be lacking, missing
Consuelo: mancare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: mancare [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: fine [natural native speed]
Marco: end
Consuelo: fine [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: fine [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: preoccuparsi [natural native speed]
Marco: to worry
Consuelo: preoccuparsi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: preoccuparsi [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: fretta [natural native speed]
Marco: rush, hurry
Consuelo: fretta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: fretta [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: testa [natural native speed]
Marco: head
Consuelo: testa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: testa [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: girare [natural native speed]
Marco: to turn, go around, circle, wander
Consuelo: girare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: girare [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Marco: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases we learned in this lesson. The phrase we'll look at is....
Cris: ""avere venticinque anni""
Marco: ""to be twenty-five years old.""
Cris: Yes, Marco. Let's pay attention to the verb here. In English, we use ""to be"" to show people's age.
Marco: Yes, like ""I am thirty,"" ""he is twenty,"" and so on.
Cris: In Italian, the auxiliary verb used is ""to have.""
Marco: ""Io ho venti anni,"" ""io ho quaranta anni.""
Cris: Yes, and so on. Let's not forget it during our conversations!
Marco: Thanks, Cristiano!

Lesson focus

Marco: Let's take a look at today's lesson.
Cristiano: The focus of this lesson is on the cardinal and ordinal numbers.
Marco: When expressing age in Italian, we use the verb ""avere"" (""to have""), whereas in English we use ""essere"" (""to be"").
For example…
Cristiano: ""Io ho venti anni.""
Marco: ""I'm twenty years old.""
Cris: ""Noi abbiamo trent'anni.""
Marco: ""We are thirty years old.""
Cris: ""Loro hanno quindici anni.""
Marco: ""They are fifteen years old.""
Note that in the second sample sentence, the cardinal number
Cris: ""trenta""
Marco: ""thirty""
drops its ending vowel -a because it is followed by the word
Cris: ""anni""
Marco: ""years,""
which starts with the same vowel.
Marco: This written custom is to be employed whenever a cardinal number that ends with the vowel -a, is followed by the word ""anni."" This happens only with the following cardinal numbers
Cris: ""trenta""
Marco: ""thirty""
Cris: ""quaranta""
Marco: ""forty""
Cris: ""cinquanta""
Marco: ""fifty""
Cris: ""sessanta""
Marco: ""sixty""
Cris: ""settanta""
Marco: ""seventy""
Cris: ""ottanta""
Marco: ""eighty""
Cris: ""novanta""
Marco: ""ninety.""
Please note that the rule also applies when these numbers are used in compounds, such as
Cris: ""centotrenta""
Marco: ""one hundred thirty""
Cris: ""centoquaranta""
Marco: ""one hundred forty""
Cris: ""centocinquanta""
Marco: ""one hundred fifty, etc.""
For example…
Cris: ""Luigi ha quarant'anni.""
Marco: ""Luigi is forty years old.""
Cris: ""Loredana ha appena compiuto cinquant'anni.""
Marco: ""Loredana just turned fifty.""
Cris: ""La guerra terminò centocinquant'anni fa.""
Marco: ""The war ended one hundred fifty years ago.""
Marco: Contrary to English, when expressing time in Italian, we use the cardinal numbers rather than the ordinal. In addition, the first letter of months is always written in lower case. For example…
Cris: ""Oggi è il cinque maggio.""
Marco: literally, ""Today is five May,"" meaning ""Today is May the fifth.""
Cris: ""Le lezioni inizieranno il venti ottobre.""
Marco: literally, ""Lessons will start twenty October,"" meaning ""Lessons will start on October the twentieth.""
Cris: ""Ci vediamo il ventisei dicembre.""
Marco: literally, ""I'll see you on twenty-six December,"" meaning ""I'll see you on December the twenty-sixth.""
Marco: From the difference in usage that we have just seen, Italian ordinal numbers work exactly as their English counterparts. This means they are used to indicate a position within a given order, even when the limits of that order are not stated. For instance...
Cris: ""Il vostro posto è nella quinta fila.""
Marco: ""Your seat is in the fifth row.""
Cris: ""Questa è la terza volta che ti dico di pulire la tua camera!""
Marco: ""This is the third time I've told you to clean your room!""
Cris: ""Guardate la seconda immagine partendo dal basso.""
Marco: ""Take a look at the second picture, starting from the bottom.""

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today.
Marco: Consuelo, I'd like to share a study tip a listener shared with us.
Consuelo: Ahh, you're talking about the student who uses just the conversation tracks to review the lessons.
Marco: Consuelo, you read my mind.
Consuelo: (laughter)
Marco: Yep a listener of ours listens to each lesson several times,
Consuelo: Then afterward, get the conversation only track from our site.
Marco: She then listens to them on shuffle again and again. She created her own immersion program using ItalianPod101.com.
Consuelo: This is a great idea. Please give it a try and let us know what you think?
Marco: okay...
Marco: Arrivederci!
Consuelo: Ciao!"

16 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 03:32 PM
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Hi Michael,


I'll try to answer your questions.


1) "ne" is a pronoun basically meaning "of that", but according to the context it can get different meanings. You can check this lesson https://www.italianpod101.com/2011/11/07/absolute-beginner-s2-19-why-are-you-ruining-that-italian-dish/

When "ne" is combined with another pronoun, the vowel in the pronoun changes i=>e


2)"mancare" literally means "to miss", so “Quante fette di torta mancano?” actually means "How many slices of cake are missing?"


I hope this helps!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Michael
Tuesday at 02:44 AM
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Hi,


A few questions on the phrase "quanti te ne mancano?"


1) Why would this be "te ne" instead of "ti"? Will "ne" be covered in subsequent lessons? I see it popping up a lot and can't seem to get a grasp on what it means.


2) It seems that "mancare" is also used to mean something like "remaining", as it does in this sentence. Is that a common use? Could you say "Quante fette di torta mancano?" for "How many slices of cake are left"?


Grazie

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 01:26 PM
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Hi Heba Abed,


Thank you for your feedback.

Every lesson develops one or two grammar topics. If this lesson doesn't have an explanation about "imperfetto" is because the teacher thought it is not strictly necessary to study it at this point.

The same logic works for the vocabulary. In many cases, if the words are not directly related to the main topic, they are not listed.

Thank you for your understanding.

If you have more questions, please feel free to post them!


PS. You can also search randomly for topics and words from the "Search Lessons & Dictionaries" field, at the top right of the page.


Grazie,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Heba Abed
Friday at 03:22 AM
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Hello,


It would be great if you add the two new Italian verbs "rallentare" and "gonfiare" to the vocabulary list of this lesson. It would be also appreciated if you could possibly give us more explanation in the grammar point. I mean why do we use the imperfetto in a certain sentence and we use another tense in a different sentence.


Thank you:)

Doug
Monday at 09:03 PM
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Grazie mille Ofelia. Ora capisco

:smile:

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 08:55 PM
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Ciao Doug!


Literally "ci vediamo" means "let's see each other", so "let's meet" or "see you".

"us" is the pronoun and means "us", "each other".


I hope this helps!

Grazie mille e a presto!:thumbsup:

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Doug
Sunday at 11:40 PM
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Perche "ci vediamo" dire "I'll see you." Ho pensato "ci" e il pronomo indiretto per "us." It seems that it says "I'll see us."


Grazie per l'aiuto.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:58 AM
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Ciao Edmar,

Sei bravissimo! 19 is “diciannove”, “diciassette” is 17.


Chiara C.

Team ItalianPod101.com

Edmar
Tuesday at 03:02 PM
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Mi manca mia moglie. I miss my wife.


Avere quarant'anni significare che sei vecchio per i giovani ma sei giovane per i vecchi.

To be forty years old means you are young for the olds but you are old for the youngs.


Il mio compleanno e' il diciasette maggio. My birthday is May 19.

hamed
Sunday at 08:07 PM
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Thanks alot