Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Cinzia: Ciao. My name is Cinzia.
Marco: Ciao a tutti. Marco here. Lower intermediate series, season 1, Lesson 4. This Italian Bread Shouldn’t Make You Fat? What’s today’s setting Cinzia?
Cinzia: Today’s setting is a bakery
Marco: Where a friendly customer enquires if work is going well.
Cinzia: We will be discussing some Italian eating habits and how they change over different generations.
Marco: Before we start today’s dialogue, please remember to check the vocabulary flash cards that now have Cinzia’s voice. She can be also there. She is everywhere.
Cinzia: Yes, sono ovunque.
Marco: Yes I am everywhere. I will be the customer while Cinzia will be the shopkeeper.
DIALOGUE
Customer: Come va il lavoro?
Shopkeeper: Potrebbe andare meglio. I giovani non mangiano più il pane.
Customer: Sì, tutti credono che mangiare pane faccia ingrassare.
Shopkeeper: Sul serio? Ma gli italiani normalmente non sono grassi.
Marco: Let’s here it slowly now.
Customer: Come va il lavoro?
Shopkeeper: Potrebbe andare meglio. I giovani non mangiano più il pane.
Customer: Sì, tutti credono che mangiare pane faccia ingrassare.
Shopkeeper: Sul serio? Ma gli italiani normalmente non sono grassi.
Marco: And now, with the translation.
Customer: Come va il lavoro?
Customer: How’s work?
Shopkeeper: Potrebbe andare meglio. I giovani non mangiano più il pane.
Shopkeeper: It could be better. Young people don’t eat bread anymore.
Customer: Sì, tutti credono che mangiare pane faccia ingrassare.
Customer: Yes, everyone thinks eating bread makes you fat.
Shopkeeper: Sul serio? Ma gli italiani normalmente non sono grassi.
Shopkeeper: Really, but Italians aren’t usually fat.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: Yes everyone thinks eating bread makes you gain weight.
Cinzia: Oh Marco, I really don’t agree with this.
Marco: Me neither. I mean Italian bread is so good.
Cinzia: Italian bread made me grow up. It’s so good and tasty and healthy too.
Marco: But recently really many young people are starting avoiding bread. Haven’t they?
Cinzia: Yes, especially girls actually.
Marco: Yes for example if somebody is on a diet, he or she will decide to maybe skip bread and just eat some pasta right?
Cinzia: Oh yes, but actually this is not a bad idea. I mean, if you are on diet, you can prefer pasta rather than bread.
Marco: Or on next meal have some bread and some salad or something else.
Cinzia: Yes and actually many people prefer to eat whole wheat bread.
Marco: Pane integrale. But with the prices of bread and also pasta going up, I think more people will start avoiding bread right?
Cinzia: It’s a pity Marco. They should taste our bread because it’s amazing.
Marco: Yes, che peccato.
Cinzia: Yes. But let’s move on and let’s take a look at vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Today’s first word is
Cinzia: Lavoro.
Marco: Work, job.
Cinzia: Lavoro. Lavoro.
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: Giovani.
Marco: Young people, youngsters.
Cinzia: Giovani. Giovani.
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: Più.
Marco: More
Cinzia: Più. Più.
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: Pane.
Marco: Bread.
Cinzia: Pane. Pane.
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: Tutti.
Marco: Everyone.
Cinzia: Tutti. Tutti.
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: Ingrassare.
Marco: To gain weight.
Cinzia: Ingrassare. Ingrassare.
Marco: Next word
Cinzia: Sul serio.
Marco: Really
Cinzia: Sul serio. Sul serio.
Marco: And last word
Cinzia: Normalmente.
Marco: Normally, usually.
Cinzia: Normalmente. Normalmente.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Cinzia: E adesso guardiamo l’uso di alcune parole ed espressioni.
Marco: And now let’s take a look at the usage for some of the words and expressions.
Cinzia: The first word we will look at is lavoro.
Marco: And the first example sentence is actually very, very important. Please listen carefully.
Cinzia: L’Italia è una Repubblica democratica fondata sul lavoro.
Marco: Italy is a democratic, republic based on work. This is very important because it is a starting point for our constitution right?
Cinzia: Yes and I have been studying this so hard when I was preparing my exam at university.
Marco: Please remember this phrase. Next word
Cinzia: Giovani.
Marco: And the example sentence is
Cinzia: I giovani amano divertirsi.
Marco: Young people love having fun.
Cinzia: Next word is pane.
Marco: And the example sentence is
Cinzia: Quanto pane mangi al giorno.
Marco: How much bread do you eat in a day and the next word is
Cinzia: Tutti.
Marco: And the example sentence is
Cinzia: Sono tutti felici.
Marco: Everyone is happy.
Cinzia: The next word we will look at is ingrassare.
Marco: And the example sentence is
Cinzia: Non devo ingrassare.
Marco: I don’t have to gain weight. Yes, I wrote this example sentence so that she could read it.
Cinzia: This guy is so mean.
Marco: Are you speechless?
Cinzia: Yes because I am not fat.
Marco: You are not fat. You just don’t have to get fat. I mean gain weight.
Cinzia: I want
Marco: To eat?
Cinzia: Okay.
Marco: Come on…
Cinzia: Let’s take a look at the next word which is
Marco: The last one actually that is
Cinzia: Normalmente.
Marco: And the example sentence is
Cinzia: Normalmente torno a casa presto.
Marco: I normally go back home early.
Cinzia: And this is you Marco.
Marco: Really?
Cinzia: Yes you go back home very early.
Marco: In the morning, next morning.
Cinzia: Oh okay. Really when?

Lesson focus

Marco: Okay let’s move on to today’s grammar.
Cinzia: Yes.
Marco: The first topic of today’s grammar are opinion verbs which are usually followed by either the infinitive of a verb, past or present, or a sentence called a subordinate clause.
Cinzia: In the case of a subordinate clause, the verb has to be conjugated in the subjunctive mood.
Marco: In the dialogue we had tutti credono che mangiare pane renda grassi. Since credono is conjugated in the present tense, the following rendere verb has to be conjugated in the congiuntivo presente tense, renda.
Cinzia: So you have the present tense of credere which is followed by che and after che, you have the subjunctive mood renda.
Marco: Because the subjunctive in the subordinate clause has to match the tense of the main clause. So present negative, present subjunctive.
Cinzia: It seems pretty complicated but….
Marco: Well this is lower intermediate, isn’t it?
Cinzia: Yes of course. So hang in there.
Marco: And let’s give them one more example. Tutti credono che Cinzia lavori.
Cinzia: Everyone thinks that Cinzia works.
Marco: But she doesn’t.
Cinzia: It’s true Marco. I do work.
Marco: Yes but you have too much fun when you work. That’s the problem.
Cinzia: But this is the key Marco. You have to work but you need to have fun. So if you have fun while working, it’s the best.
Marco: That’s why I am such a boring person. Okay next topic is
Cinzia: We have the verb andare, to go, which can also be used in fixed expressions such as how is work or how is life.
Marco: Yes and how is work can be translated in Italian as
Cinzia: Come va il lavoro?
Marco: And how is life
Cinzia: Come va la vita?
Marco: And how are you doing?
Cinzia: Come va?
Marco: So in all these cases, the verb andare relates to movement only in a metaphor. That’s actually meaning to be.
Cinzia: Yes and be careful because if you want to have the literal translation of how is work, it should be come è il lavoro, but if you ask come è il lavoro it will mean just something different.
Marco: Because in Italian, come è il lavoro means actually do you like your job or what’s your job like.
Cinzia: Yes so be careful and if you want to ask how is it going in Italian, just ask come va and not come è.
Marco: And today’s last topic of the grammar is that when in English, we use the third person singular to refer to people in general, in Italian, we use the third person plural in affirmative sentences. For example
Cinzia: Tutti credono che.
Marco: Everyone thinks that. Instead, Italian negative statements present the same structure as in English. For example, no one believes that is
Cinzia: Nessuno crede che.
Marco: So, nessuno crede che la lezione sia finita.
Cinzia: Oh, io ci credo.
Marco: What does it mean in English?
Cinzia: No one believes that the lesson is finished.
Marco: But I believe so, right?

Outro

Cinzia: Of course. So my dear listeners, sorry but for today, it’s all and see you next time.
Marco: Ciao ciao.
Cinzia: Ciao.

18 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:30 PM
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Heba
Saturday at 09:56 AM
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Hello Ofelia


"Tutti credono che mangiare pane renda grassi"


I understand that in the affirmative mood you use the third person plural (Credono) to refer to people in general, but why you used the third person singular (renda) in the subjective sentence?


I think it should be (rendano) instead of renda. Please elaborate.


Thanking you for your help and support

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 09:25 AM
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Hi Tom,


That is correct. In Italian we translate both "must" and "have to" with "dovere," that's probably why the translator opted for "I don't have to gain weight."


Thank you,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Tom
Thursday at 03:03 PM
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Non devo ingrassare - Would this also translate as "I must not gain weight?"

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 06:09 PM
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Ciao Alicia!


Grazie per il tuo commento.

Ci sono altre lezioni:

https://www.italianpod101.com/2012/10/22/intermediate-17-how-can-you-complain-on-an-italian-holiday-like-this/

https://www.italianpod101.com/2012/11/19/intermediate-21-a-romantic-italian-proposal/

https://www.italianpod101.com/2012/11/26/intermediate-22-commuting-in-italy/


You can always look for a topic or a specific word from the [Search Lessons & Dictionary] field at the top on the right.

Please try to write there [congiuntivo].


Thank you!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Alicia
Thursday at 08:02 AM
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Mi piace molto questa lezione perché mi piace mangiare i pani e lo spaghetti ma e importante non mangiare troppo!

Anche me piace imparare la grammatica.

I like this lesson because I like to eat bread and spaghetti but it is important not too eat too much. Also I like learning the grammar.


Dov' e la lezione del congiuntivo? E piccolo qui. C'e più altrove?


Where is the subjunctive lesson? It is very small here. Is there more somewhere else?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 01:24 AM
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Ciao Harry! Ciao Shirley!


Harry, hai ragione, ho scritto male, scusa!

You are right! I am sorry I made a typo: I wrote "sono" instead of "so". But the comment was corrected already.

It definetively should be:

"Credo di saperne abbastanza"

The subjunctive ("sappia") is not needed, because if someone is talking about his/her feelings, it is supposed that he/she has no doubts about them.


Shirley, "Credo che ne so bene" does not sound natural, but every Italian would understand the meanining!Please correct it with "credo di saperne abbastanza".


Grazie

a presto!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Harry Cain
Tuesday at 08:01 PM
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Non capisco ancora. Se "credo che ne sono bene" vuol dire "I think I know well about it" poi "sono" e' una forma di "sapere" ?? Non dovrebbe "sappia."

Shirley
Tuesday at 01:13 PM
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Ciao Harry e grazie Cinzia e Ofelia.

Si il pronome"ne" è difficili ma Ofelia è gentile. Ha spiegato la problema.

Grazie

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 04:00 PM
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Ciao Harry,


Grazie, la tua domanda è interessante.

Shirley ha usato il pronome "ne", uno dei più difficili!

Shirley has used the pronoun "ne", one of the most difficult!

It means "of/about it".

So she meant to say:

"I like this lesson. I think I know well about it"

"Mi piace queste lezione. Credo che ne so bene."


I hope this can help you!

Thank you

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Harry Cain
Sunday at 11:47 PM
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Non capisco il commento da Shirley. Ha detto: "Mi piace queste lezione. Credo che ne sono bene." Non sarebbe "credo che ne siano bene.?" Ma, gia' allora, non lo capisco. Ha voluto dire, "siano bene per me"?


I don't understand the comment by Shirley. She said, I like these lessons. I think that they are good (or, that I am good with them). Shouldn't it be, I think they they are good (subjunctive). But even then, I don't understand the comment. Did she mean, "they are good for me"?