Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Marco: Hello, and welcome to the Newbie Series S2 at ItalianPOD101.com, where we study modern Italian in a fun, educational format!
Consuelo: So, brush up on the Italian that you started learning long ago, or start learning today.
Marco: Thanks for being here with us for this lesson. Consuelo, what are we looking at in this lesson.
Marco: In this lesson you will learn how to analyze preposizioni semplici, simple prepositions starting with a. This conversation takes place on the phone.
Consuelo: The conversation is between John and Laura. The speakers are friends, and therefore they will be speaking informally.
DIALOGUE
Laura: Che cosa vuoi fare questa sera?
John: Possiamo andare al cinema.
Laura: Ci sto! Ma non voglio fare troppo tardi.
John: L’ultimo spettacolo finisce alle ventitré e quarantacinque. Va bene?
Laura: È un po’ tardi. A che ora finisce quello prima?
John: Finisce alle ventidue e trenta.
Laura: OK! Non vedo l’ora!
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Laura: Che cosa vuoi fare questa sera?
John: Possiamo andare al cinema.
Laura: Ci sto! Ma non voglio fare troppo tardi.
John: L’ultimo spettacolo finisce alle ventitré e quarantacinque. Va bene?
Laura: È un po’ tardi. A che ora finisce quello prima?
John: Finisce alle ventidue e trenta.
Laura: OK! Non vedo l’ora!
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Laura: Che cosa vuoi fare questa sera?
Marco: What do you want to do tonight?
John: Possiamo andare al cinema.
Marco: We can go to the movies.
Laura: Ci sto! Ma non voglio fare troppo tardi.
Marco: I’m in! But I don’t want to be too late.
John: L’ultimo spettacolo finisce alle ventitré e quarantacinque. Va bene?
Marco: The last show ends at eleven forty-five. Is that okay?
Laura: È un po’ tardi. A che ora finisce quello prima?
Marco: It’s a little late. At what time does the previous one end?
John: Finisce alle ventidue e trenta.
Marco: It ends at ten thirty.
Laura: OK! Non vedo l’ora!
Marco: Okay! I can’t wait!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Consuelo: Did you ever buy an ""abbonamento?""
Marco: You mean a season ticket to a cinema?
Consuelo: Yes, exactly.
Marco: Actually I haven’t, but I’ve heard it’s rather cheap to buy an ""abbonamento.""
Consuelo: Yes it is! So if you really like going to the movies, drop by the nearest cinema and ask for the prices!
Marco: You can also see foreign movies with original sound!
Consuelo: Yes! Some movie theatres have special days in which original sound movies are shown.
Marco: If you’re in Italy, please enquire at the cinema’s ticket office!
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Consuelo: cinema [natural native speed]
Marco: cinema, movie theater
Consuelo: cinema [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: cinema [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: troppo [natural native speed]
Marco: too much
Consuelo: troppo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: troppo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: tardi [natural native speed]
Marco: late
Consuelo: tardi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: tardi [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: ultimo [natural native speed]
Marco: last, latest, farthest, final
Consuelo: ultimo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: ultimo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: spettacolo [natural native speed]
Marco: show, performance, sight
Consuelo: spettacolo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: spettacolo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: finire [natural native speed]
Marco: to finish, end, stop
Consuelo: finire [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: finire [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Marco: Let's have a closer look at the use of some of the words and phrases we learned in this lesson. The first word we’ll look at is…
Consuelo: spettacolo
Marco: show
Consuelo: In Italy, sometimes we use this word to mean that something incredible has happened.
Marco: For example...?
Consuelo: For example, at our first sight of beautiful scenery, we might say, ""Che spettacolo!""
Marco: Meaning, ""Wow! That’s so beautiful!""
Consuelo: So let’s close our eyes and imagine we have in front of us the Basilica di San Pietro.
Marco: St. Peter’s Basilica.
Consuelo: What would we be thinking?
Marco: ""Che spettacolo!"" of course!

Lesson focus

Marco: Let’s take a look at today’s grammar point.
Consuelo: We are going to look at Italian prepositions.
Marco: Although the translation of prepositions might seem simple at a first glance, they cannot be translated as independent elements.
Consuelo: Very true. Italian prepositions depend on both the verb they are used with and the meaning of the following object.
Marco: Now let’s look at them in more detail.
Consuelo: Italian prepositions are divided into four main categories.
Consuelo: preposizioni semplici
Marco: simple prepositions
Consuelo: preposizioni articolate
Marco: compound prepositions
Consuelo: preposizioni improprie
Marco: improper prepositions
Consuelo: locuzioni preposizionali
Marco: prepositional phrases
Consuelo: They have rather long and scary names.
Marco: But don’t worry, dear listeners. You only have to study them. Then like all grammar related things, we bury them under daily usage.
Consuelo: That’s reassuring.
Marco: Today we will start working on the
Consuelo: preposizioni semplici
Marco: simple prepositions
They are...
Consuelo: di; a; da; in; con; su; per; tra; fra
Marco: Use the simple preposition a when the proposition is before indirect objects. In this case, it translates as ""to."" For example...
Consuelo: Ho dato lo zaino a Luca.
Marco: I gave the schoolbag to Luca.
Consuelo: Avete prestato a Maria la vostra macchina?
Marco: Did you lend your car to Maria?
Consuelo: Abbiamo scritto a John.
Marco: We wrote to John.
Marco: Also use the simple preposition to express time.
Consuelo: In this case, place the proposition before the hours.
Marco: We must also tell you that you combine the preposition with the plural feminine definite article, le, creating the compound preposition, alle.
Consuelo: Marco! Wait! You are forgetting that there are exceptions to this rule.
Marco: Well don’t make our listeners and me wait! Tell us!
Consuelo: Okay, okay. The exceptions are for mezzogiorno (""noon""), mezzanotte (""midnight""), and una (""one""). In these cases, we use the simple a.
Marco: And the ""a"" translates as ""at.""
For example...
Consuelo: Ci vediamo alle cinque e mezza.
Marco: I’ll see you at 5.30 p.m.
Consuelo: Lo spettacolo termina a mezzanotte/mezzogiorno.
Marco: The show ends at midnight/noon.
Consuelo: Loro di solito pranzano all’una in punto.
Marco: They usually have lunch at one o’clock.
Marco: Let’s now take a look at the last case.
Consuelo: Yes, the last case is inserting the preposition before complementi di luogo.
Marco: places or locations to which the action is directed.
Consuelo: In this case, the preposition, a, translates differently according to the verb you use it with.
Marco: For instance
Consuelo: Andiamo a casa.
Marco: We go home.
Consuelo: Il treno è arrivato a New York.
Marco: The train arrived in New York.
Consuelo: Devi andare dritto e poi girare a destra.
Marco: You have to go straight ahead and then turn right.

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today.
Consuelo: Ready to test what you just learned?
Marco: Make this lesson's vocabulary stick by using lesson specific flashcards in the learning center.
Consuelo: There is a reason everyone uses flashcards...
Marco: They work...
Consuelo: They really do help memorization.
Marco: You can get the flashcards for this lesson at
Consuelo: ItalianPod101.com.
Marco: Okay....
Marco:
Consuelo: "

5 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 05:43 PM
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Hi everyone,


Thank you for posting!


@Jay, thank you for the suggestion! Maybe one day we'll do :smile:

@Tom and Karen, "Non vedo l'ora" is an idiom which means "I'm looking forward to" or "I can't wait to."


A presto,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Tomaso
Wednesday at 05:36 AM
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Ciao tutti,


We have a question about today's conversation. "OK! Non vedo l’ora!" got translated "Okay! I can’t wait!


When we read it we expected it to be something like "ok, I won't see it now". Can you please explain?

Siamo confusati :D


Grazie mille,


Tom and Karen

hamed
Saturday at 05:26 PM
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thank you

Jay
Sunday at 06:17 PM
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ah I can't stop listening! Ipod101 you guys are great :mrgreen:


Just a suggestion, is there any chance the whole Italianpod team can do a video for the most common hand gestures used in Italy daily? That would definitley help for anyone wanting to visit Italy presto!



State molto gentile per avete fatto questo sito internet :grin: