Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Cinzia: Buon giorno a tutti! Mi chiamo Cinzia.
Marco: Marco here. Newbie Series season 1, lesson 20 - The Rhythm of Italy. Buon giorno a tutti! I’m Marco and we’d like to welcome you to the 20th lesson of the Newbie Series in Italianpod101.com
Cinzia: Benvenuti!
Marco: We will be guiding you through basic grammar and vocabulary…
Cinzia: And don’t forget that we’re going to discuss different aspects of the language, culture and customs that you’ll find in Italy.
Marco: Excellent, excellent. So Cinzia, come stai oggi? How are you today?
Cinzia: Io sto molto bene oggi, grazie Marco, I am really fine today, thank you.
Marco: In this lesson we will review the three conjugations of the presente indicativo.
Cinzia: This conversation takes place in a bar.
Marco: And it is between Laura and John.
Cinzia: They are friends, therefore they will be speaking informal Italian.
DIALOGUE
John: Che musica ascolti?
Laura: Io amo la musica classica.
John: Davvero? Andiamo ad un concerto?
Laura: Certamente! Suggerisco di andare subito.
John: Ok, prendo la giacca e partiamo.
Marco: Let’s hear it slowly now.
John: Che musica ascolti?
Laura: Io amo la musica classica.
John: Davvero? Andiamo ad un concerto?
Laura: Certamente! Suggerisco di andare subito.
John: Ok, prendo la giacca e partiamo.
Marco: And now, with the translation.
John: Che musica ascolti?
Marco: What music do you listen to?
Laura: Io amo la musica classica.
Marco: I love classical music.
John: Davvero? Andiamo ad un concerto?
Marco: Really? Shall we go to a concert?
Laura: Certamente! Suggerisco di andare subito.
Marco: Sure! I suggest going right away.
John: Ok, prendo la giacca e partiamo.
Marco: Okay, I'll get my jacket and then we'll leave!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: Now, Laura and John are really gonna have a nice evening, aren't they?
Cinzia: Yes Marco, because they are in Firenze, and they are going maybe to Santa Maria Novella! It's a lovely square!
Marco: Yes, and in Italy, dear listeners, many cities offer open air concerts, not always classical music concerts, but also contemporary music concerts. And what else Cinzia?
Cinzia: We have cinema e teatro all'aperto!
Marco: Cinema is cinema or...
Cinzia: Movies...
Marco: And teatro is...
Cinzia: Theatre...
Marco: And all'aperto means?
Cinzia: In the open, or outdoor.
Marco: So you're watching a movie under the stars, right?
Cinzia: This is so romantic...
Marco: Yes, except when it rains.
Cinzia: Yes, and except for mosquitos.
Marco: How do we say mosquito in Italian?
Cinzia: Zanzara.
Marco: And listen to the sound... ZANZARA!
Cinzia: ZZZZZzzz...
Marco: Exactly, it just sounds like that doesn't it? Zanzara!
Cinzia: Anyway Marco, I think we should move on!
Marco: Ok then, sorry about that.
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let's take a look at today’s vocabulary.
Marco: First word
Cinzia: ascoltare [natural native speed]
Marco: to listen
Cinzia: ascoltare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: ascoltare [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: amare [natural native speed]
Marco: to love
Cinzia: amare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: amare [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: musica [natural native speed]
Marco: music
Cinzia: musica [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: musica [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: classica [natural native speed]
Marco: classic (feminine singular)
Cinzia: classica [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: classica [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: davvero [natural native speed]
Marco: really, truly, indeed
Cinzia: davvero [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: davvero [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: andare [natural native speed]
Marco: to go
Cinzia: andare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: andare [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: concerto [natural native speed]
Marco: concert
Cinzia: concerto [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: concerto [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: certamente [natural native speed]
Marco: certainly
Cinzia: certamente [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: certamente [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: suggerire [natural native speed]
Marco: to suggest
Cinzia: suggerire [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: suggerire [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: subito [natural native speed]
Marco: now, immediately
Cinzia: subito [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: subito [natural native speed]
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: prendere [natural native speed]
Marco: to take, get (figuratively, to buy)
Cinzia: prendere [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: prendere [natural native speed]
Marco: Last word
Cinzia: giacca [natural native speed]
Marco: jacket
Cinzia: giacca [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: giacca [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Cinzia: So now let’s have a look at the usage for some of the words and expressions.
Marco: The first word is, Cinzia?
Cinzia: amare
Marco: To love.
Cinzia: Mmmm.
Marco: Can you give us an example sentence please?
Cinzia: I gatti amano dormire.
Marco: Cats love sleeping.
Cinzia: musica
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Ascolto la musica Rock.
Marco: I listen to Rock music.
Cinzia: concerto
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Concerto all'aperto.
Marco: Open-air concert.
Cinzia: certamente
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Certamente signore!
Marco: Certainly, Sir! What about if it’s a woman?
Cinzia: Certamente signora!
Marco: Certainly, Madam! And what if it’s just “certainly”?
Cinzia: Certamente.
Marco: Ah, that’s easy, right?
Cinzia: Yes.
Marco: Ok then.
Cinzia: And the next word is subito.
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Torno subito.
Marco: I'll be right back. Rather often during lunch time, you can read Torno subito just on the door of shops, right?
Cinzia: Yes, and you know what, Marco?
Marco: What, what?
Cinzia: In Napoli, in my bit of Naples, people sometimes put this notice in their cars just for a very short time they park, just to let the others know that they’ll be right back.
Marco: So when they’re parking in no parking zones, they want to maybe say I’m going to the bakery, panetteria, and then I’ll be back?
Cinzia: Yes, exactly. So just to avoid the parking tickets.
Marco: Well, that’s a nice way. It’s actually really funny. Now come on, let’s finish these examples.
Cinzia: And the last word we will look at is giacca.
Marco: And the last sample sentence is?
Cinzia: È una giacca di pelle.
Marco: It's a leather jacket.

Lesson focus

Marco: Now, we’ll see more details on when we can use the presente indicativo tense. Cinzia, when can we use it?
Cinzia: Well, first of all, to express habitual actions that take place on a regular basis.
Marco: For example?
Cinzia: Vado in palestra tutti i giorni.
Marco: I go to the gym every day. So it’s habitual.
Cinzia: Yes.
Marco: Perfect. What else?
Cinzia: To express an ongoing action.
Marco: For example?
Cinzia: John legge un libro.
Marco: John is reading a book. The action is continuing.
Cinzia: Yes, but be careful, because as you can hear, in English, you use the present continuous, instead in Italian we use the present!
Marco: And in what other circumstances do we use the presente indicativo tense?
Cinzia: To express an action that will happen in the immediate future.
Marco: Ok, so one example for our listeners.
Cinzia: Paola torna alle sei.
Marco: Paola will be back at six o’clock. What else, Cinzia?
Cinzia: To express a permanent state or a recurring action.
Marco: Ok, a permanent state or a recurring action. One example should help them out!
Cinzia: Elisa vive a Firenze.
Marco: Elisa lives in Florence. Well yes, if she’s living there, it’s not just for one day, is it?
Cinzia: Yes, it’s permanent.
Marco: Or recurring, we don’t want her to stay all her life in Firenze. She can go to Napoli too!
Cinzia: Yes, well, why not?
Marco: What else then?
Cinzia: To express how long the subject has been performing an action.
Marco: Ok. So for example Leggo da tre ore. Is that ok?
Cinzia: To translate, I have been reading for three hours.
Marco: And furthermore, there is an additional circumstance where you can use the presente indicativo. Since it’s not so common, but it’s actually interesting, so please check the PDF.
Cinzia: Let's recap all the three conjugations, just in one time!
Marco: Yes, so open up your ears! First of all, we have…
Cinzia: First conjugation, -are verb, amare.
Io am-o “I love”
Tu am-i “You love”
Lui/lei am-a “He/she loves”
Noi am-iamo “We love”
Voi am-ate “You love”
Loro am-ano “They love”
Cinzia: And now, second conjugation: -ere verb, prendere.
Io prend-o “I take”
Tu prend-i “You take”
Lui/lei prend-e “He/she takes”
Noi prend-iamo “We take”
Voi prend-ete “You take”
Loro prend-ono “They take”
Cinzia: And third conjugation: -ire verb, partire.
Io part-o ”I leave”
Tu part-i “You leave”
Lui/lei part-e “He/she leaves”
Noi part-iamo “We leave”
Voi part-ite “You leave”
Loro part-ono “They leave”
Cinzia: And finally, let’s take a look at another verb of the third conjugation, -ir, suggerire.
Io sugger-isc-o “I suggest”
Tu sugger-isc-i “You suggest”
Lui/lei sugger-isc-e “He/she suggests”
Noi sugger-iamo “We suggest”
Voi sugger-ite “You suggest”
Loro sugger-isc-ono “They suggest”
Marco: Now dear listeners, sorry for this long grammar lesson, but if you can remember all we said in these last four lessons on the presente indicativo, you will have no more problems with the regular verbs. With the irregular ones... well... that's another lesson!

Outro

Cinzia: Buona fortuna! This is the end of today’s lesson.
Marco: Yes, but if you have any more doubts on verbs, please check the verb conjugation charts.
Cinzia: Yes. Buono studio!
Marco: That means “study well”.
Cinzia: Ciao ciao!
Marco: Ciao!

37 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Do you have any questions regarding the "presente indicativo"?

ItalianPod101.com
Tuesday at 10:24 PM
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@Jack (part 2)


So, as you can see, you can choose to use either the Present indicative or the Present progressive to talk about something happening now. They're interchangeable. But when talking about habitual actions or statements that are always valid, you can ONLY use the present indicative

"John legge" can mean (depending on the context) it's something he likes doing, he's not necessarily reading right now OR it's something he's doing right now

"John sta leggendo" can only mean he's reading something right now


Thanks for your comment.

Hope this helps!

Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

ItalianPod101.com
Tuesday at 10:23 PM
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Hi Jack

The Present Indicative can have 2 meanings:

-habitual actions: John legge sempre un libro la sera=John always reads a book at night

-actions happening now: John legge un libro in camera sua=John's reading a book in his room


The Present Progressive only has 1

-actions happening now: John sta leggendo un libro=John's reading a book

Jack
Thursday at 03:57 AM
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I would like to compare this lesson with the lesson titled "Italian Expressions and Words for the Classroom 1".


In this lesson it says to use the present indicative verb tense when expressing ongoing actions as in "John legge un libro", translated "John is reading a book".


The lesson notes in the other lesson titled "Italian Expressions..." describe the Present Progressive verb tense for what sounds like the same ongoing action as in "La madre sta leggendo alla figlia", translated "The mother is reading to her daughter."


If both are correct, are there situations where it would be better to say "John legge un libro" vs. "John sta leggendo un libro"?


Grazie mille!

ItalianPod101.com
Wednesday at 02:13 AM
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Ciao Reydel Castillo,

alcuni verbi hanno una preposizione specifica dopo. In questo caso è "suggerire + di + infinito".

(some verbs need a specific preposition. In this case, it's "suggerire + di + infinitive")


I hope this answered your question 😁

Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

Reydel Castillo
Sunday at 08:56 PM
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Just to avoid parking tickets 😄😄😄

Reydel Castillo
Friday at 06:34 PM
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Ciao! Ho una domanda di questa fraza.

"I dottori suggeriscono di mangiare molta frutta."

Per che usiamo la parola "di" instead of "a"?


ItalianPod101.com
Tuesday at 02:58 AM
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Hi Joshua,


Thank you for posting.


Please check out the [Lesson Notes] pdf. To download it, go to the [Lesson Notes] section in this page and click on [Download as PDF].👍


Feel free to let us know if you have any questions.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team ItalianPod101.com

Joshua
Sunday at 02:11 AM
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Ciao a tutti.


Where can I see the verb conjugation chart mentioned by Marco on the last part of the lesson?


Grazie tante!


Joshua

ItalianPod101.com
Monday at 03:04 PM
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Hi Nadia,


Thank you for posting and you are welcome!

I'll answer your questions:

- “ok, prendo la giacca e andiamo” is also correct!👍

- "cosa" is a pronoun (=it substitutes a noun) and "che" an adjective. Unlike "cosa," "che" can be followed by a noun.


I hope this helps!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com


Nadia
Saturday at 02:53 PM
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Hi again... another question. In the dialogue he asks, “Che musica ascolti?”, which translates to, “what music do you listen to?” In a previous lesson we learned that “cosa” meant “what”. Why does the speaker use “che” in this dialogue instead of “cosa”? What is the difference between che and cosa? Thanks