Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Cinzia: Buon giorno! Mi chiamo Cinzia.
Marco: Marco here. Newbie Series, season 1, lesson #9 - You Might End Up Anywhere in the World! Buon giorno a tutti! Hello and welcome to the Newbie Series of Italianpod101.com. My name is Marco and I am joined here by Cinzia.
This series focuses on the essentials of Italian for anyone who wants to start learning.
Cinzia: So our dear listeners, join us for this lesson on Italianpod101.com.
Marco: The focus of this lesson is on Italian singular definite articles.
Cinzia: This conversation takes place in the countryside during a picnic.
Marco: And it is between Laura Rossi and John Smith.
Cinzia: The speakers are friends, therefore they will be speaking informal Italian.
DIALOGUE
Laura: John vorrei il panino al prosciutto.
John: Eccolo. Io voglio la panna cotta.
Laura: Sei un goloso!
Marco: one more time, slowly.
Laura: John vorrei il panino al prosciutto.
John: Eccolo. Io voglio la panna cotta.
Laura: Sei un goloso!
Marco: Once again, this time, with the translation.
Laura: John vorrei il panino al prosciutto.
Marco: John, I would like to have the ham sandwich.
John: Eccolo. Io voglio la panna cotta.
Marco: Here it is. I want panna cotta (literally, baked cream).
Laura: Sei un goloso!
Marco: Oh, you are a gluttonous one!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: And yes, for all the listeners out there, I am a goloso!
Cinzia: Really? You didn't seem very happy today, when I brought you my cake.
Marco: Well, I was busy, setting up everything...
Cinzia: You didn't even open it!
Marco: I know I know. The truth is that I was afraid that you baked it!
Cinzia: Oh! Marco! I can't believe you just said that! You know I come from Napoli, Marco! You know I can cook! Well, ok, I bought the cake today!
Marco: You mean today's cake is from a shop?
Cinzia: Yes.
Marco: Ok, I'll go eat it now.
Cinzia: So so for it!
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let’s take a look at today’s vocabulary.
Marco: First
Cinzia: panino [natural native speed]
Marco: sandwich
Cinzia: panino [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: panino [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: Eccolo [natural native speed]
Marco: Here it is
Cinzia: Eccolo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: Eccolo [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: prosciutto [natural native speed]
Marco: ham
Cinzia: prosciutto [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: prosciutto [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: la [natural native speed]
Marco: the (feminine singular)
Cinzia: la [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: la [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: il [natural native speed]
Marco: the (masculine singular)
Cinzia: il [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: il [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: panna cotta [natural native speed]
Marco: panna cotta (literally “baked cream”)
Cinzia: panna cotta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: panna cotta [natural native speed]
Marco: Last word
Cinzia: goloso [natural native speed]
Marco: gluttonous
Cinzia: goloso [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: goloso [natural native speed]
Marco: Now, I think our listeners are now wondering why la and il are the same “the”.
Cinzia: We’re gonna cover that in the grammar section.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Cinzia: Let’s have a look at the usage for some of the words and expressions. The first expressions we will look at is Eccolo.
Marco: Cinzia, can you give us an example sentence please?
Cinzia: Mi passi il Parmigiano per favore?
Marco: Certo, eccolo!
Marco: Pass me the Parmesan cheese please?
Cinzia: Sure, here it is!
Cinzia: OK. The next vocabulary word is prosciutto.
Marco: Let’s have an example
Cinzia: Il prosciutto cotto è buono.
Marco: Ham is good. Cinzia... why do we say prosciutto cotto? What's the difference between prosciutto and prosciutto cotto?
Cinzia: It's for making a distinction between prosciutto cotto and prosciutto crudo which is the one I prefer!
Marco: So exactly what is prosciutto crudo?
Cinzia: Prosciutto crudo is the red one and prosciutto cotto is the red one! It's easy!
Marco: Ok, so... prosciutto crudo means...
Cinzia: ahaha!
Marco: Now, for all our listeners prosciutto crudo is actually non cooked ham, crudo means raw, and the most famous is Parma ham.
Cinzia: Buono!
Marco: Molto buono! Very good, well the usual prosciutto is the cooked ham, the pink one, like Cinzia pointed out.
Cinzia: prosciutto crudo is the red one, and prosciutto cotto is the pink one.
Cinzia: OK the next word is la.
Marco: One example please.
Cinzia: La casa rossa.
Marco: The red house.
Cinzia: The next word we will see is Panna cotta.
Marco: And the example is?
Cinzia: La panna cotta è un dolce italiano.
Marco: Panna cotta is an Italian dessert.
Cinzia: The last word for today is goloso. And obviously all our listeners know who I'm talking about.
Marco: yes yes yes, she is talking about me. And remember if we are talking about Cinzia we have to change the adjectives ending to feminine, so Cinzia è molto golosa. Cinzia is very gluttonous.
Cinzia: E Marco è più goloso di me.
Marco: And Marco is well you translate that
Cinzia: And Marco is more gluttonous than me.
Marco: OK ok ok, but now everybody be careful because goloso doesn’t have this negative image as it is in English, gluttonous is not such a nice adjective, is it?
Cinzia: No, it isn’t.
Marco: But goloso you can hear it often in Italy can’t you?
Cinzia: Yes of course
Marco: I mean if you tell me goloso I don’t get angry do I?
Cinzia: No why should you?
Marco: Because maybe goloso is just someone who likes to eat good food.
Cinzia: Yes.
Marco: And who doesn’t like to eat good food?
Cinzia: Especially food from Napoli
Marco: Yes, on to the grammar.

Lesson focus

Marco: Now as we have briefly mentioned in our previous lesson, definite articles correspond to the English counterpart “the”.
Cinzia: As in English, they are employed to identify one or more specific nouns.
Marco: As for the indefinite articles, proper nouns are due to their very definition already specific, therefore they cannot be preceded by any kind of article.
Cinzia: For example, saying il John.
Marco: The John.
Cinzia: Or un John.
Marco: A John.
Cinzia: Would not make any sense, since there can be only one individual named John.
Marco: And one girl named Cinzia!
Cinzia: Of course!
Marco: Ok then, let us take a closer look at the Definite Italian articles. But only the singular form, in our next lesson we shall see the plural form.
Cinzia: Use il before masculine nouns starting with a consonant. For example, il cane "the dog".
Marco: L + apostrophe before masculine nouns starting with vowels. For example, l’albero “the tree”.
Cinzia: Lo before masculine nouns starting with z, y or s + consonants
Marco: For example, lo zaffiro “the sapphire”; lo studente “the student”; lo yogurt “the yogurt”.
Cinzia: Use la before feminine nouns starting with a consonant, including z, y or s + consonants.
Marco: For example, la ragazza “the girl”; la strada “the road”.
Cinzia: L + apostrophe before feminine nouns starting with vowels. For example, l’uva “the grapes”.
Marco: That was a long grammar section
Cinzia: Yes, I hope we didn’t loose any listeners because of this.
Marco: Well I could tell a joke.
Cinzia: You a joke??? You’d make them cry.
Marco: My jokes aren’t that bad.
Cinzia: Come on, only you laugh at them, and usually you laugh even before you finished telling the joke!!!
Marco: OK then. This will conclude today’s lesson.
Cinzia: Scusa! Ahahahaahah

Outro

Cinzia: Be sure to pick up the PDF at Italianpod101.com.
Marco: Also, if you have any questions, feel free to use our forum or comment on today’s lesson.
Cinzia: See you again tomorrow, a domani!
Marco: Ciao, a domani!

19 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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What a long picnic! Well we Italians like to take our meals slowly. What about you? Do you also take your time to savor pasta?

ItalianPod101.com
Wednesday at 10:26 AM
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Hi Nadia,


Prego! You are welcome! 😄


Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Nadia
Sunday at 07:13 PM
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Thank you for the explanation re: Ecco & Eccolo - that’s really helpful.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 09:35 AM
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Hi Nadia,


You can use "ecco" in any situation, but you can use "eccolo" only when referring to something singular and masculine, because "-lo" literally means "it" or "him."

For example, you can use "eccolo" when referring to a (male) friend who you were waiting for and just appeared in the distance. In such context "eccolo" would mean "here he is" or "there he is."


I hope this helps!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Nadia
Sunday at 09:43 PM
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Hi there!


Can you please explain what the difference is between ecco and eccolo? They both seem to translate to “here it is”... are they used at different times?


Thank you

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 05:23 PM
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Ciao sasha,


Thanks for the suggestion. We'll keep your good suggestions in mind.


The post was deleted!

Regards,

Erica

Team ItalianPod101.com

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 05:20 PM
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Ciao tracy,


Thanks for posting. We will consider that. We are always developing our content so that it will be easier for listeners to use and access them. Thanks for the suggestion!


Regards,

Erica

Team ItalianPod101.com

sasha
Sunday at 02:39 AM
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I loveee this method of learning.


Do you think you can search for a way to display the pdf content in the same browser without having to open an independent tool. It would be great, specially for the grammar section, to be able to hear the voices at the same time that we see the pdf content.


PD: please erase the previous post because it displays my email. Thanks

Tracy
Friday at 09:09 PM
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Love this.


But you sooo fast, especially in the grammar. I have to replay it over and over.

Also, when you first start the video you say a phrase, and then say it in slow motion. Don't you think it would be easier to say it, then tell us what it is and then say it in slow motion?

Eve
Friday at 06:19 AM
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Ehi, voglio ascoltare lo scherzo di Marco! Per piacere!:lol:

Consuelo
Tuesday at 10:56 AM
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Ciao Judi,

very good question.

In Italian some colors do not change their form like normal adjectives do, these means that they do not agree with the nouns. These colors are: "rosa" (pink), "viola" (purple), "blu" (blue), "fucsia" (fuchsia).


Buona giornata,


Consuelo