Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Cinzia: Ciao a tutti!
Marco: Marco here. Newbie Series, season 1, lesson#37 - Who Knows Whether We Will Be in Italy in Ten Years' Time.
Cinzia: Hi everyone! I'm Cinzia, and welcome to ItalianPOD101.
Marco: With us, you'll learn to speak Italian with fun and effective lessons.
Cinzia: We also provide you with cultural insights
Marco: and tips you won't find in a textbook.
Marco: In this lesson you will learn about the Futuro Semplice tense of the verbs essere, “to be”, and avere, “to have”.
Cinzia: This conversation takes place at a café.
Marco: The conversation is between John and Anna.
Cinzia: The speakers are friends, therefore the speakers will be speaking informal Italian.
Marco: Now, if you're listening on an iPod...
Cinzia: or an iTouch or iPhone...
Marco: click the center button of the iPod or tap the screen on an iTouch or iPhone, to see the notes for this lesson while you listen!
Cinzia: Read along, while you listen.
Marco: This technique will help you remember faster! Okay...
Marco: Let's listen to the conversation now.
DIALOGUE
John: Chissà dove saremo fra dieci anni.
Laura: Io sarò ancora qui a Bologna e tu sarai a New York.
John: Sì, sarò a New York e avrò una casa piccola piccola.
John: Tu invece avrai una casa in campagna.
Laura: E avrò un grande mutuo da pagare!
Marco: Let’s hear it slowly now.
John: Chissà dove saremo fra dieci anni.
Laura: Io sarò ancora qui a Bologna e tu sarai a New York.
John: Sì, sarò a New York e avrò una casa piccola piccola.
John: Tu invece avrai una casa in campagna.
Laura: E avrò un grande mutuo da pagare!
Marco: And now, with the translation.
John: Chissà dove saremo fra dieci anni.
Marco: Who knows where we will be in ten years' time.
Laura: Io sarò ancora qui a Bologna e tu sarai a New York.
Marco: I will still be here in Bologna, and you will be in New York.
John: Sì, sarò a New York e avrò una casa piccola piccola.
Marco: Yes, I will be in New York and will have a tiny, tiny house.
John: Tu invece avrai una casa in campagna.
Marco: Instead, you will have a house in the countryside.
Laura: E avrò un grande mutuo da pagare!
Marco: And I will have a big mortgage to pay!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: Chissà dove saremo domani?
Cinzia: Marco, of course we’ll be here at Italianpod101.com.
Marco: Yes, we will certainly be here tomorrow as well!
Cinzia: Yes, and we will be having fun!
Marco: Are you sure?
Cinzia: Oh my god, what happened to him?
Marco: Thinking about the future, pensando al futuro.
Cinzia: Ok, listeners, please, pay attention just to me, ok?
Marco: Yes, only to Cinzia.
Cinzia: In the dialog we have seen a very interesting repetition, which was piccola piccola.
Marco: In English, which means “tiny tiny”.
Cinzia: Oh he’s awake now.
Marco:Yay.
Cinzia: We often use this kind of repetition to strengthen the meaning of an adjective.
Marco: So can I say "buono buono" when I want to stress it is something really good to eat?
Cinzia: Sure! But be careful on the tone.
Marco: I have to stress it right?
Cinzia: yes if you say buono buono, it doesn't feel as if it is really good.
Marco: That is very useful advice. So I should say buono buono, faster rhythm, right?
Cinzia: Bello bello!
Marco: Because if I say bello bello it sounds the opposite.
Cinzia: Yes, of course.
Marco: It sounds ironic.
Cinzia: Yes, it sounds ironic. So listeners, please pay attention, and if you want to use this repetition, just do it with the right rhythm, just to mark meaning of the adjective.
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Today’s first word is
Cinzia: chissà [natural native speed]
Marco: who knows
Cinzia: chissà [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: chissà [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: fra [natural native speed]
Marco: in (period) time
Cinzia: fra [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: fra [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: ancora [natural native speed]
Marco: still, yet, again
Cinzia: ancora [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: ancora [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: invece [natural native speed]
Marco: instead
Cinzia: invece [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: invece [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: campagna [natural native speed]
Marco: countryside
Cinzia: campagna [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: campagna [natural native speed]
Marco: Today’s last word is
Cinzia: mutuo [natural native speed]
Marco: mortgage
Cinzia: mutuo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: mutuo [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Cinzia: The first word we will look at is chissà.
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Chissà quando parte Luca.
Marco: Who knows when Luca will leave.
Cinzia: The next word is fra.
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Ci vediamo fra mezzora.
Marco: I’ll see you in half an hour.
Cinzia: The nexy word we will look at is ancora
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Noah è ancora all’aeroporto.
Marco: Noah is still at the airport.
Cinzia: The next word is invece
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Ho fame. Io invece ho sete.
Marco: I’m hungry. Instead, I’m thirsty.
Cinzia: The next word is campagna.
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Mi piace passeggiare in campagna.
Marco: I love walking in the countryside.
Cinzia: And the next word we’ll look at is mutuo
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Devono ancora finire di pagare il mutuo.
Marco: They still have to extinguish the mortgage.
Cinzia: Ayy mutuo, the common nightmare. And now, let’s take a look at today’s grammar.

Lesson focus

Cinzia: The Futuro Semplice tense works nearly as the English Simple Future.
Marco: Today we shall focus on the futuro semplice of the verbs essere, “to be”, and avere, “to have”.
Cinzia: we use this tense when we wish to convey occurrences meant to take place in the future
Marco: and we do not know whether they will take place or not.
Cinzia: here are some examples with the verb essere. Voi sarete i benvenuti a casa mia.
Marco: You will be welcome at my house.
Cinzia: Sarò lì fra cinque minuti.
Marco: I will be there in five minutes.
Cinzia: And here are some examples with the verb avere. Avrai tempo di aiutarmi?
Marco: Will you have time to help me out?
Cinzia: Quando avremo parchi decenti?
Marco: When will we have decent parks?
Cinzia: Ah, that’s a good matter.
Marco: Yes, well in Italy you don’t have such beautiful parks, I think, as in for example, Britain.
Cinzia: Wales, Ireland.
Marco: Yes.
Cinzia: Well we have some parks, we have Sempione in Milan.
Marco: Yes, but it seems like they were trying to build a big big parking center somewhere there.
Cinzia: Yes, so let's protect our green spaces.
Marco: Yes, we should.
Cinzia: Now let us take a look at the conjugation of these two verbs
Marco: let us start with the futuro semplice of the verb essere, “to be”
Io sar-ò “I will be”
Tu sar-ai “You will be”
Lui/lei sar-à “He/she/it will be”
Noi sar-emo “We will be”
Voi sar-ete “You will be”
Loro sar-anno “They will be”
Marco: now the verb avere “to have”
Io avr-ò “I will have”
Tu avr-ai “You will have”
Lui/lei avr-à “He/she/it will have”
Noi avr-emo “We will have”
Voi avr-ete “You will have”
Loro avr-anno “They will have”
Cinzia: Before we end today's grammar, we have to remind our listeners about a very important but tiny tiny thing.
Marco: you mean piccola piccola?
Cinzia: hehe, yes.
note that the first plural person ending is written with only one “m”
Marco: this is done in order to distinguish it from the first plural person of present conditional
Cinzia: which is written with the double “m”.
Marco: This rule is valid to all three conjugations verbs, both regular and irregular.

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today.
Marco: Okay, some of our listeners already know about the most powerful tool on ItalianPod101.com.
Cinzia: line-by-line audio.
Marco: The perfect tool for rapidly improving listening comprehension...
Cinzia: by listening to lines of the conversation again and again.
Marco: Listen until every word and syllable becomes clear. Basically, we breakdown the dialog into comprehensible, bite-size sentences.
Cinzia: You can try the line-by-line audio in the Premium Learning Center at ItalianPod101.com.
Marco: Ciao a tutti!
Cinzia: Ciao!

18 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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E tu dove sarai? And where wil you be?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 10:33 AM
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Hi Mohit,


In Italian interrogative words (ex."quando", "dove") usually are not followed by the subject. Therefore the subject comes at the end of the sentence or at the beginning.

Here are some examples:

1-Quando parte il treno? / Il treno, quando parte? - "When does the train leave?"

2-Dove va il treno? / Il treno, dove va? - "Where does the train go?"


I hope this helps,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Mohit
Wednesday at 03:43 PM
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Can we write this sentence (Chissà quando parte Luca.) as Chissà quando Luca parte?If not, then why ?

Mohit
Wednesday at 03:23 PM
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Can we write this sentence (Chissà quando parte Luca.) as Chissà quando Luca parts?If not, then why ?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 04:49 PM
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Hi Tom and Karen,


It's not always necessary to use the gerundio (ex. "passando") with "stare". You can also use it on itself, similarly to the -ing form verbs in English.

Ex. Studiando tanto, passerai l'esame. "By studying a lot, you'll pass the examination."


You can find something more in this lesson: https://www.italianpod101.com/2012/09/17/intermediate-12-be-careful-in-italian-traffic/


Grazie,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Tomaso
Thursday at 02:22 AM
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Ciao tutti,


Listening to the lesson, Marco said "passando" when thinking about the future. He did not use a helping verb. We learned you have to use it with stare. Is it ok to use it without stare? If so, under what conditions?


Grazie mille,


Tom and Karen

Ruggero
Monday at 03:46 PM
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Hello Katrina,

Yep, "invece" is used alot in italian, it never occured to me but you are actually right!


"Invece" can replace the English "instead", "on the other hand", "on the contrary", "whereas" and "but" in some cases.


The Italian language has the equivalent of these words, nevertheless "invece" seem to be a quick replacement so that is perhaps why it is used alot - maybe used more often in speaking more than writing.


However, I would suggest to use "invece" only when you wanted to use "instead" to be safe.


Cheers!

Katrina
Thursday at 07:50 AM
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I've noticed how often "invece" seems to be used in Italian. In the dialogue when John says "Tu invece avrai una casa in campagna", would it be common to insert the 'instead' in Italian? In this lesson I noticed it again in the vocabulary sentences, when it says "Ho fame. Io invece ho sete". I'm wondering if I should learn to use it more often in these sorts of cases? Of course it makes sense in English, it's just not commonly used in that way!

Consuelo
Thursday at 10:41 AM
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Ciao Ken,

no, gli italiani non dicono "my bad", noi magari diciamo "colpa mia" o "errore mio". :mrgreen:


Buona giornata,


Consuelo

Ken
Thursday at 04:23 AM
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Consuelo,

Di niente! Noi tutti facciamo gli sbagli, specialmente 'typos".

Gli italiani, dicono "my bad"? Dicono in italiano o inglese?

A presto,

Ken

Consuelo
Wednesday at 11:19 AM
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Ciao Ken,


I'm sorry, my bad, the correct one is "la scarpa è sull'altro piede" with the apostrophe, sorry for the typo :???:


Grazie mille per il tuo commento, sono molto contenta di esserti utile. :grin:


Buona giornata,


Consuelo