Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
None (manual write in):
Jason: Ciao! Welcome back to ItalianPod101.com. I'm Jason.
Cristina: Cristina here!
Jason: This is Intermediate season 1, Lesson 23 – Make Sure you see a Soccer Game in Italy! In this lesson you'll learn about the tense agreement between the main clause and the subordinate clause (conjunctive mood). Such as…
Cristina: Non pensavo ti interessassi di calcio.
Jason: "I didn’t know you were interested in soccer." This conversation takes place at work.
Cristina: Wendy e Simone parlano insieme.
Jason: The conversation is between Wendy and Simone. The speakers are co-workers, so they'll be speaking in informal language.
Cristina: Ascoltiamo
Jason: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Simone: Che leggi? Non pensavo ti interessassi di calcio.
Wendy: Beh, un po’. Ho seguito il campionato italiano di serie A lo scorso anno quando ero negli States. Mi facevo certe notti in bianco pur di guardare le partite.
Simone: Per che squadra tifi?
Wendy: In realtà non ho una squadra del cuore, ma credo che mi sia affezionata alla Roma.
Simone: Io invece sono milanese DOC e tengo all’Inter. Ma sei già stata allo stadio?
Wendy: Purtroppo no. Domenica la Roma viene in trasferta a Torino, ma credo che i biglietti siano già esauriti.
Simone: Possiamo fare un tentativo, ma temo che sia troppo tardi. Se non sbaglio però la Roma giocherà qui a San Siro tra 5 settimane. Perchè non ci andiamo insieme?
Wendy: Fantastico!
Simone: Cerco i biglietti per il secondo anello nella sezione arancione, va bene?
Wendy: Se non ti dispiace preferirei che andassimo nel primo anello, anche se i biglietti saranno più salati.
Simone: Non c’è problema. Anch’io vado allo stadio saltuariamente e tanto vale approfittare dell’occasione. Cerco subito i biglietti su internet altrimenti li prendiamo al botteghino allo stadio.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Simone: Che leggi? Non pensavo ti interessassi di calcio.
Wendy: Beh, un po’. Ho seguito il campionato italiano di serie A lo scorso anno quando ero negli States. Mi facevo certe notti in bianco pur di guardare le partite.
Simone: Per che squadra tifi?
Wendy: In realtà non ho una squadra del cuore, ma credo che mi sia affezionata alla Roma.
Simone: Io invece sono milanese DOC e tengo all’Inter. Ma sei già stata allo stadio?
Wendy: Purtroppo no. Domenica la Roma viene in trasferta a Torino, ma credo che i biglietti siano già esauriti.
Simone: Possiamo fare un tentativo, ma temo che sia troppo tardi. Se non sbaglio però la Roma giocherà qui a San Siro tra 5 settimane. Perchè non ci andiamo insieme?
Wendy: Fantastico!
Simone: Cerco i biglietti per il secondo anello nella sezione arancione, va bene?
Wendy: Se non ti dispiace preferirei che andassimo nel primo anello, anche se i biglietti saranno più salati.
Simone: Non c’è problema. Anch’io vado allo stadio saltuariamente e tanto vale approfittare dell’occasione. Cerco subito i biglietti su internet altrimenti li prendiamo al botteghino allo stadio.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Simone: Che leggi? Non pensavo ti interessassi di calcio.
Jason: What are you reading? I didn't know you were interested in soccer.
Wendy: Beh, un po’. Ho seguito il campionato italiano di serie A lo scorso anno quando ero negli States. Mi facevo certe notti in bianco pur di guardare le partite.
Jason: Well, I am a little. I followed the Italian Serie A championship last year while I was in the States. I had some sleepless nights watching the games.
Simone: Per che squadra tifi?
Jason: Which team are you a fan of?
Wendy: In realtà non ho una squadra del cuore, ma credo che mi sia affezionata alla Roma.
Jason: Actually, I don't have a favorite team, but I think I've come to like Roma the best. And you?
Simone: Io invece sono milanese DOC e tengo all’Inter. Ma sei già stata allo stadio?
Jason: I'm from Milan, and I support Inter Milan. Have you been to the stadium yet?
Wendy: Purtroppo no. Domenica la Roma viene in trasferta a Torino, ma credo che i biglietti siano già esauriti.
Jason: Unfortunately not. On Sunday Roma plays away in Turin, but I think the tickets are already sold out.
Simone: Possiamo fare un tentativo, ma temo che sia troppo tardi. Se non sbaglio però la Roma giocherà qui a San Siro tra 5 settimane. Perchè non ci andiamo insieme?
Jason: We could give it a try, but I'm afraid it might be too late. If I'm not wrong, though, Roma will play here in San Siro in five weeks. Why don't we go together?
Wendy: Fantastico!
Jason: Great!
Simone: Cerco i biglietti per il secondo anello nella sezione arancione, va bene?
Jason: I'm going to look for the tickets in the second ring of the orange section of the stadium; is that okay?
Wendy: Se non ti dispiace preferirei che andassimo nel primo anello, anche se i biglietti saranno più salati.
Jason: If you don't mind, I would rather go to the first ring, even if the tickets will be more expensive.
Simone: Non c’è problema. Anch’io vado allo stadio saltuariamente e tanto vale approfittare dell’occasione. Cerco subito i biglietti su internet altrimenti li prendiamo al botteghino allo stadio.
Jason: No problem. I also go occasionally to the stadium, so it's worth taking advantage of this opportunity. I'm going to look for the tickets online; otherwise, we can buy them at the stadium kiosk.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Cristina: In this lesson, we’ll talk about calcio!
Jason: Soccer, Italy’s national sport.
Cristina: Esatto. Kids start to play soccer when they're very young and every town has its own campo di calcio ("soccer pitch").
Jason: I also heard that most Italians have their favorite team whether they go to the stadium every Sunday or occasionally watch a match on TV.
Cristina: Yes. So when travelling to Italy, whether you are a big fan of soccer or not, I would advise you to go to the stadium to watch a game.
Jason: Even if you don’t know much about the teams playing?
Cristina: Yes, I think it’s a thrilling experience anyway.
Jason: When is the best time to see a match?
Cristina: Calcio is played almost all year around but there are no games in June and July and seldom games in August.
Jason: And how do I get tickets, let’s say for a game of Serie A?
Cristina: You can either go to the stadium in advance or go to the team’s club outlets in the city.
Jason: Can I buy the tickets at the stadium on the day of the match?
Cristina: You can, but it might be difficult to get any.
Jason: I see. How about online?
Cristina: Sure. You can buy your ticket online on websites like TicketOne or ListTicket, although prices are sometimes higher than at the stadium kiosk.
Jason: Ok, keep that in mind, listeners.
Cristina: And don’t forget to bring your I.D. because your name must be printed on the ticket.
VOCAB LIST
Jason: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Cristina: campionato [natural native speed]
Jason: championship
Cristina: campionato [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: campionato [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristina: notte in bianco [natural native speed]
Jason: sleepless night
Cristina: notte in bianco [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: notte in bianco [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristina: tifare [natural native speed]
Jason: to be a fan
Cristina: tifare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: tifare [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristina: squadra del cuore [natural native speed]
Jason: favorite team
Cristina: squadra del cuore [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: squadra del cuore [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristina: doc [natural native speed]
Jason: authentic
Cristina: doc [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: doc [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristina: in trasferta [natural native speed]
Jason: away
Cristina: in trasferta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: in trasferta [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristina: esaurito [natural native speed]
Jason: sold out, finished
Cristina: esaurito [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: esaurito [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristina: anello [natural native speed]
Jason: ring
Cristina: anello [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: anello [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristina: saltuariamente [natural native speed]
Jason: occasionally
Cristina: saltuariamente [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: saltuariamente [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristina: botteghino [natural native speed]
Jason: kiosk
Cristina: botteghino [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: botteghino [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Jason: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Jason: Let's take a closer look at the words and phrases from this lesson. The first one we'll look at is...
Cristina: TIFARE
Jason: TO BE A FAN
Cristina: Here's a sample sentence. Mio cugino tifa per l’Udinese da quando era piccolo.
Jason: "My cousin has been a fan of Udinese since he was young."
Cristina: The verb tifare ("to be a fan of" or "to cheer for") is always followed by the preposition per.
Jason: Are there other ways to express the same meaning?
Cristina: Yes,there are many – fare il tifo per, tenere a or essere un fan di.
Jason: Any example?
Cristina: Facciamo il tifo per la squadra di Sara stasera!
Jason: "Let’s cheer for Sara’s team tonight!"
Cristina: Another example is Sono un fan di Bocelli.
Jason: "I’m a fan of Bocelli."
Jason: What's the next one we'll look at?
Cristina: ESAURITO
Jason: SOLD OUT, FINISHED, FULL
Cristina: Here’s a sample sentence – La sua commedia fa il tutto esaurito ogni sera.
Jason: "There is a full house every night for his play."
Cristina: Esaurito has two meanings. First, it is a synonymous of finito (from finire) and it is often translated as "off" or "sold out" or "finished." It can refer to tickets or copies of a book or products.
Jason: An example?
Cristina: La prima edizione di questo libro è già esaurita.
Jason: "The first edition of this book is already sold out."
Cristina: Second, when referred to people, esaurito carries the meaning of "exhausted, worn-out."
Jason: For instance?
Cristina: Il Signor Bianchi è esaurito per il troppo lavoro.
Jason: "Mr. Bianchi is exhausted because of too much work."
Cristina: Esatto!

Lesson focus

Cristina: In this lesson, we’ll focus on the tense agreement between a main and a subordinate clause of the conjunctive mood or modo congiuntivo.
Jason: Let’s first review how many are the tenses in the congiuntivo.
Cristina: There are four tenses, presente, imperfetto, passato, trapassato. Jason
Cristina: Some verbs that express a personal opinion are credere, pensare, è importante, è necessario. They usually require the congiuntivo in the subordinate clause.
Jason: For example…
Cristina: Credevo che stessi dormendo.
Jason: "I thought you were sleeping."
Jason: Let’s now consider what the tense agreement is when the verb of the main clause is in the present, future or imperative tense of the indicative mood…
Cristina: The passato of the conjunctive mood is used in the subordinate clause
to express an action that happened before the one of the main clause.
Jason: For example?
Cristina: Penso che Giovanni sia già uscito da 10 minuti.
Jason: "I think that Giovanni already left about 10 minutes ago."
Cristina: Here is one more example, Credo che i biglietti siano già esauriti.
Jason: "I believe that the tickets are already sold out."
Jason: What if I want to describe two actions that happen at the same time?
Cristina: The verb is in the present tense both in the main and the subordinate clause.
Jason: Can you give me a sample sentence?
Cristina: Penso che Giovanni stia uscendo ora.
Jason: "I think Giovanni is going out now."
Cristina: Now we’ll focus on how the tense agreement works when the verb of the main clause is in the past tense of the indicative mood.
Jason: So when the verb of the main clause is in the past tense…
Cristina: The trapassato is used in the subordinate clause to express an action that happened before the one of the main clause.
Jason: For example?
Cristina: Pensavo che Sara avesse cucinato la pasta,ma in realtà non ha fatto niente.
Jason: "I thought that Sara had cooked pasta but she actually didn’t prepare anything."
Cristina: If I want to describe two actions that happen at the same time the verb is in the imperfetto in the subordinate clause.
Jason: Can you give me a sample sentence?
Cristina: Non pensavo ti interessassi di calcio.
Jason: "I didn’t know you were interested in soccer."
Cristina: If in the main sentence there are verbs like preferire or volere in the conditional present tense, the verb in the subordinate clause is in the congiuntivo imperfetto to express contemporaneity
Jason: Can you give us a sample sentence?
Cristina: Se non ti dispiace preferirei che andassimo nel primo anello.
Jason: "If you don’t mind I would rather go to the first ring."
Cristina: The verb in the subordinate clause is in the congiuntivo trapassato to express anteriority.
Jason: For example…
Cristina: Vorrei che l’inverno fosse già finito.
Jason: "I wish winter was already gone."

Outro

Jason: OK. That's all for this lesson. In the lesson notes, you can find more examples on this grammar point. So be sure to read them.
Cristina: A presto!
Jason: Bye-bye!

3 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 05:58 AM
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Hi Michael,

The Subjunctive mood is sometimes referred to as the Conjunctive mood, according to Wikipedia. While it is not widely used, I believe Italian natives tend to say "conjunctive" because it's so similar to "congiuntivo".

For example, I also have to constantly remind myself to say "Subjunctive" 😅


Congiuntivo = Subjunctive/Conjunctive


Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

Michael
Saturday at 06:51 AM
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Sara Intermediate lesson 23 says "Conjunctive mood." There is no conjunctive mood is there?