Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
None (manual write in):
Jason: Ciao! Jason here.
Cristina: Cristina here! Welcome to ItalianPod101.com's Intermediate series. This is Lesson 12 - Be Careful in Italian Traffic!
Jason: In this lesson you'll learn how to use the gerundio presente. Such as…
Cristina: Camminando per il reparto, ho incontrato un mio vecchio compagno di classe.
Jason: "While walking in the ward, I met an old classmate of mine." This conversation takes place at work.
Cristina: James e Giovanna parlano insieme.
Jason: The conversation is between James and Giovanna. The speakers are co-workers, so they'll be speaking informal language.
Cristina: Ascoltiamo
Jason: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
James: Giovanna, che ti è successo? Perchè porti.. come si chiama?
Giovanna: Il collare ortopedico. Ho avuto un incidente stradale ieri mentre tornavo dal lavoro.
James: Mi dispiace. Com’è avvenuto?
Giovanna: Ero in macchina ferma in mezzo alla strada. Stavo girando a sinistra in una piazzetta quando un veicolo ha tamponato la mia macchina.
James: Avevi messo la freccia?
Giovanna: Certo! Il conducente ha detto che si è distratto e non ha visto la freccia. Io sono scesa subito dalla macchina e vedendo il danno alla mia macchina, mi sono quasi messa a piangere. Poi abbiamo chiamato i carabinieri e firmato la constatazione amichevole. Ora ho appena telefonato all’assicurazione.
James: Sei stata all’ospedale ieri sera?
Giovanna: Sì, al pronto soccorso. Ho fatto una radiografia e non ho nulla di rotto, solo delle botte. Camminando per il reparto, ho incontrato un mio vecchio compagno di classe, che ora è infermiere. Per tirarmi su, mi ha pagato la cena.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
James: Giovanna, che ti è successo? Perchè porti.. come si chiama?
Giovanna: Il collare ortopedico. Ho avuto un incidente stradale ieri mentre tornavo dal lavoro.
James: Mi dispiace. Com’è avvenuto?
Giovanna: Ero in macchina ferma in mezzo alla strada. Stavo girando a sinistra in una piazzetta quando un veicolo ha tamponato la mia macchina.
James: Avevi messo la freccia?
Giovanna: Certo! Il conducente ha detto che si è distratto e non ha visto la freccia. Io sono scesa subito dalla macchina e vedendo il danno alla mia macchina, mi sono quasi messa a piangere. Poi abbiamo chiamato i carabinieri e firmato la constatazione amichevole. Ora ho appena telefonato all’assicurazione.
James: Sei stata all’ospedale ieri sera?
Giovanna: Sì, al pronto soccorso. Ho fatto una radiografia e non ho nulla di rotto, solo delle botte. Camminando per il reparto, ho incontrato un mio vecchio compagno di classe, che ora è infermiere. Per tirarmi su, mi ha pagato la cena.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
James: Giovanna, che ti è successo? Perchè porti.. come si chiama?
Jason: Giovanna, what happened? Why are you wearing a...what's that called?
Giovanna: Il collare ortopedico. Ho avuto un incidente stradale ieri mentre tornavo dal lavoro.
Jason: A neck brace. I had a road accident yesterday while going home from work.
James: Mi dispiace. Com’è avvenuto?
Jason: I'm sorry to hear that. How did it happen?
Giovanna: Ero in macchina ferma in mezzo alla strada. Stavo girando a sinistra in una piazzetta quando un veicolo ha tamponato la mia macchina.
Jason: I was in my car in the middle of the road. I was about to turn left into a little square when a vehicle ran into my car.
James: Avevi messo la freccia?
Jason: Did you use your blinker?
Giovanna: Certo! Il conducente ha detto che si è distratto e non ha visto la freccia. Io sono scesa subito dalla macchina e vedendo il danno alla mia macchina, mi sono quasi messa a piangere. Poi abbiamo chiamato i carabinieri e firmato la constatazione amichevole. Ora ho appena telefonato all’assicurazione.
Jason: Sure! The driver said that he got distracted and didn't notice the blinker. I got out of the car immediately, and when I saw the damage to my car, I almost cried. Then we called the police and signed the accident report. I just called the insurance company now.
James: Sei stata all’ospedale ieri sera?
Jason: Did you go to the hospital last night?
Giovanna: Sì, al pronto soccorso. Ho fatto una radiografia e non ho nulla di rotto, solo delle botte. Camminando per il reparto, ho incontrato un mio vecchio compagno di classe, che ora è infermiere. Per tirarmi su, mi ha pagato la cena.
Jason: Yes, to the emergency ward. I did an X-ray and nothing is broken; I just have some bruises. While walking in the ward, I met an old classmate of mine, who is now a nurse. To cheer me up, he paid for my dinner.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Cristina: Today I’d like to introduce to you the Italian FORZE DELL’ORDINE.
Jason: The Italian police, right?
Cristina: Esatto. There are different groups but in this lesson, let’s focus on those that you are more likely meet when travelling in Italy.
Jason: Well, last time I was in Italy I got stopped by a policeman. I think I was going over the speed limit.
Cristina: Was he dressed in black?
Jason: No, he was wearing a white helmet and had a whistle.
Cristina: That’s called VIGILE URBANO and are responsible for supervising the road traffic in a city or town.
Jason: Ah. So who are the ones dressed in black?
Cristina: They are CARABINIERI. Their uniform is all black and has red stripes on the sides. They also serve as military police.
Jason: I think I saw an Italian TV series called Il Maresciallo Rocca. He was a carabiniere, I think.
Cristina: Esatto! They have many different duties, from patrolling streets to conducting house searches or criminal investigations.
Jason: I see.
Cristina: One last group is POLIZIA DI STATO.
Jason: "The civil national police."
Cristina: Sì. along with patrolling, investigative and law enforcement duties, it patrols the autostrada,"Italy's Express Highway".
Jason: Do they carry a gun?
Cristina: Yes, just like the Carabinieri.
VOCAB LIST
Jason: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Cristina: collare [natural native speed]
Jason: neck brace, collar
Cristina: collare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: collare [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristina: ortopedico [natural native speed]
Jason: orthopedic
Cristina: ortopedico [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: ortopedico [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristina: mettere la freccia [natural native speed]
Jason: to indicate, to signal
Cristina: mettere la freccia [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: mettere la freccia [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristina: conducente [natural native speed]
Jason: driver
Cristina: conducente [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: conducente [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristina: danno [natural native speed]
Jason: damage
Cristina: danno [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: danno [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristina: carabiniere [natural native speed]
Jason: police
Cristina: carabiniere [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: carabiniere [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristina: costatazione amichevole [natural native speed]
Jason: accident report
Cristina: costatazione amichevole [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: costatazione amichevole [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristina: assicurazione [natural native speed]
Jason: insurance company
Cristina: assicurazione [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: assicurazione [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristina: radiografia [natural native speed]
Jason: x-ray
Cristina: radiografia [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: radiografia [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cristina: tirarsi su [natural native speed]
Jason: to cheer up
Cristina: tirarsi su [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cristina: tirarsi su [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Jason: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Jason: Let's take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first one we'll look at is...
Cristina: COLLARE
Jason: "NECK BRACE", in this conversation.
Cristina: Here's a sample sentence. Dopo l’incidente ho dovuto portare un collare ortopedico per 10 giorni.
Jason: "After the accident I had to wear a neck brace for 10 days."
Cristina: In general the word collare means "collar" and both the Italian and English words come from collo, "neck".
Jason: A collare is usually used for pets.
Cristina: From the word collo the word collana is formed.
Jason: Collana means "necklace".
Cristina: There is another word, Collarino. It refers to decorative neckbands, often used in gothic or punk styles.
Jason: What's the next one we'll look at?
Cristina: TIRARSI SU.
Jason: TO CHEER UP.
Cristina: Here's a sample sentence. Per tirarmi su, un mio amico mi ha pagato la cena.
Jason: "To cheer me up a friend of mine paid for my dinner."
Cristina: Besides the meaning of ‘cheer up’ this verbal expression has different meanings according to the context.
Jason: It can simply mean "to rise" or "to get up."
Cristina: A similar word in Italian in alzarsi. For example, La mattina è difficile tirarsi su dal letto.
Jason: "In the morning it is difficult to get up from the bed."
Cristina: Esatto. Another meaning is similar to sedersi dritto.
Jason: "to sit upright."
Cristina: Marco, quando sei a tavola, tirati su e mangia bene.
Jason: "Marco, when you are at the table, sit upright and eat with manners."
Cristina: Tirarsi su i capelli is like raccogliersi i capelli.
Jason: "to pin up" or "put hair up."
Cristina: Stai meglio quando ti tiri su i capelli.
Jason: "You look better when you pin up your hair."

Lesson focus

Jason: The focus of this lesson is the usage of gerundio presente.
Cristina: It is the equivalent of the –ing verb form in English.
Jason: Let’s review the formation of the gerundio. Add the suffix –ando to the stem of –are verbs
Cristina: So cantare becomes cantando.
Jason: and add the suffix -endo to the stem of the –ere and –ire verbs.
Cristina: Correre becomes correndo and dormire becomes dormendo.
Jason: Some verbs can have an irregular form. For example…
Cristina: condurre has the gerundio as conducendo or porre becomes ponendo.
Jason: Let’s now look at different uses of the gerundio.
Cristina: Together with the verb stare the gerundio is used to create the present continuous.
Jason: For example…
Cristina: Ora non posso venire. Sto lavorando
Jason: "Now I cannot come. I’m working."
Cristina: It can also create the past continuous.
Jason: Can you give us an example?
Cristina: Sure. Stavo facendo la spesa quando mi ha telefonato Maria.
Jason: "I was doing my shopping when Maria called me."
Cristina: The gerundio presente is also used to suggest a cause or a reason behind an event.
Jason: For example…
Cristina: Conoscendo le tue idee non ho detto niente.
Jason: "Since I knew your ideas, I didn’t say anything."
Cristina: It is possible to use perchè or poichè or siccome to replace the secondary sentence of the gerundio.
Jason: What do you mean?
Cristina: The sentence before can be also expressed as Poichè conosco le tue idee non ho detto niente.
Jason: I see. In English, ‘since’ or ‘because’ are common translations.
Cristina: We can use the gerundio presente also to show that two actions are performed at the same time.
Jason: Can you give us a sample sentence?
Cristina: Camminando per il reparto, ho incontrato un mio vecchio compagno di classe.
Jason: "While walking in the ward, I met an old classmate of mine."
Cristina: Another example is Ceno guardando la televisione.
Jason: "I have dinner while watching TV."
Cristina: How would you translate the gerundio presente in English?
Jason: I think it’s best to use ‘while’ plus "–ing" form.
Cristina: In Italian to convey the meaning of contemporaneity, the gerundio presente can be substituted by mentre+ sentence
Jason: So the sentence "I have dinner while watching TV" in Italian can be …
Cristina: Ceno guardando la televisione or Ceno mentre guardo la televisione.

Outro

Jason: OK. That's all for this lesson. In the lesson notes, you can find more examples on this grammar point. So be sure to read them.
Cristina: A presto!
Jason: Bye-bye!

13 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:11 AM
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Hi Antonette,


Thank you for studying with us! ?

Grazie e buono studio!


Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Antonette
Friday at 11:12 PM
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Thank you. This is so helpful. It has helped me to understand how to use this phrase in every way. Tiramisu is a popular dessert in the US too, which will make the phrase fun to use.


By the way, the comment section is so useful.I use it a lot, and it ialways helps me to understand nuances in the lesson so much better. Thank you again.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 05:04 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Antonette,


Right, in the dialogue it is used in the infinitive form.

"To cheer us up" is "per tirarci su".


The dictionary form is "tirare". When you add the pronoun to it, you have to drop the final -e.


I hope this helps! Keep up the great work! ?


Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Antonette
Thursday at 09:55 PM
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That's helpful. So in the dialogue, it is not conjugated because it is used in the infinitive, correct?


So how would you translate the sentence "Per tirarmi su, mi ha pagato la cena." If you wanted to say "To cheer us up...?"

Would the infinitive still be used?


Thank you again for all your help. It is really useful

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 04:25 PM
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Hi Antonette,


You should put the pronoun before the verb.

Mi tiro su, ti tiri su, si tira su,...


"She cheers us up" is "ci tira su."

Notice "tiraci su!" is the imperative and means, "Cheer us up!"


Grazie e a presto,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Antonette
Tuesday at 12:12 PM
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I'm trying to figure out the conjugation of tirarme su.


Would " I sit upright " be "tirome su?"


Would "she cheers us up" be "tirachi su?"

Grazie.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 10:11 AM
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Ciao Jamilet,


Thank you for the suggestion! It will surely help all the other listeners!


Grazie mille!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Jamilet Couret-Bryant
Tuesday at 10:24 PM
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"When a vehicle rear-ended my car" is a more precise translation for "quando un veicolo ha tamponato la mia macchina"

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 12:37 AM
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Hi Alex,


Il verbo "fermare" ha un participio passato regolare,

Ferm-are -> Ferm-ato

while "fermo" is a simple adjective, even though in the past it was also used as the past participle of "fermare".

Thank you for asking again!


Ciao!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

alex
Tuesday at 02:27 PM
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Il verbo fermare ha irregolare formi del participio passato?

L'ho trovato solo questi: 'fermato' e 'fermata'