Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Ciao a tutti.
Marco: Marco here. Lower intermediate series, season 2, Lesson 22. How Loud Can It Get in Italian? Hello and welcome to the italianpod101.com, the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn Italian.
Consuelo: I am Consuelo and thanks again for being here with us for these lower intermediate series, season 2 lesson.
Marco: In today’s class, we will focus on subordinate clauses that may be followed by verbs conjugated in the subjunctive mood. Moreover, we will see the present subjunctive conjugation of the irregular verb Dire.
Consuelo: This conversation takes place at the concert’s venue.
Marco: The conversation is between Jack and Giulia.
Consuelo: The speakers are friends. Therefore they will be speaking informally.
Marco: Attention listeners! Comment.
Consuelo: Comment
Marco: And comment some more.
Consuelo: It’s easy.
Marco: And asking questions really helps improve progress. Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Jack: Per fortuna abbiamo trovato i biglietti.
Giulia: Davvero. Sembra che ti piaccia questa musica.
Jack: Il gruppo mi piace, poi le tue amiche sono delle ragazze molto simpatiche e socievoli.
Giulia: Aspetta, ho ricevuto una telefonata, che sia stato Mario a chiamarmi? Ah no, è un messaggio.
Jack: È Mario?
Giulia: Sì... Ecco, dice che non vengono perchè ormai è tardi e il concerto è già iniziato. Che bugiardo!
Jack: No dai, non credo che dica stupidaggini.
Giulia: Tu ancora non conosci mio fratello!
Marco: Let’s here it slowly now.
Jack: Per fortuna abbiamo trovato i biglietti.
Giulia: Davvero. Sembra che ti piaccia questa musica.
Jack: Il gruppo mi piace, poi le tue amiche sono delle ragazze molto simpatiche e socievoli.
Giulia: Aspetta, ho ricevuto una telefonata, che sia stato Mario a chiamarmi? Ah no, è un messaggio.
Jack: È Mario?
Giulia: Sì... Ecco, dice che non vengono perchè ormai è tardi e il concerto è già iniziato. Che bugiardo!
Jack: No dai, non credo che dica stupidaggini.
Giulia: Tu ancora non conosci mio fratello!
Marco: And now, with the translation.
Jack: Per fortuna abbiamo trovato i biglietti.
Jack: Fortunately, we found the tickets.
Giulia: Davvero. Sembra che ti piaccia questa musica.
Giulia: True. It seems that you like this music.
Jack: Il gruppo mi piace, poi le tue amiche sono delle ragazze molto simpatiche e socievoli.
Jack: I like the band, and your friends are very nice and sociable girls.
Giulia: Aspetta, ho ricevuto una telefonata, che sia stato Mario a chiamarmi? Ah no, è un messaggio.
Giulia: Wait, I received a phone call. Is it possible it was Mario? Ah, no. It's a message.
Jack: È Mario?
Jack: Is that Mario?
Giulia: Sì... Ecco, dice che non vengono perchè ormai è tardi e il concerto è già iniziato. Che bugiardo!
Giulia: Yes…he's saying that they're not coming because it's too late and the concert has already started. What a liar!
Jack: No dai, non credo che dica stupidaggini.
Jack: Hey, come on! I don't think he says foolish things.
Giulia: Tu ancora non conosci mio fratello!
Giulia: You don't know my brother yet!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: Is it normal to use SMS, the Short Message System, in Italy?
Consuelo: Oh yes, it’s so popular. We use SMS for everything because, in general, calling is more expensive.
Marco: Really?
Consuelo: We use SMS on many occasions, sometimes even at work.
Marco: Okay but Italian words are so long. Isn’t it tiring to write sentences with a mobile phone?
Consuelo: Yes, you are right. That’s why we started to use a sort of code to write these messages in order to make the words shorter.
Marco: I see. So if I want to write I am sorry, mi dispiace, what should I write?
Consuelo: Just: mi disp.
Marco: Oh interesting. Thanks Consuelo. Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Marco: The first word we shall see is
Consuelo: Simpatico.
Marco: Nice, funny, likable.
Consuelo: Simpatico. Simpatico.
Marco: And the next word is
Consuelo: Socievole.
Marco: Sociable, social, genial.
Consuelo: Socievole. Socievole.
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Messaggio.
Marco: Message.
Consuelo: Messaggio. Messaggio.
Marco: And the next word is
Consuelo: Ormai.
Marco: Now, by now.
Consuelo: Ormai. Ormai.
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Bugiardo.
Marco: Liar, untruthful, false.
Consuelo: Bugiardo. Bugiardo.
Marco: And finally we have
Consuelo: Stupidaggine.
Marco: Stupid thing, foolish thing, crock.
Consuelo: Stupidaggine. Stupidaggine.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Consuelo, which word are we studying today?
Consuelo: That’s the Italian word simpatico.
Marco: And it means nice, funny, likable. So when do we use this word?
Consuelo: In Italy, we use this word a lot to describe people but we can use it even for other things.
Marco: For instance,
Consuelo: Ha avuto un’idea molto simpatica, meaning he had such a nice idea but you know Marco, if someone or something is simpatico in Italy, we immediately think of someone or something hilarious.
Marco: Ah and what is the contrary of simpatico?
Consuelo: That’s antipatico, which means unlikable, unpleasant. In Italy, it’s the first thing we ask someone who has recently met someone else for the first time: è simpatico? è simpatica?
Consuelo: Let’s take a look at today’s grammar point.

Lesson focus

Marco: The focus of this lesson is on subordinate clauses which may be followed by verbs conjugated in the subjunctive mood. Moreover we will see the present subjunctive conjugation of the regular verb
Consuelo: Dire,
Marco: To say, to tell. First of all, the subjunctive mood may be used in the main clause to express the desire, exhortation or a supposition. For example
Consuelo: Io desidero che ogni persona possa vivere felice.
Marco: I wish that every person may live happily.
Consuelo: Siate così gentili da aspettare altri due giorni.
Marco: Please be so kind as to wait another two days.
Consuelo: Ho ricevuto una telefonata. Che sia stata Silvia a chiamarmi?
Marco: I received a phone call. Is it possible it was Silvia? The subjunctive mood may also be used when we formulate a main clause whose verb expresses an opinion.
Consuelo: The so called opinion verbs.
Marco: In this case, the subjunctive mood is employed in the secondary clause only when the subjects of both clauses do not coincide. For instance
Consuelo: Lui pensa che voi siate intelligente.
Marco: He thinks that you are intelligent.
Consuelo: Antonio ha ritenuto che questa fosse la soluzione più appropriata.
Marco: Antonio deemed this solution to be the most appropriate.
Consuelo: Loro credono che voi siate italiani.
Marco: They believe that you are Italian. Please note that when the subjects of the main and subordinate phrases coincide, we tend to use the construction Di plus infinitive either present or past in a secondary clause. For example
Consuelo: Io penso di essere intelligente.
Marco: I think I am intelligent.
Consuelo: Antonio ha ritenuto di avere avuto molta fortuna.
Marco: Antonio deemed himself to have been very lucky.
Consuelo: Loro credono di essere italiani.
Marco: They think they are Italian. Finally the subjects of the main and subordinate phrases may both be omitted so long as they can be inferred from the context. For instance
Consuelo: Noi siamo arrivati a Milano. Pensavamo che fosse più rumorosa.
Marco: We arrived in Milan. We thought it was noisier.
Consuelo: Luisa è innamorata di John. Pensa sempre che sia con lei.
Marco: Luisa is in love with John. She always thinks he is with her.
Consuelo: I ragazzi hanno giocato una partita. Pensavano che fosse facile vincere.
Marco: The guys played a match. They thought it was easy to win it. And now, let’s look at the conjugation in the present subjunctive of the irregular verb
Consuelo: Dire.
Marco: To say, to tell.
Consuelo: Che io dica
Marco: I say.
Consuelo: Che tu dica
Marco: You say.
Consuelo: Che lui/lei dica
Marco: He/she/it says.
Consuelo: Che noi diciamo
Marco: We say.
Consuelo: Che voi diciate
Marco: You say.
Consuelo: Che loro dicano
Marco: They say.

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today. Consuelo, I’d like to share a study tip a listener shared with us.
Consuelo: Ah you are talking about the student who uses just the conversation tracks to review the lessons.
Marco: Consuelo, you read my mind. Yes a listener of ours listened to each lesson several times.
Consuelo: Then afterward get the conversation only track from our site.
Marco: She then listens to them on shuffle again and again. She created her own immersion program using italianpod101.com
Consuelo: This is a great idea. Please give it a try and let us know what you think.
Marco: Okay. Buonasera a tutti.
Consuelo: A presto.

4 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:30 PM
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I really enjoy the lessons i am picking up some words. They are very interactive amd keep you interested in the dialogue i listen to the audio lessons on my iphone its great!

Ruggero
Thursday at 11:12 AM
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Hi Gianna,

Yes, the correct word is "collega". In the sample sentences of this lesson, I see it also says "collega"... can you show me where you found the other spelling? Thanks :)

Gianna
Monday at 09:31 PM
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Ciao!


Nel "Vocabulary Sample Sentences" avete scritto "Il mio COLLEGE di lavoro non è molto socievole." Ho pensato che la parola per "colleague" era "collega". Che pensate?


Gianna

Consuelo
Tuesday at 04:13 PM
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Hi Loretta!!

We're very happy you're enjoying our lessons. :grin:

Please continue following us, we're adding new lessons, audioblogs, and so on.


Ciao ciao e grazie,

Consuelo