Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Ciao.
Marco: Marco here. Lower intermediate series, season 2, Lesson 8. I Didn’t Know You Had Brought Other Girls in Italy.
Consuelo: Hello everyone. I am Consuelo and welcome to italianpod101.
Marco: With us, you will learn to speak Italian with fun and effective lessons.
Consuelo: We also provide you with cultural insights
Marco: And tips you won’t find in a textbook. In this lesson, we will see the congiuntivo trapassato, pluperfect subjunctive.
Consuelo: This conversation takes place in front of Mario’s workplace.
Marco: And it’s between Giulia and Mario.
Consuelo: They are brother and sister. Therefore, they will be speaking informally.
Marco: Now if you are listening on an iPod
Consuelo: Or an iTouch or iPhone.
Marco: Click the center button of the iPod or tap the screen on an iTouch or iPhone to see the notes for this lesson while you listen.
Consuelo: Read along while you listen.
Marco: This technique will help you remember faster. Okay let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Mario: Questa sera chiami mamma?
Giulia: Sì, anche se speravo fosse rimasta a casa, volevo vederla.
Mario: Anche lei vorrebbe vederti più spesso.
Giulia: Se avessi saputo che usciva, sarei partita prima dal supermercato.
Mario: Non ti preoccupare, se la chiami sarà contenta.
Giulia: Ti lascio al tuo lavoro.
Mario: Ciao.
Marco: Let’s here it slowly now.
Mario: Questa sera chiami mamma?
Giulia: Sì, anche se speravo fosse rimasta a casa, volevo vederla.
Mario: Anche lei vorrebbe vederti più spesso.
Giulia: Se avessi saputo che usciva, sarei partita prima dal supermercato.
Mario: Non ti preoccupare, se la chiami sarà contenta.
Giulia: Ti lascio al tuo lavoro.
Mario: Ciao.
Marco: And now, with the translation.
Mario: Questa sera chiami mamma?
Mario: Are you going to call Mother this evening?
Giulia: Sì, anche se speravo fosse rimasta a casa, volevo vederla.
Giulia: Yes. Even though I hoped she had stayed at home, I wanted to see her.
Mario: Anche lei vorrebbe vederti più spesso.
Mario: She’d also like to see you more often.
Giulia: Se avessi saputo che usciva, sarei partita prima dal supermercato.
Giulia: If I had known she was going out, I would have left the supermarket earlier.
Mario: Non ti preoccupare, se la chiami sarà contenta.
Mario: Don’t worry; if you call her, she’ll be happy.
Giulia: Ti lascio al tuo lavoro.
Giulia: I’ll leave you to your work.
Mario: Ciao.
Mario: Bye.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: One of the most common phrases that mothers say to their grownup kids, after not having seen them for a while, is
Consuelo: Stai mangiando? or Mangi abbastanza?
Marco: Are you eating or are you eating enough.
Consuelo: I guess they want to see them fat.
Marco: Don’t they all…Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Marco: The first word we shall see is
Consuelo: Sperare.
Marco: To hope.
Consuelo: Sperare. Sperare.
Marco: And the next word is
Consuelo: Rimanere.
Marco: To stay, remain.
Consuelo: Rimanere. Rimanere
Marco: And the next word is
Consuelo: Prima.
Marco: Earlier.
Consuelo: Prima. Prima
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Preoccuparsi.
Marco: To worry.
Consuelo: Preoccuparsi. Preoccuparsi.
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Contento.
Marco: Happy, content.
Consuelo: Contento. Contento.
Marco: And today’s last word is
Consuelo: Lavoro.
Marco: Work, job.
Consuelo: Lavoro. Lavoro.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Consuelo: The first word we will look at is supermercato.
Marco: Supermarket. Recently supermarkets are everywhere in Italy but some time ago, there was a different type of shop that was called
Consuelo: Latteria.
Marco: It’s like a small supermarket like a sort of convenient store. The difference is it is not open 24 hours a day but it has a very familiar atmosphere. It used to be a
Consuelo: Family owned business.
Marco: So there were some very, very cute old people behind the counter helping us young people get I don’t know the chocolates and stuff like that.
Consuelo: Yes that’s a pity that we don’t have it any more in Italy.
Marco: And the difference between supermercato and latteria is that latteria started as a place where you bought
Consuelo: Latte.
Marco: Milk, and then it became where you could buy bread and other daily necessities.
Consuelo: I miss those times.
Marco: But you are so young.
Consuelo: Yes I know. But in Firenze traditions live longer.

Lesson focus

Marco: Let’s take a look at the grammar point for this lesson. The focus of this lesson is the Italian pluperfect subjunctive.
Consuelo: Se avessi saputo che usciva sarei partita prima dal supermercato.
Marco: If I had known she was going out, I would have left the supermarket earlier. We use the congiuntivo trapassato, the pluperfect subjunctive, when the verb of the main clause is conjugated in any past indicative tense and the action of the secondary clause has taken place before it. For example
Consuelo: Sebbene non avessi studiato passai l’esame.
Marco: Even though I hadn’t studied, I passed the exam.
Consuelo: Speravo che Luisa avesse voluto venire con te.
Marco: I hope Luisa had wanted to come with you.
Consuelo: Ero contenta che voi aveste ritrovato il vostro portafoglio.
Marco: I was happy you’d found your wallet.
Consuelo: The syntax of the pluperfect subjunctive is the following.
Marco: Imperfect subjunctive of the auxiliary verb, either essere or avere, plus pluperfect participle of the main verb.
Consuelo: We are now going to see the pluperfect subjunctive conjugations of essere.
Marco: To be
Consuelo: Avere
Marco: To have
Consuelo: And the three conjugations of regular verbs.
Marco: Here we go.
Consuelo: Essere
Marco: To be.
Consuelo: Congiuntivo trapassato
Marco: Pluperfect subjunctive.
Consuelo: Che io fossi stato
Marco: I had been.
Consuelo: Che tu fossi stato
Marco: You had been.
Consuelo: Che lui fosse stato
Marco: He had been.
Consuelo: Che lei fosse stata
Marco: She had been.
Consuelo: Che noi fossimo stati
Marco: We had been.
Consuelo: Che voi foste stati
Marco: You had been.
Consuelo: Che loro fossero stati
Marco: They had been.
Consuelo: Avere
Marco: To have.
Consuelo: Congiuntivo trapassato.
Marco: Pluperfect subjunctive.
Consuelo: Che io avessi avuto
Marco: I had had.
Consuelo: Che tu avessi avuto
Marco: You had had.
Consuelo: Che lui/lei avesse avuto
Marco: He/she/it had had.
Consuelo: Che noi avessimo avuto
Marco: We had had.
Consuelo: Che voi aveste avuto
Marco: You had had.
Consuelo: Che loro avessero avuto
Marco: They had had. First, second, third conjugations using the auxiliary
Consuelo: Essere
Marco: To be. The verb we should see is
Consuelo: Stare
Marco: To stay.
Consuelo: Congiuntivo trapassato
Marco: Pluperfect subjunctive.
Consuelo: Che io fossi stato
Marco: I had stayed.
Consuelo: Che tu fossi stato
Marco: You had stayed.
Consuelo: Che lui fosse stato
Marco: He had stayed.
Consuelo: Che lei fosse stata
Marco: She had stayed.
Consuelo: Che noi fossimo stati
Marco: We had stayed.
Consuelo: Che voi foste stati
Marco: You had stayed.
Consuelo: Che loro fossero stati
Marco: They had stayed. Now we should see the auxiliary
Consuelo: Avere
Marco: To have using as example the verb
Consuelo: Amare
Marco: To love.
Consuelo: Congiuntivo trapassato.
Marco: Pluperfect subjunctive.
Consuelo: Che io avessi amato
Marco: I had loved.
Consuelo: Che tu avessi amato
Marco: You had loved.
Consuelo: Che lui/lei avesse amato
Marco: He/she/it had loved.
Consuelo: Che noi avessimo amato
Marco: We had loved.
Consuelo: Che voi aveste amato
Marco: You had loved.
Consuelo: Che loro avessero amato
Marco: They had loved.

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today. Okay some of our listeners already know about the most powerful tool on italianpod101.com
Consuelo: Line by line audio.
Marco: The perfect tool for rapidly improving listening comprehension.
Consuelo: By listening to lines of the conversation again and again.
Marco: Listen until every word and syllable becomes clear. Basically, we break down the dialogue into comprehensible bite size sentences.
Consuelo: You can try the line by line audio in the premium learning center at italianpod101.com
Marco: Ciao.
Consuelo: Ciao.

14 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 02:13 PM
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Hi Antonette,


Thank you for the reply!

Grazie per la risposta!


Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Antonette
Thursday at 08:34 PM
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Perfetto.Gracie

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 04:39 PM
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Hi Antonette,


The pluperfect "avessi comprato" refers to an action which was made before an action done in the past.

The past "abbia comprato" refers to an action done before the present moment.

Please compare these two examples:

1. Non so se la mamma abbia comprato le mele. - "I don't know (present) whether mum bought the apples."

2. Non sapevo se la mamma avesse comprato le mele. - "I didn't know (past) whether mum had bought the apples."


I hope this helps!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Antonette
Friday at 10:49 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Please explain the difference in usage in the pluperfect subjunctive and the imperfect subjunctive. In English we often discard the word "have" when using the past tense, so the difference btween "abbia comprato" and "avessi comprato" is difficult to apply.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 09:08 AM
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Prego! :smile:


Grazie a te!


Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Jamilet Couret-Bryant
Tuesday at 09:25 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

:smile: Grazie Ofelia,


Devo ricordare che è "in", quando si parla di andare "in" un paese!


Grazie ancora per tutto il tuo aiuto.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 04:55 PM
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Ciao Seth e Jamilet,


Grazie per i commenti!:smile:

Jamilet, that's right! "It would have been" is "sarebbe stato" and "stasera" needs to be written in one word (it's fixed now)!

Notice only one little thing: "all'Italia" should be "in Italia".


Keep up the good work!:thumbsup:

Ciao a tutti!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Jamilet Couret-Bryant
Monday at 11:40 PM
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Ciao Seth & Italian Pod 101 Staff,

Like you, I am a student but for "It would have been...", I would use "Sarebbe stato..." For example:

It would have been nice to go to Italy last summer.

Sarebbe stato bello andare all'Italia l'estate scorsa.

I also have a question for the Italian Pod Staff, in the sentece "Finiamo prima sta sera.", shouldn't "stasera" be one word since it's a contraction of "questa sera"?

Seth
Sunday at 06:10 AM
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Ciao Ofelia o Consuelo. Come se dici 'It would have been.."? Useresti la parola "sarebbe"?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 08:29 AM
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Hello Ed,


We're going to record them soon and update the lesson. Thank you for pointing it out though!!

If you have any questions or suggestions, please do let us know :)


Happy learning :cool:


Cheers,

Neha/ItalianPod101.com