Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Cinzia: Buon giorno a tutti! Sono Cinzia.
Marco: Marco here. Newbie Series, season 1, lesson #33 - Do You Know the Italian Athlete Fausto Coppi? Buon giorno a tutti! My name is Marco. And I’m joined here by our lovely Cinzia. Come Stai?
Cinzia: Benissimo, grazie, Marco. Hello and welcome to the 33rd lesson of Newbie Series.
Marco: Here we take a broad approach to the language, emphasizing listening comprehension
Cinzia: speech, grammar
Marco: vocabulary and usage.
Cinzia: So join us for this lesson of Italianpod101.com.
Marco: Here we take a broad approach to the language, emphasizing listening comprehension
Cinzia: speech, grammar
Marco: vocabulary and usage.
Cinzia: So join us for this lesson of Italianpod101.com.
Marco: Before we jump in, remember to reinforce your Italian by using the Grammar Bank of the Learning Center at Italianpod101.com.
Cinzia: In today’s lesson, we will be studying the imperfetto tense again, but…
Marco: This time of the second conjugation verbs.
Cinzia: Yes. So the description regards both irregular and regular verbs.
Marco: In today’s dialogue, I will be John while Cinzia will be…
Cinzia: Laura.
Marco: And they will be talking about a very famous Italian cyclist.
Cinzia: Fausto Coppi.
Marco: Yes, let’s start the dialogue.
DIALOGUE
Laura: Conosci Fausto Coppi?
John: No, chi è?
Laura: Era il più grande ciclista italiano, correva molto veloce!
John: Davvero?
Laura: Si e non beveva mai prima delle gare.
Marco: Let’s hear it slowly now.
Laura: Conosci Fausto Coppi?
John: No, chi è?
Laura: Era il più grande ciclista italiano, correva molto veloce!
John: Davvero?
Laura: Si e non beveva mai prima delle gare.
Marco: And now, with the translation.
Laura: Conosci Fausto Coppi?
Marco: Do you know Fausto Coppi?
John: No, chi è?
Marco: No, who is he?
Laura: Era il più grande ciclista italiano, correva molto veloce!
Marco: He was the greatest Italian cyclist; he ran very fast!
John: Davvero?
Marco: Really?
Laura: Si e non beveva mai prima delle gare.
Marco: Yes, and he never drank before races.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: And there actually is a very, very famous story concerning Fausto Coppi’s habit of not drinking any alcohol before races.
Cinzia: That’s what any sportsperson should do.
Marco: Certainly, but the story goes like this. Bartelli, another famous cyclist and Coppi, they were both racing uphill on the Alps when Coppi gets very, very tired and has cramps in his legs. So Bartelli stops, goes back to him and says,
Cinzia: Coppi sei un acquaiolo! Ricordatelo! Solo un acquaiolo.
Marco: And what he meant to say is that people who don’t drink little bit of wine are worthless people and in that time, you said, acquaiolo, somebody who only drinks or sells water.
Cinzia: That’s a really nice story and actually I want to seize the chance and say that even if Bartelli and Coppi were, how can I say, enemies?
Marco: Well, competitors.
Cinzia: Yes. They used to…
Marco: Help each other.
Cinzia: Yes, exactly so…
Marco: They used to encourage one another, and in this case, Bartelli wanted to show him that he had to make more sacrifices because their family had made so many sacrifices to help him race and it was just after Second World War, I mean not even 10 years, 20 years after it. So Italy was still rather a poor country.
Cinzia: Yes. They are both very important characters of the Italian history.
Marco: They sure are, and so we’ve just seen in today’s dialogue, and in the explanation we’ve given you that we sometimes use the imperfetto to describe the personality or character of a person in the past.
Cinzia: Yes in fact in the dialogue, we found Laura’s line, era il più grande ciclista italiano, correva molto veloce!
Marco: “He was the greatest Italian cyclist. He ran very fast”. Now let’s take a look at today’s vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Today’s first word is
Cinzia: conoscere [natural native speed]
Marco: to know
Cinzia: conoscere [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: conoscere [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word is
Cinzia: ciclista [natural native speed]
Marco: cyclist
Cinzia: ciclista [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: ciclista [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word is
Cinzia: correre [natural native speed]
Marco: to run
Cinzia: correre [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: correre [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word is
Cinzia: veloce [natural native speed]
Marco: fast
Cinzia: veloce [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: veloce [natural native speed]
Marco: And the next word is
Cinzia: bere [natural native speed]
Marco: to drink
Cinzia: bere [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: bere [natural native speed]
Marco: And next word
Cinzia: prima [natural native speed]
Marco: before, earlier
Cinzia: prima [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: prima [natural native speed]
Marco: Today’s last word is
Cinzia: gara [natural native speed]
Marco: competition, contest, race
Cinzia: gara [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: gara [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Cinzia: And now let’s have a look at the usage for some of the words and expressions. The first word we will look at is conoscere.
Marco:And the first sample sentence is,
Cinzia: Conosci il mio amico Mario?
Marco: Do you know my friend Mario.
Cinzia: Next we have a noun ciclista.
Marco: And the sample sentence is,
Cinzia: Il ciclista si è rotto una gamba.
Marco: The cyclist broke his leg.
Cinzia: Next, we have a verb correre
Marco: And the sample sentence is
Cinzia: Ho corso per due ore.
Marco: I ran for 2 hours.
Cinzia: Next, we have an adjective, veloce.
Marco: And the sample sentence is,
Cinzia: La nuova Ferrari corre molto veloce.
Marco: The new Ferrari runs very fast.
Cinzia: Yes. Do you like Ferrari?
Marco: I do like Ferrari, but I don’t think I’d ever drive one. I will be too scared.
Cinzia: Really, why?
Marco: There is too much money around me.
Cinzia: So what? It’s a Ferrari.
Marco: It scares me.
Cinzia: Oh, come on.
Marco: Too much power in that car.
Cinzia: What about Lamborghini?
Marco: Well, I like Lamborghini’s design also.
Cinzia: What about Porsche?
Marco: Talk about Italian brands. I like Alfa Romeo.
Cinzia: Me too.
Marco: I like the police cars we have in Italy. The Alfa Romeo they have, they are wonderful.
Cinzia: But have you heard that the Italian police owns now two models of Lamborghini?
Marco: Oh yes, they use these Lamborghini for high speed pursuits on our Italian highways and also for ceremonial purposes.
Cinzia: Next we have a verb bere.
Marco: And the sample sentence is,
Cinzia: Beviamo un tè?
Marco: Shall we drink tea?
Cinzia: And the last word we will look at is gara.
Marco: And the last sample sentence is,
Cinzia: Hai vinto la gara?
Marco: Did you win the race?

Lesson focus

Marco: As we saw before, in today’s lesson, we use the imperfetto to describe the personality or character of a person in the past, but now we should see the…
Cinzia: Second conjugation verbs.
Marco: Perfect. And as with the first conjugation verbs, we just drop the stem for the infinitive and add the appropriate endings for the imperfetto.
Cinzia: What is the appropriate ending for the second conjugation?
Marco: It is -evo, -evi, -eva, -evamo, -evate, -evano.
Cinzia: Now let’s see it in the verb’s conjugation.
Marco: And today’s first verb is
Cinzia: spegnere
Marco: “to switch off"
Cinzia: Io spegn-evo
Marco: "I switched off"
Cinzia: Tu spegn-evi
Marco: "You switched off"
Cinzia: Lui/lei spegn-eva
Marco: "He/she/it switched off"
Cinzia: Noi spegn-evamo
Marco: "We switched off"
Cinzia: Voi spegn-evate
Marco: "You switched off"
Cinzia: Loro spegn-evano
Marco: "They switched off"
Cinzia: Next we have the verb correre
Marco: "to run"
Cinzia: Io corr-evo
Marco: "I ran"
Cinzia: Tu corr-evi
Marco: "You ran"
Cinzia: Lui/lei corr-eva
Marco: "He/she/it ran"
Cinzia: Noi corr-evamo
Marco: "We ran"
Cinzia: Voi corr-evate
Marco: "You ran"
Cinzia: Loro corr-evano
Marco: "They ran"
Cinzia: These verbs follow the regular conjugation.
Marco: As is with the majority of verbs in the imperfetto tense. Instead, now let’s take a look at the verb of the second conjugation that is actually irregular also in the imperfetto tense.
Cinzia: And it’s an exception. So let’s see its conjugation. It’s the verb bere.
Marco: "to drink"
Cinzia: Io bev-evo
Marco: "I drank"
Cinzia: Tu bev-evi
Marco: "You drank"
Cinzia: Lui/lei bev-eva
Marco: "He/she/it drank"
Cinzia: Noi bev-evamo
Marco: "We drank"
Cinzia: Voi bev-evate
Marco: "You drank"
Cinzia: Loro bev-evano
Marco: "They drank". And just as we saw with the verb fare in the last lesson of the newbie series, also bere follows, just as fare, its Latin root, in this case bev. And after bev we just attach the normal infinitive tense endings for the second conjugation. That’s it.

Outro

Cinzia: After this very, very easy lesson, I think that’s all and see you next time.
Marco: Yes! Ciao ciao, a presto.
Cinzia: Ciao, a presto!

16 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Have you ever heard of Fausto Coppi?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 12:34 PM
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Hi Mohit,


Usually "prima" is followed by the preposition "di", that's why we have "prima delle gare."

delle = di + le


I hope this helps!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Mohit
Friday at 05:18 PM
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Ciao

Si e non beveva mai prima delle gare

In this sentence what's the use of ' delle ' preposition ?


Grazie.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:56 PM
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Hi Harry,

I guess so!!! ahahah unfortunately I simply need to improve my English :lol:

a presto

Chiara

Team ItalianPod101.com

Harry
Sunday at 07:00 AM
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Caro Chiara


I noticed that you said 'context plays always' rather than 'contaxt always plays'. Are you mimicking the Italian order in English to help us. ;)

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 12:37 AM
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Hi,

it is always difficult to define exactly the difference between passato prossimo and imperfetto and often both verbs can be used in the same sentence. Context plays always an important role and the usage of one tense or the other sometimes creates only a small difference in meaning, while both solutions can be grammatically correct. Having said that, a general rule is to use imperfetto to describe places, situations or people in the past like, Fausto Coppi era il piu' grande ciclista italiano. or Mia nonna aveva gli occhi azzurri, My grandmother had blue eyes.

It is not possible to use imperfetto in the sentence about Napoleone because the time limit is specified. it says 'di sempre',' of all times'. here you must use passato prossimo, even if it is a description because there is a time specification. So also the sentence: Fausto Coppi è stato il più grande ciclista italiano degli ultimi 50 anni' requires the passato prossimo because the time frame is clear 'in the last 50 years.'

Hope it is better now.

Have fun learning Italian :)


Chiara


Team ItalianPod101.com

Ken
Monday at 09:21 PM
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Consuelo,

Sì, sì ed i fratelli Molinari!

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 11:19 AM
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Ciao Ken,


that is the right spellig for "acquaiolo". Anyway that meant "teetotaler" before, or a person who sold water, but now it is not used anymore (Bartali uses it as a joke). When referring to someone who does not drink alcohol we say "astemio".


About Italian golfers, are you talking about Matteo Manassero? :grin:


Ciao a presto,


Consuelo

Ken
Wednesday at 06:36 AM
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Marco o Cinzia,

Very enjoyable lesson with a nice blend of Italian and English within the lesson. Come si scrive "acquaiolo"? Is the term still used? Is the term in any way similar to "teetotaler"?

How about the Italian golfers who have come onto the world stage this year? Forza Italia!

Hyonu
Wednesday at 08:09 PM
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Si! Grazie della risposta, Marco! :mrgreen:

Marco
Tuesday at 02:19 PM
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You can say.

Grazie della risposta, Marco!