Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Buonasera a tutti.
Marco: Marco here. Lower intermediate series, season 2, Lesson 20. Something in Italy Smells Fishy! Hello and welcome to the lower intermediate series, season 2 at italianpod101.com where we study modern Italian in a fun, educational format.
Consuelo: So brush up on the Italian that you started learning long ago or start learning today.
Marco: Thanks for being here with us for this lesson. Consuelo, what are we looking at in this lesson?
Consuelo: In today’s lesson, we will focus on subordinate clauses that may be followed by verbs conjugated in the subjunctive mood. Moreover, we will see the present subjunctive conjugation of the irregular verb Sapere.
Marco: This conversation takes place in front of Jack’s house on the street.
Consuelo: The conversation is between Jack and Giulia.
Marco: The speakers are not friends. Therefore they will be speaking formally.
Consuelo: Listeners, I have a question.
Marco: A question.
Consuelo: Yep. I want to know when was the last time you commented.
Marco: Ah yes, great question.
Consuelo: Stop by italianpod101.com, leave us a comment or just say hi.
Marco: Okay, you heard Consuelo. Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Giulia: Hey Jack! Sono qui!
Jack: Ah, ciao! Tu devi essere Giulia!
Giulia: Sì, sono io, piacere.
Jack: Piacere, Jack. Ma Mario non c'è?
Giulia: No è rimasto a casa.
Jack: Perchè è stanco? Oggi è stato stancante a lavoro.
Giulia: No, Mario è rimasto a casa non perchè fosse stanco, ma a causa della sua ragazza.
Jack: Perchè? Hanno litigato?
Giulia: Per quel che ne sappia no. Credo che lei lo abbia invitato ad una cena di famiglia questa sera.
Jack: Che peccato!
Giulia: Probabilmente ci raggiungono più tardi. Addesso andiamo che le mie amiche sono ansiose di conoscerti. Poi dobbiamo ancora trovare i biglietti per il concerto.
Jack: Cosa?
Marco: Let’s here it slowly now.
Giulia: Hey Jack! Sono qui!
Jack: Ah, ciao! Tu devi essere Giulia!
Giulia: Sì, sono io, piacere.
Jack: Piacere, Jack. Ma Mario non c'è?
Giulia: No è rimasto a casa.
Jack: Perchè è stanco? Oggi è stato stancante a lavoro.
Giulia: No, Mario è rimasto a casa non perchè fosse stanco, ma a causa della sua ragazza.
Jack: Perchè? Hanno litigato?
Giulia: Per quel che ne sappia no. Credo che lei lo abbia invitato ad una cena di famiglia questa sera.
Jack: Che peccato!
Giulia: Probabilmente ci raggiungono più tardi. Addesso andiamo che le mie amiche sono ansiose di conoscerti. Poi dobbiamo ancora trovare i biglietti per il concerto.
Jack: Cosa?
Marco: And now, with the translation.
Giulia: Hey Jack! Sono qui!
Giulia: Hey, Jack! I'm here!
Jack: Ah, ciao! Tu devi essere Giulia!
Jack: Ah, hello! You must be Giulia!
Giulia: Sì, sono io, piacere.
Giulia: Yes, it's me, nice to meet you.
Jack: Piacere, Jack. Ma Mario non c'è?
Jack: Nice to meet you, I'm Jack. But Mario isn't here?
Giulia: No è rimasto a casa.
Giulia: No, he stayed at home.
Jack: Perchè è stanco? Oggi è stato stancante a lavoro.
Jack: Why? Is he tired? Today, it was tiring at work.
Giulia: No, Mario è rimasto a casa non perchè fosse stanco, ma a causa della sua ragazza.
Giulia: No, Mario stayed at home, not because he was tired, but due to his girlfriend.
Jack: Perchè? Hanno litigato?
Jack: Why? Did they fight?
Giulia: Per quel che ne sappia no. Credo che lei lo abbia invitato ad una cena di famiglia questa sera.
Giulia: As far as I know, no. I think she invited him for a dinner with her family tonight.
Jack: Che peccato!
Jack: What a pity!
Giulia: Probabilmente ci raggiungono più tardi. Addesso andiamo che le mie amiche sono ansiose di conoscerti. Poi dobbiamo ancora trovare i biglietti per il concerto.
Giulia: They will probably join us later. Now let's go. My friends are anxious to meet you. Then we still have to find the tickets for the concert.
Jack: Cosa?
Jack: What?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: Consuelo, in Italy, is it normal to go to a concert without ticket?
Consuelo: Umm I can say yes.
Marco: But isn’t it better if you buy it in advance?
Consuelo: Well yes but sometimes there are people selling half price tickets at the concert venue.
Marco: I mean, really?
Consuelo: Yes. It depends on what kind of concert you want to go to. Sometimes you need prevendite for famous singers and bands.
Marco: Ah you mean presale ticket.
Consuelo: Yes Marco.
Marco: Interesting. Thanks Consuelo.
Marco: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is
VOCAB LIST
Marco: The first word we shall see is
Consuelo: Stancante.
Marco: Tiring.
Consuelo: Stancante. Stancante.
Marco: And the next word is
Consuelo: Litigare.
Marco: Fight, argue, quarrel, dispute.
Consuelo: Litigare. Litigare.
Marco: And the next word is
Consuelo: Probabilmente.
Marco: Probably, perhaps.
Consuelo: Probabilmente.
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Raggiungere.
Marco: To reach, achieve, contact, arrive, join.
Consuelo: Raggiungere. Raggiungere.
Marco: And then we have
Consuelo: Ansioso.
Marco: Anxious, nervous, unquiet.
Consuelo: Ansioso. Ansioso.
Marco: And finally we have
Consuelo: Biglietto.
Marco: Ticket, note, card, banknote.
Consuelo: Biglietto. Biglietto.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Consuelo, which word are we studying today?
Consuelo: That’s the Italian word biglietto.
Marco: Ticket, card, note.
Consuelo: This is a very useful word especially if you travel in Italy. Have you ever heard a man screaming on the train “biglietti prego”, checking passengers tickets?
Marco: Oh yes he shouts, tickets please. I have a question though. In Italy, do we have one way tickets and roundtrip tickets?
Consuelo: Sure, those are biglietto di sola andata and biglietto andata e ritorno. But you know Marco, we also use biglietto to talk about business cards.
Marco: And how do you call it?
Consuelo: Biglietto da visita. But there are other usages of biglietto. For example, biglietto di auguri.
Marco: Greeting card?
Consuelo: Yes and I can also say to you: lasciami un biglietto sul frigo, leave me a note on the fridge.
Marco: You are right Consuelo. Biglietto is a very useful word.
Consuelo: Let’s take a look at today’s grammar point.

Lesson focus

Marco: The focus of this lesson is on subordinate clauses which may be followed by verbs conjugated in the subjunctive mood. We will also see the present subjunctive conjugation of the regular verb
Consuelo: Sapere,
Marco: To know, to be aware of. And the subjunctive mood may be employed in phrases that express the cause of a previous statement instead of the indicative tense normally required by the tense agreement.
Consuelo: This type of phrase is normally introduced by Non perché
Marco: Not because. For instance
Consuelo: Io vado a fare shopping, non perché abbia bisogno di abiti nuovi ma semplicemente perché mi piace. Or: io vado a fare shopping, non perché ho bisogno di abiti nuovi ma semplicemente perché mi piace
Marco: I go shopping not because I need new clothes, but simply because I like it.
Consuelo: Mario è rimasto a casa, non perché fosse stanco ma a caausa della sua ragazza. Or: Mario è rimasto a casa, non perché era stanco ma a caausa della sua ragazza
Marco: Mario stayed at home not because he was tired but due to his girlfriend.
Consuelo: Noi siamo andati a Boston, non perché volessimo fare una vacanza ma perché eravamo interessati ad una conferenza. Or: noi siamo andati a Boston, non perché volevamo fare una vacanza ma perché eravamo interessati ad una conferenza.
Marco: We went to Boston not because we wanted to go on vacation but because we were interested in a conference. The subjunctive mood may be employed in subordinate phrases that specify the limits of the main statement instead of indicative tenses usually required by the tense agreement.
Consuelo: This kind of phrase is normally introduced by expressions such as per quel che and per quanto: as long as, as far as, etcetera.
Marco: Please note that the subordinate clauses may be inserted either before or after the main phrase. For instance
Consuelo: Serena è sposata, per quel che ne so. Or: Serena è sposata, per quel che ne sappia.
Marco: As far as I know, Serena is married.
Consuelo: Per quanto concerne la credibilità, quel politico non sta facendo un buon lavoro. Or: per quanto concerna la credibilità, quel politico non sta facendo un buon lavoro.
Marco: As far as credibility is concerned, that politician is not doing a good job.
Consuelo: Per quel che ne sappiamo, nessuno ha mai consegnato il pacco. Or: per quel che sappiamo, nessuno ha mai consegnato il pacco.
Marco: As far as we know, nobody delivered the package. Please note that in the last sentence, the first plural person of the indicativo presente and the present subjunctive had the same form. And now, let’s take a look at the conjugation of the present subjunctive of the irregular verb
Consuelo: Sapere,
Marco: To know, to be aware of.
Consuelo: Che io sappia
Marco: I know.
Consuelo: Che tu sappia
Marco: You know.
Consuelo: Che lui/lei sappia
Marco: He/she/it knows.
Consuelo: Che noi sappiamo
Marco: We know.
Consuelo: Che voi sappiate
Marco: You know.
Consuelo: Che loro sappiano
Marco: They know.

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today. Testing yourself is one of the most effective ways to learn.
Consuelo: That’s why we have three types of quizzes.
Marco: Vocabulary, grammar and content specific.
Consuelo: Each quiz targets specific skill.
Marco: And together, these quizzes will help you master several fundamental skills.
Consuelo: You can find them in the learning center at
Marco: Italianpod101.com. A presto.
Consuelo: Ciao ciao.

9 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:30 PM
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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 09:39 AM
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Hi Antonette,


Good catch! In both cases it's optional 👍


Keep up the good work!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Antonette
Sunday at 01:23 AM
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The “non perche” examples in this lesson seem identical to the false causes in Lesson 17. Is there a difference I am not discerning, or is the subjunctive optional in the Lesson 17 examples as well.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 11:43 AM
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Hi George Boccanfuso,


Va bene, eviteremo le esclamazioni in inglese! : )

In italiano "hey!" si dice "ehi!" ed è molto comune.


All right, we will avoid exclamations in English! :)

In Italian "hey!" is translated as "ehi!" and is very common.


Grazie mille,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

George Boccanfuso
Thursday at 05:46 AM
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Please do not use english words e.g. "Hey".

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 09:08 AM
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Hi Antonette,


Thank you for posting.

Either is correct!


Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Antonette
Wednesday at 10:10 PM
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Is the subjunctive tense entirely optional in these instances? Or is one more correct than the other?

Consuelo
Tuesday at 03:43 PM
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Hi Aldo,

My name is Consuelo and I'm a member of Italianpod101.com

Don't forget that the past participle of "scrivere" is "scritto"!:wink:


Credo che lei LO abbia invitato ad una cena….”

In this case we use the pronoun "LO" reffering to her boyfriend, if you drop it saying

” Credo che lei abbia invitato ad un una cena di ”

It's not clear who the girl has invited to the dinner and it sounds a little bit unnatural.


Thank you for your comment,

grazie mille,


Consuelo

Aldo
Sunday at 07:37 PM
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Perché ha scrivato" Credo che lei LO abbia invitato ad una cena...."

Posso dire " Credo che lei abbia invitato ad un una cena di "


Grazie


Aldo