Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Cinzia: Buon giorno a tutti! Mi chiamo Cinzia.
Marco: Marco here.Newbie Series season 1, lesson #22 - How Many Ways Can You Say 'I'm Sorry'? Buon giorno a tutti! My name is Marco and I'm joined here by Cinzia! Come stai Cinzia!
Cinzia: Bene grazie, e tu?
Marco: Molto bene.
Cinzia: Hello everyone and welcome to the 22nd lesson of the Newbie Series!
Marco: Here we take a broad approach to the language, emphasizing listening comprehension...
Cinzia: speech and grammar...
Marco: vocabulary and usage.
Cinzia: So join us for this lesson of Italianpod101.com.
Marco: In this lesson we will continue to take a look at frequency adverbs,
Cinzia: This conversation takes place at Laura and Martina's apartment.
Marco: And it is between John and Martina.
Cinzia: They are friends, so they will be speaking informal Italian.
Marco: Be sure to check out the vocabulary list in the pdf for this lesson!
DIALOGUE
John: Ciao Martina, c'è Laura?
Martina: No, mi dispiace non c'è.
John: Sai dov'è?
Martina: Ogni tanto va al parco a fare jogging, forse è là.
John: Jogging? Ah... Io non faccio mai jogging.
Marco: Let’s hear it slowly now.
John: Ciao Martina, c'è Laura?
Martina: No, mi dispiace non c'è.
John: Sai dov'è?
Martina: Ogni tanto va al parco a fare jogging, forse è là.
John: Jogging? Ah... Io non faccio mai jogging.
Marco: And now, with the translation.
John: Ciao Martina, c'è Laura?
Marco: Hi Martina, is Laura there?
Martina: No, mi dispiace non c'è.
Marco: No, sorry, she's not here.
John: Sai dov'è?
Marco: Do you know where she is?
Martina: Ogni tanto va al parco a fare jogging, forse è là.
Marco: Sometimes she goes jogging at the park; maybe she's there.
John: Jogging? Ah... Io non faccio mai jogging.
Marco: Jogging? Ah...I never go jogging.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: Cinzia, what about jogging in Italy? Is jogging, let's say, a popular sport in Italy?
Cinzia: Oh yes! Many people love jogging in Italy!
Marco: So where do you usually find people jogging in Italy?
Cinzia: Where? In many parks for example, on the seaside...
Marco: Yes, I used to go jogging on the seaside in Sanremo!
Cinzia: Oh really? How was it?
Marco: It was fun! Even though sometimes, especially during summer, so many people are going to the sea, that it's actually difficult to do jogging there, too many cars.
Cinzia: Yes, you're right Marco, but maybe that's why you should go jogging very early in the morning.
Marco: Early in the morning?
Cinzia: Yes, like five or six, no people bothering you...
Marco: Very good idea, so if any of our listeners comes to Italy, they want to go jogging, they should go in the early morning right?
Cinzia: Yes, so wake up early if you gonna go jogging.
Marco: Or also, let's say, just before supper, you can find many people jogging near the seaside or in parks, right?
Cinzia: Yes! And also you can find many people taking their dogs for a walk.
Marco: Yes, true, so be careful.
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Ok then, let’s go on with the vocabulary.
Marco: First word
Cinzia: c'è [natural native speed]
Marco: there is
Cinzia: c'è [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: c'è [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: mi dispiace [natural native speed]
Marco: I am sorry, sorry
Cinzia: mi dispiace [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: mi dispiace [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: sapere [natural native speed]
Marco: to know
Cinzia: sapere [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: sapere [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: ogni tanto [natural native speed]
Marco: sometimes
Cinzia: ogni tanto [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: ogni tanto [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: parco [natural native speed]
Marco: park
Cinzia: parco [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: parco [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: fare jogging [natural native speed]
Marco: to go jogging
Cinzia: fare jogging [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: fare jogging [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: forse [natural native speed]
Marco: maybe
Cinzia: forse [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: forse [natural native speed]
Marco: And last word
Cinzia: mai [natural native speed]
Marco: never
Cinzia: mai [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: mai [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Cinzia: And now let’s have a look at the usage for some of the words and expressions. The first word we will look at is mi dispiace.
Marco: And the first example is?
Cinzia: Mi dispiace, ho fatto tardi.
Marco: Sorry, I'm late. So very useful expression, right?
Cinzia: Oh yes, and actually often used also!
Marco: Yes because in Italy what happens is that traffic usually gets in the way of your appointment, right?
Cinzia: Yes!
Marco: Or trains strikes!
Cinzia: Right, Marco. Actually in Italy sometimes it doesn't depend on you, because even if you're on time, you can be late.
Marco: We don't manage time, sorry about that. Time manages us.
Cinzia: Yes, but it's true. So learn how to say
Marco: That is
Cinzia: sapere
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Sai dove andare?
Marco: Do you know where to go?
Cinzia: ogni tanto
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Ogni tanto mangio la verdura.
Marco: Sometimes I eat vegetables.
Cinzia: Which is actually true.
Marco: Yes, I guess it's common with any country, but young people, well that's if we are still young Cinzia, you are... am I?
Cinzia: Of course I am, I don't know about you, but I am!
Marco: Ok, well anyway also in Italy young people don't really like to eat that much vegetable.
Cinzia: Actually I don't really like all the kinds of vegetables.
Marco: But really, if you come to Italy, try our Italian vegetables and especially fruit.
Cinzia: parco
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Parco Sempione è a Milano.
Marco: Sempione Park is in Milan.
Cinzia: Have you ever been there Marco?
Marco: Never, but it's actually big isn't it?
Cinzia: Yes it's big and it's very very nice, you can go jogging there, you can cycle, you can take your dog for a walk.
Cinzia: forse
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Forse domani vado al mare.
Marco: Maybe tomorrow I will go to the beach.
Cinzia: Yes, if the weather is fine.
Marco: And dear listeners, please notice that mare means...
Cinzia: Sea...
Marco: But beach in Italian would be spiaggia, so we Italians like to say
Cinzia: vado al mare
Marco: meaning go to the beach.
Cinzia: Yes. We don't really say vado a spiaggia.
Marco: We do, but it's more common maybe to say, vado al mare.
Cinzia: Yes, andare al mare has a general meaning.
Marco: It means to go the sea, but in English it’s more “let's go to the beach”. Maybe because we swim more? I mean we're a peninsula, so maybe it comes from our tradition of sailors.
Cinzia: Yes, maybe it's true, Marco, I love swimming and actually I prefer swimming rather than sunbathing.
Marco: Do you know any Italian friend who doesn't know how to swim?
Cinzia: No...
Marco: I don't either. Really, so maybe it's also one of the reasons.
Cinzia: Ok, let's move on, and the last word we will look at is mai.
Marco: And the last example sentence is?
Cinzia: Mai dire mai.
Marco: “Never say never”. So very simple phrase but really catchy, right?
Cinzia: Yes.
Marco: So one more time.
Cinzia: Mai dire mai.
Marco: “Never say never”.

Lesson focus

Marco: In the previous lesson, we saw something called frequency adverbs, right?
Cinzia: Oh, yes! Avverbi di frequenza.
Marco: We saw some also today, right?
Cinzia: We saw ogni tanto.
Marco: That means “sometimes”. Then?
Cinzia: We also saw mai.
Marco: “Never”.
Cinzia: We didn’t see di solito, did we?
Marco: No, but di solito means “usually”.
Cinzia: Yes.
Marco: So remember, just as we’ve said in the last lesson, frequency adverbs convey the frequency of an action in relative terms, that means NOT absolute time measure, such as...
Cinzia: “twice a week”?
Marco: Exactly. Now let’s take a look at the usage of ogni tanto.
Cinzia: Which is normally positioned before the verb in simple tenses.
Marco: For example...
Cinzia: ogni tanto vado in palestra.
Marco: “I sometimes go to the gym”.
Cinzia: And in the compound ones it's normally positioned at the beginning or at the end of the phrase.
Marco: For example, sono andato a ballare ogni tanto, or ogni tanto sono andato a ballare.
Cinzia: “Sometimes I went dancing”.
Marco: So we can have, in this case, ogni tanto at the beginning, or at the end.
Cinzia: Right. But please remember that ogni tanto cannot be broken up.
Marco: Exactly, they’re two separate words, but they have to be kept together.
Cinzia: Yes. And now, Marco, would you like to tell us about mai?
Marco: First of all, mai means “never”. And it’s nearly always matched with non. I mean nearly always, because you might find it in a short answer, just as mai, meaning “never”.
Cinzia: But usually the English "never" is translated in Italian with non and then mai, so non is positioned before the verb in simple tenses, and mai right after it.
Marco: For example, non guardo mai la TV.
Cinzia: “I never watch TV.”
Marco: Instead, in compound tenses, non is before the auxiliary verb and mai is between the auxiliary and the past participle of the main verb. For example…
Cinzia: Non ho mai visto questo film.
Marco: "I've never seen this movie."
Cinzia: Right, and then, what else we have?
Maco: We also have di solito, that means "usually".
Cinzia: Yes, but that is very easy, isn’t it?
Marco: Yes, yes, very easy.
Cinzia: So, give us an example, Marco.
Marco: La mattina di solito esco alle otto.
Cinzia: "In the morning I usually go out at 8".
Marco: Very simple. So between ogni tanto, mai, and di solito, the most difficult is mai, because it is connected to non, but non is actually separate from mai.

Outro

Cinzia: That just about does it for today's lesson.
Marco: Make sure you check out the Grammar Point in this lesson's PDF, which you can pick up at Italianpod101.com.
Cinzia: There's a wealth of student resources there, just waiting for you.
Marco: Have a nice day!
Cinzia: Buona giornata a tutti! Ciao!

25 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Commentate per favore!

ItalianPod101.com
Thursday at 01:04 AM
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Ciao Melanee,


thanks for your comment!


Cheers,

Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

Melanee
Friday at 12:26 AM
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This was very good.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 08:50 AM
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Hi Chris,


Sometimes we can't directly translate English into Italian, since Italian would sound unnatural.

You can translate "to go jogging" as "fare jogging" or "andare a fare jogging".

"Andare a" + inifinitive is the basic phrase meaning "to go..." , for example: "andare a giocare" means "to go play".


I hope this helps!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Chris
Monday at 03:12 AM
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Could you explain why the sentence is, "non faccio mai jogging", using the verb fare instead of andare to say, "I go"? I think if I was trying to say "I never go jogging", I'd have said "non vado mai jogging". When I practice speaking, I use Italian when speaking with my toddler, and he always wants "to go" somewhere, so I want to be sure I'm using the verbs correctly!

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:31 AM
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Hi everyone,


Thank you for posting!


@Inji, prego! : )


@Patricia, as for your question: I'm afraid there isn't any lesson that could teach you that. In Italian, the gender of the third person subject is not clear unless the name of the person or the pronoun is expressed. Usually, you can get hints from the context. If it's a sentence out of context, the English translation can be either "he" or "she."

I hope this helps!


Grazie e a presto,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Patricia
Tuesday at 12:54 PM
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Ogni tanto va al parco a fare jogging, forse è là.

"Sometimes she goes jogging at the park; maybe she's there.

- I don’t understand how you would know in the above sentence that you would be referring to a “she”. I have a lot of trouble determining if the sentence is implying she or he. Any suggestions what lesson would help me learn this.

Grazie Mille

Patricia
Tuesday at 12:39 PM
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Che un davvero grande lezione!

- What a really great lesson. ( I got a lot out of this one. )

Grazie.

Inji
Wednesday at 10:58 PM
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Capisco adesso:smile:

Grazie mille Ofelia!

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 08:46 AM
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Ciao Inji,


Thank you for posting.

"Tardi" is an adverb and it never changes.

Be careful because "tardo", as adjective, if used for a person has a negative meaning, so don't use it! :thumbsup:


Grazie,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Inji
Monday at 08:08 PM
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Ciao!

Excuse me! Why have you said "ho fatto tardi" not "ho fatto tardo" as it's here supposed to be singular referring to "me"?


Grazie!