Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Ciao a tutti.
Marco: Marco here. Lower intermediate series, season 2, Lesson 14. The Best Part of Waking up Is Italian Coffee in Your Cup! Hello and welcome to the italianpod101.com, the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn Italian.
Consuelo: I’m Consuelo and thanks again for being here with us for this lower intermediate series, season 2 lesson.
Marco: In today’s class, we will study the Italian subjunctive mood and the present subjunctive conjugation of the irregular verb Volere.
Consuelo: This conversation takes place at the coffee shop.
Marco: The conversation is between Mario and his customers.
Consuelo: The speakers are not friends. Therefore they will be speaking formally.
Marco: If you don’t already have one
Consuelo: Stop by italianpod101.com
Marco: And sign up for your free lifetime account.
Consuelo: You can sign up in less than 30 seconds.
Marco: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Mario: Buongiorno signora Silvia! Non pensa che oggi sia una bella giornata? Prego, entri pure!
Silvia: Buongiorno! La ringrazio. Posso avere un caffè?
Mario: Ma certo, come glielo preparo? Espresso, americano, marocchino?
Silvia: Mmm sono indecisa, sembrano tutti deliziosi.
Mario: Non si preoccupi signora, qualunque scelta lei faccia, il nostro caffè è della migliore qualità!
Silvia: Me lo dia espresso doppio allora, che ho bisogno di svegliarmi.
Mario: Uè Rocco, buongiorno!
Rocco: (entra) Buon giorno Mario, dammi il solito, grazie.
Mario: Come va con il film? Sa signora Silvia, Rocco è un regista.
Silvia: Ah si?
Rocco: Si signora, ultimamente stiamo girando un film qui a Milano.
Silvia: Che bello! Posso venire a vedere il set ogni tanto?
Rocco: Ma certo, prego signora! Chiunque voglia venire sul set è il benvenuto, anche tu Mario!
Marco: Let’s here it slowly now.
Mario: Buongiorno signora Silvia! Non pensa che oggi sia una bella giornata? Prego, entri pure!
Silvia: Buongiorno! La ringrazio. Posso avere un caffè?
Mario: Ma certo, come glielo preparo? Espresso, americano, marocchino?
Silvia: Mmm sono indecisa, sembrano tutti deliziosi.
Mario: Non si preoccupi signora, qualunque scelta lei faccia, il nostro caffè è della migliore qualità!
Silvia: Me lo dia espresso doppio allora, che ho bisogno di svegliarmi.
Mario: Uè Rocco, buongiorno!
Rocco: (entra) Buon giorno Mario, dammi il solito, grazie.
Mario: Come va con il film? Sa signora Silvia, Rocco è un regista.
Silvia: Ah si?
Rocco: Si signora, ultimamente stiamo girando un film qui a Milano.
Silvia: Che bello! Posso venire a vedere il set ogni tanto?
Rocco: Ma certo, prego signora! Chiunque voglia venire sul set è il benvenuto, anche tu Mario!
Marco: And now, with the translation.
Mario: Buongiorno signora Silvia! Non pensa che oggi sia una bella giornata? Prego, entri pure!
Mario: Good morning, Mrs. Silvia! Don't you think today is a lovely day? Please, come in!
Silvia: Buongiorno! La ringrazio. Posso avere un caffè?
Silvia: Good morning! Thank you. Can I have a coffee?
Mario: Ma certo, come glielo preparo? Espresso, americano, marocchino?
Mario: Sure, how do you want it? Espresso, American, Moroccan?
Silvia: Mmm sono indecisa, sembrano tutti deliziosi.
Silvia: Mmm. I'm undecided. They all look delicious.
Mario: Non si preoccupi signora, qualunque scelta lei faccia, il nostro caffè è della migliore qualità!
Mario: Don't worry, whatever you choose, our coffee is of the best quality!
Silvia: Me lo dia espresso doppio allora, che ho bisogno di svegliarmi.
Silvia: Then I'll have an espresso, double please. I need to wake up.
Mario: Uè Rocco, buongiorno!
Mario: Hey Rocco, good morning!
Rocco: (entra) Buon giorno Mario, dammi il solito, grazie.
Rocco: (enters) Good morning, Mario, I'll have the usual one, thanks.
Mario: Come va con il film? Sa signora Silvia, Rocco è un regista.
Mario: How is it going with the movie? You know Silvia, Rocco is a director.
Silvia: Ah si?
Silvia: Oh, really?
Rocco: Si signora, ultimamente stiamo girando un film qui a Milano.
Rocco: Yes, madam. Lately, we are shooting a movie here in Milan.
Silvia: Che bello! Posso venire a vedere il set ogni tanto?
Silvia: How beautiful! Could I come to see the set from time to time?
Rocco: Ma certo, prego signora! Chiunque voglia venire sul set è il benvenuto, anche tu Mario!
Rocco: Sure, be my guest! Whoever wants to come to the set is welcome you too, Mario!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: What can we tell our listeners about Italian coffee shops?
Consuelo: First of all, they are one of the things Italy is most famous for, our delicious coffee.
Marco: Let me ask something. How many different ways do you have to prepare coffee in Italy?
Consuelo: That’s tricky Marco. As far as I remember, I can count around 15 different ways to prepare coffee mixing it with milk or chocolate.
Marco: That’s impressive.
Consuelo: We have the usual Espresso, then the one laced with Alcohol until the more recent Maroccan and Capciock, similar to Cappuccino but both done with chocolate and coffee. The list is pretty long for a lot of ways to prepare it.
Marco: My mouth is watering now.
Marco: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Marco: The first word we shall see is
Consuelo: Giornata.
Marco: Day.
Consuelo: Giornata. Giornata.
Marco: And the next word is
Consuelo: Entrare.
Marco: To go in, come in, enter.
Consuelo: Entrare. Entrare.
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Caffè.
Marco: Coffee.
Consuelo: Caffè. Caffè.
Marco: And the next word is
Consuelo: Preparare.
Marco: To prepare, make, set, arrange.
Consuelo: Preparare. Preparare.
Marco: And next we have
Consuelo: Delizioso.
Marco: Delightful, delicious.
Consuelo: Delizioso. Delizioso.
Marco: And finally
Consuelo: Ultimamente.
Marco: Lately, off late.
Consuelo: Ultimamente. Ultimamente.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: So Consuelo, what’s today’s word?
Consuelo: That’s the Italian Dai.
Marco: It means come on.
Consuelo: Yes but in Italian conversations, it is used much more than the English counterpart.
Marco: Does dai also have other meanings?
Consuelo: Yes, for example, when your team scores a goal during a soccer match, we say E dai! meaning right on.
Marco: Hah that’s true but I was thinking about
Consuelo: Dai Marco, pay attention.
Consuelo: Let’s take a look at today’s grammar point.

Lesson focus

Marco: Today we are going to focus on the study of the
Consuelo: Modo Congiuntivo.
Marco: Subjunctive mood.
Consuelo: And in addition, we will see the present subjunctive conjugation of the regular verb Volere.
Marco: To want, wish. The use of the subjunctive mood is required after certain verbs which we can broadly call opinion verbs.
Consuelo: These are personal or impersonal verbs that express opinions or superficial appearances.
Marco: Let’s see a few examples.
Consuelo: Penso che sia una bella giornata.
Marco: I think it’s a beautiful day.
Consuelo: Sembra strano che Luca non voglia vedere Lucia.
Marco: It seems strange that Luca doesn’t want to see Lucia.
Consuelo: Credevo che tu pagassi la bolletta.
Marco: I thought you would pay the bill. The tense agreement depends on the action expressed in the secondary clause.
Consuelo: Please refer to the previous lower intermediate lessons for additional details.
Marco: The subjunctive mood is also used after the following indefinite pronouns and conjunctions.
Consuelo: Chiunque.
Marco: Pronoun: whoever, whomever.
Consuelo: Qualunque.
Marco: Pronoun: whoever, whatever, whichever.
Consuelo: Ovunque, dovunque.
Marco: As a conjunction wherever.
Consuelo: Comunque.
Marco: As a conjunction, no matter. For example.
Consuelo: Chiunque voglia venire è il benvenuto.
Marco: Whoever wants to come is welcome.
Consuelo: Qualunque scelta tu prenda io ti appoggerò.
Marco: Whatever choice you take, I will support you.
Consuelo: Non mi dimenticherò di te, ovunque io sia.
Marco: I won’t forget you wherever I will be.
Consuelo: Comunque vada il tuo esame, hai fatto del tuo meglio.
Marco: No matter how your exam goes, you did your best. Please note that when dovunque and comunque are used as adverbs, the following verb, if any, does not need to be conjugated at a subjunctive mood. For instance
Consuelo: Ho cercato il tuo portafoglio dovunque.
Marco: I looked for your wallet everywhere.
Consuelo: Hai fatto bene ad aspettarmi, comunque non dovevi.
Marco: I appreciate you waiting for me though you didn’t have to.
Consuelo: The verb volere,
Marco: To want, wish,
Consuelo: Follows an irregular conjugation at the congiuntivo presente,
Marco: Present subjunctive.
Consuelo: As you will notice in the following conjugation volere.
Marco: To want, wish.
Consuelo: Che io voglia
Marco: I want.
Consuelo: Che tu voglia
Marco: You want
Consuelo: Che lui/lei voglia
Marco: He/she/it wants.
Consuelo: Che noi vogliamo
Marco: We want.
Consuelo: Che voi vogliate
Marco: You want.
Consuelo: Che loro vogliano
Marco: They want.

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today. Premium members, use the review track to perfect your pronunciation.
Consuelo: Available in the premium section of the website.
Marco: The learning center
Consuelo: And through iTunes via the premium feed.
Marco: The review track gives you vocabulary and phrases followed by a short pause. So you can repeat the words aloud.
Consuelo: The best way to get good fast.
Marco: Okay, arrivederci.
Consuelo: A presto.

12 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 08:36 AM
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Hi Antonette,


Except for the second person (either singular or plural), we use the subjunctive to make the imperative form in Italian.

The verb "dare" goes like this:

tu da' (imperative)

egli/lui dia (subjunctive)

noi diamo (subjunctive)

voi date (imperative)

loro diano (subjunctive)


I hope this helps!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Antonette
Friday at 06:36 AM
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One more question:


Why does Silva answer using the subjective, i.e. Me lo dia espresso doppio allora?


Gracie

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 02:41 PM
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Hi Antonette,


They are almost the same. The only slight nuance is that "giorno" and "sera" refer more to "day" and "evening" as concepts/ideas of time, while "giornata" and "serata" refer to the different condition of the sky, the temperature, the air.

For example: "Una giornata fredda" ("a cold day") VS "Che giorno è oggi?" ("What day is today?")

Though you can say "un giorno freddo", you cannot say "Che giornata è oggi" to mean "What day is today? (ex. today is November 5th)", because it would mean something like "what kind of day is today? (cold, hot, boring,...)"

In other words, "giorno" and "sera" have a wider meaning than "giornata" and "serata."



I hope this helps!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Antonette
Friday at 12:29 AM
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Is there a nuance between the meaning of giornata instead of giorno? Or sera and serata?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 10:29 AM
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Ciao Johnny,



“Non pensa che sia una bella giornata”

We can’t use “sono” or “sto” because the subject is “giornata” (day), which needs the third person singular form. Also it’s better to use the subjunctive (“sia”) instead of the the indicative mood (“è”), because the main verb is a “thinking verb”.


“Chiunque voglia venire è il benvenuto”

“Chiunque” always need the third person singular form, even if it refers to more people. In this case you could also use the indicative and say “Chiunque vuole venire è il benvenuto.”


I hope this helps!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Johnny
Saturday at 03:08 AM
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You have the sentence, "Chiunque voglia venire è il benvenuto" for "Whoever wants to come is welcome". Why can't you use "Chiunque volete venire è il benvenuto"? How does that change the meaning?

Johnny
Saturday at 03:00 AM
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Basic question, in the sentence "Non pensa che oggi sia una bella giornata?" why couldn't you place "sono" or "sto" instead of "sia"? How would it change the meaning?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 02:30 PM
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Hello Cinzia,


Thanks for pointing out.


Marocchino means from Marocco, but it can be used often as a negative thing.


- As emigrant from a under developed country.

- As street seller usually those who have lighter or cheap goods ( originally those where from the African west coast like Cote d' voir not Morocco) but people kept and using that word to tag them, not sure why.

Cheers!


Ruggero


Team ItalianPod101.com

Cinzia
Tuesday at 03:52 PM
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In Line by line e anche piu' giu in one of the multiple choice tests

"La ringrazio" is spelled "La rigrazio". :-)


"marocchino" si usa solo al nord? Ho passato molto tempo a Napoli e in Basilicata (e anche a Perugia) e non l'ho mai sentito nominato o forse non ho fatto caso.

Lisa
Friday at 11:45 AM
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Grazie per la risposta.