Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Betsey: Hi everyone! Welcome back to ItalianPod101.com. This is Lower beginner Season 1 Lesson 16 - Have You Been to this Famous Italian Cafe? I’m Betsey.
Ofelia: Ciao! I’m Ofelia.
Betsey: In this lesson you'll learn how to order at a cafe, and how to use ordinal numbers. This conversation takes place at a cafe.
Ofelia: Jack e Claudio parlano insieme.
Betsey: The conversation is between Jack and Claudio. The speakers are friends, so they’ll be using informal language.
Ofelia: Ascoltiamo
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Ofelia: Now I’ll introduce you to an interesting cafe, “il Caffè al Bicerin.”
Betsey: Where is it?
Ofelia: It is a small historical cafe in the city center of Turin, in the Piazza della Consolata.
Betsey: How old is it?
Ofelia: It opened in 1763, so this year it celebrates its 250th anniversary.
Betsey: Wow! It must feel like you’re going back in time when you go into that cafe!
Ofelia: It sure does! il Caffè al Bicerin has an elegant and warm 19th century- atmosphere.
Betsey: The name is also quite interesting. What does it mean? I don’t really understand it.
Ofelia: Well, ‘Bicerin’ is a word in the Piedmont dialect, and comes from bicchierino, which means ‘small glass’. That refers to the glass in which the cafe’s famous drink is served.
Betsey: I see. So what is this famous drink?
Ofelia: The drink is ‘Il Bicerin’, a house specialty made with espresso coffee, chocolate, fresh cream and a secret recipe that mixes these ingredients together into an exquisite hot beverage.
Betsey: It sounds delicious!
Ofelia: It is particularly great in the cold, foggy winter of Turin.
Betsey: Are there other specialties that visitors should not miss when they’re at this cafe?
Ofelia: You can also try other local specialties, like the house hot chocolate, and chestnuts covered in chocolate.
Betsey: Mmmm..
Ofelia: And don’t forget the zabaione! A beverage made with egg yolk, sugar and a sweet wine, like Marsala or Moscato d’Asti.
Betsey: Yum! Before I get too hungry, let’s move onto the vocab.
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Betsey: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary and phrases for this lesson.
Ofelia: The first word is... TEMPO LIBERO
Betsey: FREE TIME
Ofelia: It refers to the time a person is not at work, when they can relax or do a hobby. The possessive adjective is not necessary in Italian.
Betsey: What are some examples?
Ofelia: Nel tempo libero mi piace giocare a calcio.
Betsey: “In my free time I like playing soccer.” Let’s hear that again, Ofelia.
Ofelia: Nel tempo libero mi piace giocare a calcio.
Ofelia: Next up is Nel tempo libero mia sorella guarda la televisione.
Betsey: “In her free time my sister watches TV.” Could you repeat this also?
Ofelia: Nel tempo libero mia sorella guarda la televisione.
Betsey: What's the next expression we'll look at?
Ofelia: …DELLA CASA
Betsey: …of the HOUSE
Ofelia: It often refers to something produced by the specific cafe or restaurant a person is in. It can be il caffè della casa
Betsey: The house coffee.
Ofelia: Or also il vino della casa.
Betsey: “The house wine.” Can you give us a sample sentence?
Ofelia: Volete assaggiare il vino della casa?
Betsey: Do you want to taste the house wine?
Ofelia: Il liquore della casa è abbastanza forte.
Betsey: The house liqueur is quite strong.
Betsey: The last word we'll look at is...
Ofelia: BOMBA
Betsey: BOMB
Ofelia: Here's a sample sentence. Questo caffè è una bomba calorica di cioccolata e panna!
Betsey: This coffee is a calorific bomb of chocolate and cream!
Ofelia: This noun means “bomb”, and like in English, it has a literal meaning, as well as a figurative meaning. As for the latter, it can be used to describe something delicious or something or someone beautiful. It’s a slang term typically used by young people.
Betsey: Let’s hear some examples.
Ofelia: Questo vino è una bomba: ne prendo 12 bottiglie.
Betsey: “This wine is a bomb; I’ll buy 12 bottles.”
Ofelia: Questa lasagna è una bomba. Complimenti!
Betsey: Literally, “This lasagna is a bomb. Congratulations!”
Ofelia: Quella ragazza bionda è una bomba!
Betsey: “That blond girl is a bomb.” Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Ofelia: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use ordinal numbers.
Betsey: These correspond to the English “first”, “second,” “third...”
Ofelia: Exactly. Unlike numbers in English, in Italian ordinal numbers have a distinct form for 1st to 10th .
Betsey: Ok, let’s take a look at those now.
Ofelia: primo
Betsey: first
Ofelia: secondo
Betsey: second
Ofelia: terzo
Betsey: third
Ofelia: quarto
Betsey: fourth
Ofelia: quinto
Betsey: fith
Ofelia: sesto
Betsey: sixth
Ofelia: settimo
Betsey: seventh
Ofelia: ottavo
Betsey: eighth
Ofelia: nono
Betsey: ninth
Ofelia: decimo
Betsey: “tenth.” Now, let’s hear some sample sentences.
Ofelia: Davvero è la tua prima volta in questo cafè?
Betsey: Is it really your first time in this famous café?
Ofelia: Abito al nono piano di quest’edificio.
Betsey: I live on the ninth floor of this building.
Ofelia: After ‘decimo’, meaning “tenth”, ordinal numbers are formed by dropping the final vowel of the cardinal number, and adding the suffix ‘–esimo.’
Betsey: So “eleventh” would be…
Ofelia: undic-esimo
Betsey: I see. That’s easy!
Ofelia: Remember that numbers ending in ’–trè’ and ’-sei’ keep the final vowel.
Betsey: For example, forty-three?
Ofelia: Quarantatrè becomes quarantatreesimo
Betsey: “Forty-three” and “forty-third”
Ofelia: Or settantasei becomes settantaseiesimo
Betsey: “Seventy-six” and “seventy-sixth”
Ofelia: The most important thing to remember, is that unlike cardinal numbers, ordinal numbers agree in gender and number with the nouns they modify.
Betsey: Can you give us an example?
Ofelia: Vado a Napoli per la terza volta quest’anno.
Betsey: I’m going to Naples for the third time this year.
Ofelia: ‘VOLTA’ is feminine therefore the ordinal number, ‘TERZA’, ends in ‘–a’.
Betsey: Do ordinal numbers normally precede the noun?
Ofelia: Yes, always.
Betsey: Can you give us another example…
Ofelia: Non gli piace abitare al ventesimo piano.
Betsey: He doesn’t like living on the 20th floor.
Ofelia: ‘PIANO’ is masculine, so VENTESIMO ends in ‘–o’ the same way that an adjective does.
Betsey: In written language, are Roman numbers used?
Ofelia: They are mainly used when referring to popes, royalty, and centuries.
Betsey: For example…
Ofelia: Il nuovo Papa si chiama Francesco I.
Betsey: The new Pope’s name is Francis the 1st Listeners, remember to check the lesson notes to reinforce what you’ve learned in this lesson.

Outro

Betsey: OK. That's all for this lesson.
Ofelia: Thank you all for listening! A presto!
Betsey: See you next time!

3 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners!

Can you order your favorite coffee in Italian?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 04:21 PM
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Hi Johnny,


In Italian there are different verb moods (ex. indicative, subjunctive, etc.) and verb tenses (ex.present, past, etc.).

io voglio= indicative present "I want"

io vorrei= conditional present "I'd like"

lui/lei veda= imperative present or subjunctive present "may he/she see"

lui/lei vedrà= indicative future, "he/she will see"

io vengo, noi veniamo= indicative present "I come", "we come"

io verrò, noi verremo= indicative future "I will come", "we will come"


I hope this helps!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Johnny
Monday at 02:58 AM
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I am confused over some conjugations of verbs. Please let me know which one is wrong or if they are both acceptable, why and in what situation.

- Volere "to want". I see io voglio and io vorrei.

- Vedere "to see". I see lui/lei veda and lui/lei vedra.

- Venire "to come". I see io vengo and io verro. I also see noi veniamo and noi verremo.


Any clarification would be helpful. Thanks.