Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

Let's take a closer look at the conversation.
Do you remember how Mark asks,
"Are you a student?"
È studente?
First is è, “[you] are” when using formal Italian. È. È.
Note: è is a shortened form of lei è, “you are.” In Italian, lei, “you,” when using formal Italian, can be omitted when it is understood from context.
È is from the verb essere, meaning "to be." Essere.
Next is studente, "student." Studente. Studente.
In Italian, all nouns have grammatical gender and are either singular or plural. Studente is masculine singular.
All together, È studente?
Are you a student?
È studente?
Now, let's take a closer look at the response.
Do you remember how Paolo says,
"No, I'm not a student. I'm an investor."
No, non sono studente. Sono investitore.
First is the expression, no, meaning, "no." No. No.
It answers Mark's yes-or-no question, "Are you a student?" È studente?
After this, Paolo specifies that he’s not a student. Non sono studente. "I'm not a student." Non sono studente.
First is non, "not." Non. Non.
Next is sono. "[I] am." Sono. Sono.
Note: here sono is a shortened form of io sono, “I am.” In Italian, io, I, is usually omitted, as it’s understood from context.
Sono is from the verb essere, meaning "to be." essere.
Together, it's non sono, literally "Not I am," but it translates as "I'm not." Non sono.
Next is Studente. "Student." Studente.
All together, Non sono studente. "I'm not a student." Non sono studente.
Paolo then tells Mark his actual occupation. Sono investitore. "I'm an investor." Sono investitore.
First, sono "[I] am." Sono.
Next is investitore, "investor." Investitore. Investitore.
The word investitore is masculine singular.
Together, Sono investitore. "I'm an investor." Sono investitore.
All together, No, non sono studente. Sono investitore.
"No, I'm not a student. I'm an investor."
No, non sono studente. Sono investitore.
The pattern is
No, non sono {occupation}. Sono {actual occupation}.
"No, I'm not {occupation}. I'm {actual occupation}."
No, non sono {occupation}. Sono {actual occupation}.
Imagine you’re Emma Esposito, a student. The word for a female student is studentessa.
Studentessa. Studentessa.
Paolo Parisi asks you if you’re a teacher, insegnante.
Insegnante. Insegnante.
Say
"No, I'm not a teacher. I'm a student."
Ready?
No, non sono insegnante. Sono studentessa.
"No, I'm not a teacher. I'm a student."
No, non sono insegnante. Sono studentessa.
In Italian, some occupations have the same word for both genders.
For example, insegnante.
Insegnante,
insegnante.
However, much of the time, words will differ depending on gender.
In general, nouns that end in -o tend to be masculine, while nouns that end in -a tend to be feminine.

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Can you talk about your occupation using the pattern introduced in this lesson?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 11:19 PM
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Hi Marie,

perfect! Thanks for leaving a comment, let us know if you have any questions.


Team ItalianPod101.com

Marie
Sunday at 05:20 PM
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Sono insegnante. Io non sono studentessa.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 12:17 AM
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Hi Jade,

thanks for your question.


"Lei" can be both "she" or the formal way to say "you". In this case, it is used both for males and females.

Example:

Tu come stai? = How are you? (informal)

Lei come sta? = How is she? (talking about someone else) / How are you? (formal)


I hope this helps!


Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

Jade
Wednesday at 06:14 AM
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I was under the impression lei was used to say “she” and both passengers are male. Why do we use lei in this situation instead of tu?