Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Marco: Hello, and welcome to the Newbie Series S2 at ItalianPOD101.com, where we study modern Italian in a fun, educational format!
Cristiano: So, brush up on the Italian that you started learning long ago, or start learning today.
Marco: Thanks for being here with us for this lesson. Cristiano, what are we looking at in this lesson.
Marco: In this lesson, we will continue our study of Italian simple prepositions, delving into per. This conversation takes place at Martina's place.
Cristiano: The conversation is between Paolo and John. The speakers are friends; therefore, they will be speaking informally.
DIALOGUE
John: Ciao Paolo! Come va?
Paolo: Bene, grazie.
John: Martina ci ha detto che ci stavi aspettando.
Paolo: Sì, vi ho aspettato per mezz'ora circa, volevo chiederti un consiglio su una cosa.
John: Dimmi pure!
Paolo: Stasera parto per Roma, per lavoro, e volevo dirlo a Martina.
John: Cosa, per lavoro? E quando tornerai?
Paolo: Starò a Roma per circa un mese. Ma volevo chiederti. Tu ti intendi di dichiarazioni d'amore?
John: Eh? Per Martina??
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
John: Ciao Paolo! Come va?
Paolo: Bene, grazie.
John: Martina ci ha detto che ci stavi aspettando.
Paolo: Sì, vi ho aspettato per mezz'ora circa, volevo chiederti un consiglio su una cosa.
John: Dimmi pure!
Paolo: Stasera parto per Roma, per lavoro, e volevo dirlo a Martina.
John: Cosa, per lavoro? E quando tornerai?
Paolo: Starò a Roma per circa un mese. Ma volevo chiederti. Tu ti intendi di dichiarazioni d'amore?
John: Eh? Per Martina??
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
John: Ciao Paolo! Come va?
Marco: Hi Paolo! How is it going?
Paolo: Bene, grazie.
Marco: Fine, thank you.
John: Martina ci ha detto che ci stavi aspettando.
Marco: Martina told us you were waiting for us.
Paolo: Sì, vi ho aspettato per mezz'ora circa, volevo chiederti un consiglio su una cosa.
Marco: Yes, I've been waiting for you for about half an hour, I wanted to ask you a piece of advice about something.
John: Dimmi pure!
Marco: Tell me, what's the matter?
Paolo: Stasera parto per Roma, per lavoro, e volevo dirlo a Martina.
Marco: I will leave tonight for Rome, for work, and I wanted to tell it to Martina.
John: Cosa, per lavoro? E quando tornerai?
Marco: What, for work? And when will you be back?
Paolo: Starò a Roma per circa un mese. Ma volevo chiederti. Tu ti intendi di dichiarazioni d'amore?
Marco: I will be in Rome for about a month. But I wanted to ask you—are you familiar with declarations of love?
John: Eh? Per Martina??
Marco: Eh? For Martina??
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Consuelo: A declaration of love, how romantic!
Cristiano: Oh yes, a friend's party, some good background music, shining eyes willing only to grab that only moment that could change both the partners' lives forever.
Consuelo: Oh, yes, that's...
Cristiano (breaking in): Consuelo, may I tell you something?
Consuelo: Yes, tell me Cristiano, what happened, is it something I said?
Cristiano: No, it's just that, ehm…well, okay, never mind!
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Cristiano: chiedere [natural native speed]
Marco: to ask
Cristiano: chiedere [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristiano: chiedere [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristiano: consiglio [natural native speed]
Marco: advice
Cristiano: consiglio [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristiano: consiglio [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristiano: partire [natural native speed]
Marco: to leave, to start, to take off
Cristiano: partire [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristiano: partire [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristiano: tornare [natural native speed]
Marco: to go back, to come back, to get back
Cristiano: tornare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristiano: tornare [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristiano: dichiarazione [natural native speed]
Marco: statement, declaration, allegation
Cristiano: dichiarazione [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristiano: dichiarazione [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristiano: cosa [natural native speed]
Marco: thing, matter
Cristiano: cosa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristiano: cosa [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Marco: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases we learned in this lesson. The word we'll look at is...
Cris: ""intendersi""
Marco: ""to be familiar with.""
Cris: Yes Marco, but in Italian, it has way more meaning than just that!
Marco: For example?
Cris: Well, it basically means ""to understand each other,"" but it could mean ""have a good knowledge of.""
Marco: I've heard that this verb could have another, more sketchy meaning!
Cris: Oh, yes, it could mean ""to have a relationship with somebody.""
Marco: So the phrase ""te la intendi con Giulia?"" could be translated as ""do you have a relationship with Giulia?""
Cris: Exactly, Marco!

Lesson focus

The Focus of This Lesson Is on the Italian Preposition ""con.""
Cris: Let's take a look at today's grammar point.
Marco: Today we are going to continue with the study of the
Cris: ""preposizioni semplici""
Marco: ""simple prepositions.""
Cristiano: The focus of this lesson is on the Italian preposition ""per.""
Marco: The preposition ""per"" is used as follows…
to express movement, both real and figurative, that occurs through something. For example...
Cris: ""Siamo passati per la via più corta.""
Marco: ""We took the shortest route.""
Cris: ""Camminiamo per la piazza.""
Marco: ""We walk through the square.""
Cris: ""La sua mente vagò per molte vie.""
Marco: ""His mind wandered through many paths.""
Marco: The preposition ""per"" is also used to express the passing of time.
For example...
Cris: ""Ti ho pensato per molte settimane.""
Marco: ""I have been thinking about you for several weeks.""
Cris: ""Bisognerà lavorare per molti giorni.""
Marco: ""We'll have to work for several days.""
Cris: ""Vi hanno aspettato per pochi minuti.""
Marco: ""They waited for you a few minutes.""
Marco: The preposition ""per"" is also used to express the destination the subject is leaving for; it is particularly used with the verb ""partire"" (""to leave""). For instance...
Cris: ""Parto per Napoli.""
Marco: ""I'm leaving for Naples.""
Cris: ""Hai comprato il biglietto per Venezia?""
Marco: ""Have you bought the ticket to Venice?""
Cris: ""L'aereo è partito per la Francia.""
Marco: ""The airplane left for France.""
Marco: The preposition ""per"" could be also used to express the end, aim, or purpose on which something is done. For example...
Cris: ""Mi sono sposato per amore.""
Marco: ""I got married for love.""
Cris: ""L'ha detto per scherzare.""
Marco: ""He was joking.""
Cris: ""Non l'hai fatto per me.""
Marco: ""You didn't do it for me.""
Marco: Or when we want to say the cause, reason for which something happened. For example...
Cris: ""Il frullatore si è rotto per sfortuna.""
Marco: ""The blender broke down due to bad luck.""
Cris: ""Per mancanza di sensibilità, hai detto qualcosa di maleducato.""
Marco: ""You have been rude due to a lack of sensitivity.""
Cris: ""Apro la finestra per fare entrare aria fresca.""
Marco: ""I open the window to let fresh air come inside.""

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today.
Marco: Before we go, we want to tell you about a way to drastically improve your pronunciation.
Cristiano: The voice recording tool...
Marco: Yes, the voice recording tool in the premium learning center...
Cristiano: Record your voice with a click of a button,
Marco: and then play it back just as easily.
Cristiano: So you record your voice, and then listen to it.
Marco: Compare it to the native speakers...
Cristiano: And adjust your pronunciation!
Marco: This will help you improve your pronunciation fast!
Marco: Arrivederci!
Cristiano: Ciao!

16 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Tomaso
Friday at 03:47 AM
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Grazie, Ofelia


Followup question, how would you construct a sentence with an indirect object preceding the verb?

Non mi ti recordi ? (you do not remember me?)


Thanks!


Tom and Karen

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 12:49 PM
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Hi Tom and Karen,


"ti ricordi" is from the reflexive verb "ricordarsi", so it is necessary to use "ti" along with "ricordi".

"I remember" should be "mi ricordo", "we remember" should be "ci ricordiamo" and so on.


I hope this helps!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Tomaso
Monday at 04:18 AM
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Ciao tutti


We were doing flashcards and we do not understand "Non ti ricordi di me? strano."

"You don't remember me Strange."


Could you use "Non mi recordi" instead? Is the example a reflexive use of ricordare?


Grazie mille,


Tom and Karen

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 08:50 PM
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Ciao Antonio,


"Cosa" is equivalent to "what", while "come" is near to "how".

"Cosa hai detto?" means "What did you say?".

"Come stai?" means "How are you?".


Thank you!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Anthony
Sunday at 09:09 AM
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'Cosa vs come' as 'what' .. when would you use one over the other?


Antonio

Edmar
Tuesday at 01:42 PM
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Vai a Dau per SCTEX cosi' arrivare li' presto. Go to Dau via SCTEX to come there early.


Ho lavorato questo ufficio per diciasette anni. I worked in this office for 17 years.


Mia moglie e' partita per Roma. My wife left for Rome.


Posso studiare piu' per imparare velocemente. I must study more to learn fast.

Ken
Friday at 12:38 AM
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Would your example have been better had you written "Dovremo" instead of "Bisognerà"? Your sample sentence: "Bisognerà lavorare per molti giorni." I still am confused as to your translation of "We will have to work for many days." I understand that you can interpret the sentence as "It will be necessary to work for many days" and in that sense "We will have to work ...days." But you seem to indicate that native speakers would NOT use "bisognare".

My question, therefore is "Would most native speakers chose to say the sentence as you have it in the sample sentence (Bisognerà ... giorni"? Or, as you indicated in your response, would they chose the verb "dovere" and write "Dovremo lavorare per...giorni"?

I think that I will chose "dovremo".

Thanks! Ken

Jessi
Thursday at 10:26 AM
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Ken,

Good question! I asked our resident native speaker and here is what they had to say:


"Yes, grammatically speaking "Bisognerà" is third person, however if you want to say “He will have to work many days", most Italians will use the verb "dovere" (to have to,must,be obligated), ex."(Lui/Lei) dovrà lavorare per molti giorni".

We can say that "Bisognerà" refers to the "it" like the situation or the place like "(qui) bisognerà rifare il tetto" = "here will have to redo the roof" or "bisognerà partire al piu presto (per il meeting)" = "as for the meeting we'll have to leave as soon as possible". It's a little odd, but it's like omitting the subject and also addressing yourself or a crowd."


I hope this helps you out :smile:

Ken
Monday at 02:52 AM
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Una domanda: In the explanation of when to use "per" you have written the sample sentence: "Bisognerà lavorare per molti giorni." with the translation "We will have to work for many days." Should it be "He will have to work ... days"?

Marco
Tuesday at 03:16 PM
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Sorry for the mixup!