Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Marco: Buon giorno! Mi chiamo Marco.
Cinzia: Cinzia here!
Marco: Marco here. Newbie series season 1, lesson 6 - How Many Cups of Espresso Have You Had?
Cinzia: Buon giorno a tutti!
Marco: Hello and welcome to Italianpod101.com. My name is Marco and I am joined here by Cinzia. Come stai Cinzia?
Cinzia: Who else would it be Marco?
Marco: Anna? No, no just joking, she's just a name we invented, so don't worry
Cinzia: You know I'm the only one.
Marco: Yes... For now, for now... anyway... Come stai Cinzia?
Cinzia: Benissimo, grazie. Today we have the sixth lesson of our Newbie Series.
Marco: This series focuses on the essentials of Italian for anyone who wants to start learning.
Cinzia: So join us for this lesson of Italianpod101.com.
Marco: The focus of this lesson is how to ask the age of other persons, we shall also see the gender, and number of Italian nouns.
Cinzia: This conversation takes place at an Italian park.
Marco: And it is between Laura Rossi and John Smith.
Cinzia: And they will be speaking informal Italian.
Marco: So Cinzia we are going to ask the age of other people in this lesson, but we still don’t know your age.
Cinzia: Marco, didn’t you read the culture insight in the last lesson?
Marco: Why? Did it talk about you age?
Cinzia: Che dici Marco! It says it is rude to ask a girl her age.
Marco: Yes ,you are right, but I was thinking the people out there were wondering what it was.
Cinzia: Well, it’s on the page with our profiles.
Marco: Yes, find our profiles in the Meet The Staff page by accessing the About Us link on the home page.
Cinzia: Well then let’s get going!
Marco: Ok then.
Cinzia: Take your studies to the next level by stopping by the Learning Center at Italianpod101.com.
Marco: Ok let’s start. I will be the usual John Smith, while Cinzia will be…
Cinzia: the usual, Laura Rossi.
DIALOGUE
Laura: Quanti anni ha Mike?
John: Mike ha ventisette anni.
Laura: Davvero?
Marco: one more time, slowly.
Laura: Quanti anni ha Mike?
John: Mike ha ventisette anni.
Laura: Davvero?
Marco: Once again, this time, with the translation.
Laura: Quanti anni ha Mike?
Marco: How old is Mike?
John: Mike ha ventisette anni.
Marco: Mike is twenty-seven years old.
Laura: Davvero?
Marco: Really?
Marco: In the bonus track, we have a conversation using third person plural hanno, “they have”.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Cinzia: So Marco, this time I’m gonna ask you, what do you think of this conversation?
Marco: Well, it seems simple to me. What do you think?
Cinzia: I think it's confusing here, because we don't know if Mike is the person who you're talking to or just another Mike.
Marco: I see, I see... So it could be me and you talking about a third person Mike, or you talking to me and I am Mike!
Cinzia: Yes, and this one is our case, so quanti anni ha Mike? it means that I am asking you how old is another person.
Marco: Got it, got it, perfect explanation Cinzia, thank you.
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Now we’ll take a look at a very short vocabulary list for this lesson.
Marco: First
Cinzia: davvero [natural native speed]
Marco: really
Cinzia: davvero [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: davvero [natural native speed]
Marco: next word
Cinzia: giovane / giovani [natural native speed]
Marco: young
Cinzia: giovane / giovani [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: giovane / giovani [natural native speed]
Marco: So Cinzia, why do we have giovane and giovani? I mean, two words that mean “young”. Cinzia: Yes, actually this gets confusing because we have singular and plural for “young”.
Marco: So, giovane and giovani will be found in the bonus track and regarding the two cases, giovane (singular) and giovani (plural), we will see it in the following grammar section.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Cinzia: Let’s have a look at the usage for some of the words. The first word we will look at is [davvero].
Marco: Cinzia, can you give us an example sentence please?
Cinzia: Ho davvero fame.
Marco: “I am really hungry.”
In this example phrase we use davvero adverb, to modify fame, meaning really hungry. The usage is a little bit different from what we had in the dialog. The dialog’s davvero is the really, is it so meaning
Cinzia: In fact when I am surprised by something I say Davvero? Which is really? Is that so?
Marco: What about…the difference between maybe davvero? and davvero?, this difference in intonations changes the meaning, doesn't it?
Cinzia: Yes, true Marco, because when you say davvero? you are asking in a certain way a confirmation, but in the other case, if you say davvero! it means that you are confirming something.
Marco: So davvero? question is it true, really?
Cinzia: Or Davvero. yes it is true, I confirm it.
Marco: Ok then, this wraps it up for the vocabulary usage.

Lesson focus

Marco: We have a very long grammar topic, so let’s jump right into it.
Cinzia: You and your grammar, Marco! But yes, we have to see this topic.
Marco: Italian nouns have both gender (feminine and masculine) and number (singular and plural).
Cinzia: In the dialog we have seen anni, “years”, and its singular form is anno, “year”.
Marco: Because its singular form ends in -o, it is a masculine noun. The following is a short explanation delineating the gender of Italian nouns according to their ending vowel. Please pay attention.
Cinzia: Delineating? Marco, we’re just gonna read them.
Marco: Ok then, let’s start reading.
Marco: In their singular form, when Italian nouns end in -o, the majority of the nouns are masculine. For example, masculine: anno “year”, tavolo “table”, libro “book”.
Marco: But sometimes, we have a feminine, mano “hand”. But we don’t have so many, let’s say around 90% male? Any way, it’s a language, so it changes in time, never be too strict on numbers.
Marco: Then when Italian nouns end in -a, the majority of the nouns are feminine. Let’s see the feminine: sedia “chair”, giacca “jacket”, tazza “cup”.
Marco: But sometimes, we have some masculine nouns that end in -a: tema “theme”.
Finally, in their singular form, when Italian nouns end in -e, about half are masculine and half are feminine. In the masculine case: pallone “soccer ball”, dente “tooth”, bicchiere “glass”.
And in the feminine case: televisione “television”, voce “voice”, patente “license”.
Marco: So this is a little bit tricky isn't it?
Cinzia: Yes Marco, but we will help our listeners, won't we?
Marco: Yes we will, but they have to listen to this carefully, and now we will start with the plural form.
Cinzia: Please, pay attention!
Marco: Yes, it's Cinzia teacher here, and she gets very angry if you don't. In their plural form Italian nouns change ending in the following manner. If the singular was -o, the plural would be –i for both genders.
Masculine case: anni “years”, tavoli “tables”, libri “books”
Feminine case: mani “hands”
In the case of nouns that end in -a in the singular form, we have feminine plural, -e.
For example: sedie “chairs”, giacche “jackets”, tazze “cups”
In this case, masculine nouns with their singular form ending in -a, have their masculine plural in -i. For example, temi “themes”.
And now, let’s take a look at nouns that end in -e, in the singular form, the end changes to -i for both genders. So it’s very easy, it’s the easiest case. For example, masculine case: palloni “soccer balls”, denti “teeth”, bicchieri “glasses”. And the feminine case: televisioni “televisions”, voci “voices”, patenti “licenses”
Marco: So as you might have seen the plural is actually very easy, isn't it Cinzia?
Cinzia: Yes Marco, it's true! In fact the majority of the plural words end in -I, pronounced I in Italian.
Marco: So only feminine plurals of nouns that end in -A change to -E, pronounced in Italian E.
Cinzia: So Marco, how do Italians know the difference between masculine and feminine nouns?
Marco: Well certainly using them every day they know them by heart, but also because the Italian articles help them.
Cinzia: We shall see the articles in future lessons.
Marco: Yes and to recap a very important aspect remember that because Italian nouns have gender and number also adjectives must have them, this is because they follow nouns.
Cinzia: In the dialog we have seen quanti anni, where the adjective quanto changes to its masculine plural form to match anno, in its plural form anni. Uff, che fatica!
Marco: That was tough! And it really was!

Outro

Cinzia: That just about does it for today's lesson.
Marco: Make sure you check out the Grammar Point in this lesson's PDF, which you can pick up at Italianpod101.com.
Cinzia: There's a wealth of student resources there, just waiting for you.
Marco: So have a nice day!
Cinzia: Buona giornata!

Dialogue - Informal

Dialogue - Informal 2

23 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Do you usually ask someone's age the first time you meet?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:44 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Ciao Inji Saleh,


Cinzia says, "quanto" changes into "quanti" to match "anno" in its plural plural form "anni".


I hope this helps!

A presto!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Inji Saleh
Saturday at 08:13 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Ciao,

Please that statement cinzia says at time 11:07, what is it ?

Grazie.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 11:06 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Mai,


Italian men always ask your age?! That's not very kind of them!!It's a very bad manner! You can refuse to answer;)


A presto,

Chiara

Team ItalianPod101.com

Mai
Thursday at 01:21 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Italian men seem to always ask my age. How is so? but I thought this lesson is how to order espresso??

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 07:04 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Cynthia,

I'm sorry to hear that you find the titles of the lessons misleading. Well try to be more careful and tailor the titles better.

A presto,

Chiara

Team ItalianPod101.com

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:44 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Natalie,

Thank you for leaving your message.

Buono studio,

Chiara

Team ItalianPod101.com

natalie
Tuesday at 01:12 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Grazie per le lezioni Newbie 1. Il mio italiano e molto migliore, grazie a tutti

Cynthia
Monday at 08:34 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

This lesson had nothing to do with how many cups of espresso anyone had; the opening paragraph is very misleading. Just like the previous lesson had nothing to do with why the conversation got quiet after asking a woman if she is married. Do Marco & Cinzia even read those opening paragraphs? It is not very consistent at all! :???:

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 11:27 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Ciao Bendeb!!

Challenge is good, but I'm sure you can also have fun with our dialogues and lessons.

:wink:


Grazie mille per il commento!


Cosuelo


Team ItalianPod101.com

Bendeb
Sunday at 12:23 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

This lesson is a bit of a challenge for me. You are really making me concentrate. I love it. :razz: