Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Marco: Buon giorno! Mi chiamo Marco. Marco here! Newbie Series, Season 1, lesson #25 - Do You Have Enough Dough for Your Italian Life?
Cinzia: Buon giorno a tutti! My name is Cinzia, and I’m joined here by Marco.
Marco: Benvenuti!
Cinzia: We will be guiding you through basic grammar and vocabulary…
Marco: And don’t forget that we’re going to discuss different aspects of the language, culture and customs that you’ll find in Italy.
Marco: The focus of this lesson is the passato prossimo tense.
Cinzia: This conversation takes place in Laura’s apartment.
Marco: And it is between John and Laura.
Cinzia: They are friends, therefore they will be speaking informal Italian. So let’s see the dialogue.
Marco: Before we jump in let's remind our students to stop by the learning center to check for additional resources for the learning experience.
DIALOGUE
John: Sei andata a fare la spesa?
Laura: Sì, ma non ho trovato le tue focacce.
John: Che peccato!
Marco: Let’s hear it slowly now.
John: Sei andata a fare la spesa?
Laura: Sì, ma non ho trovato le tue focacce.
John: Che peccato!
Marco: And now, with the translation.
John: Sei andata a fare la spesa?
John: Did you go get groceries?
Laura: Sì, ma non ho trovato le tue focacce.
Laura: Yes, though I didn't find your focaccia.
John: Che peccato!
John: What a pity!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Cinzia: Oh, Marco, it's a very short dialog!
Marco: Yes! Che peccato! What a pity!
Cinzia: Yes but we have some important topics in it!
Marco: Yes, in the first line, we see sei andata; and in the second line, we see...
Cinzia: Non hai trovato.
Marco: Passato prossimo.
Cinzia: Simple past.
Marco: Exactly.
Cinzia: So let's move on the vocabulary and then let's see in details the grammar.
VOCAB LIST
Marco: First word is
Cinzia: andare [natural native speed]
Marco: to go
Cinzia: andare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: andare [natural native speed]
Marco: Next, we have an expression
Cinzia: fare la spesa [natural native speed]
Marco: to get groceries
Cinzia: fare la spesa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: fare la spesa [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: ma [natural native speed]
Marco: but
Cinzia: ma [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: ma [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: tuo [natural native speed]
Marco: your, yours
Cinzia: tuo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: tuo [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: focaccia [natural native speed]
Marco: focaccia (a type of flat bread)
Cinzia: focaccia [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: focaccia [natural native speed]
Marco: And finally, we have an expression
Cinzia: che peccato! [natural native speed]
Marco: What a pity!
Cinzia: che peccato! [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: che peccato! [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Cinzia: And now let’s have a look at the usage for some of the words and expressions. First, we have an expression, which is fare la spesa.
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Non ho fatto la spesa.
Marco: I didn’t get groceries.
Cinzia: Oh Marco, Marco, listen. Do you often go a fare la spesa? Or do you often go a fare spese?
Marco: There's a difference there, isn't there?
Cinzia: Yes my dear!
Marco: So fare la spesa means “to go get groceries”... right?
Cinzia: Yes, so it means that you go a supermarket!
Marco: So that will be what I do... instead what you do is...
Cinzia: Fare spese... “Go shopping”!
Marco: Yes exactly, fare spese means to go out and buy many things, it's a really small difference but as in English, one is food stuff... fare la spesa, and the other can be anything else except usually food stuff.
Cinzia: Bravo Marco! Please don't get confuse between fare spese and fare la spesa... because one actually is plural fare spese "go shopping"... and the other one is singular fare la spesa.
Marco: "Go get groceries"
Cinzia: So let's move to the next word.
Marco: Which is, Cinzia?
Cinzia: Ma.
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Strano ma vero.
Marco: It's strange but true... So I can hear the music of x-files coming... Uhhhh!
Cinzia: Oh, so scary...
Cinzia: The next word we will look at is tuo.
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Il merito è tuo.
Marco: The credit is yours.
Cinzia: Uh, I don't agree... but let's take a look at the next word, which is… focaccia.
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Ho mangiato due focacce.
Marco: I ate two focacce.
Marco: You're eating a lot, Cinzia?
Cinzia: Ah yes, overall in this period.
Marco: Ok let's move on to the last example.
Cinzia: Yes, which is che peccato!
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Che peccato!
Marco: So it's the same as the expression, and it means “what a pity”.
Cinzia: Or “what a shame”!
Marco: Exactly, so for example let's say there's a soccer match and my team loses, I can say Che peccato, right?
Cinzia: Si! Che peccato!
Marco: But usually we say very bad expressions when our team loses, right?
Cinzia: Ahhh! Don't even mention it Marco!
Marco: Ok let's move on to the grammar!

Lesson focus

Marco: As we have started seeing in the last lesson, in today's grammar point we're gonna take a look at the passato prossimo of the first conjugation.
Cinzia: Which is the simple past, and in Italian is conveyed by...
Marco: ... by using the present form of the auxiliary verb, conjugated according to the subject they refer to, then followed by the past participle of the main verb.
Cinzia: Bravissimo Marco!
Marco: Thank you, thank you.
Cinzia: So let’s see some examples.
Marco: But before we do that, let's take a look at when we're gonna use the auxiliary essere and when we're gonna use the auxiliary avere.
Cinzia: Right.
Marco: So, we have maybe four main cases when we have to use the auxiliary essere, right?
Cinzia: Yes.
Marco: So what is the first case?
Cinzia: The first case regards verbs that express physical movement from or to a specific point.
Marco: For example…
Cinzia: arrivare
Marco: “to arrive”
Cinzia: tornare
Marco: “to come back”
Cinzia: partire
Marco: “to leave”. And what about the second case?
Cinzia: The second case regards reflexive and pronominal verbs.
Marco: For example…
Cinzia: svegliarsi
Marco: “to wake up”. And the third case?
Cinzia: Verbs like nascere
Marco: “to be born”
Cinzia: morire
Marco: “to die”
Cinzia: vivere
Marco: “to live”
Cinzia: And, diventare
Marco: “to become”
Cinzia: The last case is with verbs like piacere
Marco: “to like”
Cinzia: sembrare
Marco: “to seem”
Cinzia: succedere
Marco: “to happen, to take place”. While with all the other verbs, we use the auxiliary avere.
Cinzia: And now, let’s take a look at few conjugations.
Marco: Yes, and the first we’ll take a look at, is the verb “to go”, that requires the auxiliary essere
Cinzia: Io sono andato
Marco: I have gone/went
Cinzia: Tu sei andato
Marco: You have gone/went
Cinzia: Lui è andato
Marco: He has gone/went
Cinzia: Lei è andata
Marco: She has gone/went
Cinzia: Noi siamo andati
Marco: We have gone/went
Cinzia: Voi siete andati
Marco: You have gone/went
Cinzia: Loro sono andati
Marco: They have gone/went
Cinzia: So it’s pretty easy to remember, Marco.
Marco:Yes, we only had one difference here. We had the distinguish between “he has gone/went”, and “she has gone/went”, right?
Cinzia: Oh, yes, because in “she”, the past participle has to match with the gender.
Marco: Only in the case of the auxiliary essere.
Cinzia: Yes, of course. In fact, we have lei è andata.
Marco: Exactly, instead we have lui è andato.
Cinzia: The past participle just behaves as an adjective.
Marco: with the auxiliary essere
Cinzia: Yes. And now let’s take a look at the verb trovare
Marco: “to find”.
Cinzia: Which requires the auxiliary verb avere.
Cinzia: Io ho trovato
Marco: I have found/found
Cinzia: Tu hai trovato
Marco: You have found/found
Cinzia: Lui/Lei ha trovato
Marco: He/She/It has found/found
Cinzia: Noi abbiamo trovato
Marco: We have found/found
Cinzia: Voi avete trovato
Marco: You have found/found
Cinzia: Loro hanno trovato
Marco: They have found/found
Marco: And as we have noticed, in this case, nothing change. Because with the auxiliary avere, the past participle is always the same.

Outro

Cinzia: Yes, Marco. Thank you very much.
Marco: Thank you for today! Grazie per oggi
Cinzia: E grazie a voi ascoltatori, ricordatevi di commentare. Ciao ciao, alla prossima.
Marco: Ciao!

19 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Mi piace molto andare a fare le spese !.. ma non mi piace tanto andare a fare la spesa... :???: I know an italian-style ice-cream parlor where they sell ice-cream inside a bread they call focaccina... I've never tried it, I'm a bit wary of ice cream in bread. Is it a real italian delicacy ? And should I try ?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 10:15 AM
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Hi everyone,


Thank you for posting.


@Ken, we'll consider your suggestion, thank you very much!


@royalahzab, please check this lesson: Self Introduction


Saluti,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

royalahzab
Friday at 08:06 AM
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sking how about you want to introduce your self to a friend or partner

Ken
Saturday at 05:50 AM
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Ofelia,

Thank you for your excellent explanation and for correcting my errors. It is clearer, but difficult. Just something else to memorize and practice. A proposito, perhaps the team could come up with a SERIES OF PRACTICE EXERCISES for situations like this and other grammar problems.

Thanks again.

Ken

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 12:03 AM
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Ciao Ken,


Your question is very good!

"Hai trovato le mie chiavi? No, non le ho trovate."

In the second sentence the past participle has to change in "trovate" because the verb is proceeded by "LE". The same thing is valid for the other pronomi oggetto "LO", "LI", "LE".

For example: "Li ho visti al bar", "I saw them in the coffee shop".

I hope it is clearer now.

Thank you very much! Grazie mille!


Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Ken
Tuesday at 04:21 AM
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Una domanda: Se ho il dialogo: Hai trovato le mie chiavi? No, non li ho trovato, ma penso che Marco li ha trovato. E' giusto di usare "trovato" e non "trovati" o c'è un ragione possibile per usare "trovati"? Nel la lezione, Marco dice che si usa sempre il "trovato" se il verbo ausiliario è "avere." Vero?

A question: If I have the dialogue: Have you found my keys? No, I have not found them, but I think that Marco has found them. Is it correct to use "trovato" and not "trovati" or is there a possible reason to use "trovati"? In the lesson Marco says to use "trovato" if the auxiliary verb is "to have." True? Any exceptions?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 08:43 AM
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Ciao Wesam,


We're very glad to hear that!


Please let us know any other comments or questions you might have!

Have fun learning Italian with us! And stay tuned that every week we have new lessons for you!


Paloma

Team ItalianPod101

Wesam
Thursday at 04:33 AM
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Ciao Paloma,


Grazie Mille for your quick response :grin:


The new Lesson Notes layout is wonderful. It's arranged beautifully and it's very clear to read and study from.


Thank you very much for the great work :grin:

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 03:15 PM
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Ciao Wesam,


I apologize for all the trouble. We recently updated our Lesson Notes system, so we're finishing up the changes.

I appreciate your patience. Please don't hesitate to contact us for any questions or comments you might have.

Do you like the new Lesson Notes layout?


Cheers,

Paloma

Team ItalianPod101

Wesam
Tuesday at 05:02 AM
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Thank you very much for fixing the notes. :grin:

Wesam
Friday at 05:11 PM
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Grazie Paloma. Sei molto gentile :smile:


The missing parts are also in the beginning lessons like (2 - 10 - 11 - 12 - 13 - 14 - 15 - 16 - 18 - 19). In lesson 17 There are missing tables for the verbs cercare and pagare and the cultural insight is not complete compared to the old version of the lesson's notes.


I reached lesson 32 with the old notes but unfortunately I had to stop studying until the problems are fixed in the new version. :sad:


I hope you fix them soon.