Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to ItalianPod101.com. This is Business Italian for Beginners Season 1, Lesson 8 - Leaving Your Italian Office At the End of the Day. I’m Eric.
Ofelia: Ciao, I'm Ofelia.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn what to say when you leave the office after work. The conversation takes place at an office.
Ofelia: It's between Linda and Carlo.
Eric: The speakers are co-workers, so they will use informal Italian. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Linda: Per oggi ho finito. Carlo, tu hai ancora molto da fare?
Carlo: Sì, ...forse ancora mezz'oretta.
Linda: Ho capito, allora ci vediamo domani.
Carlo: A domani! Ciao!
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Linda: Per oggi ho finito. Carlo, tu hai ancora molto da fare?
Carlo: Sì, ...forse ancora mezz'oretta.
Linda: Ho capito, allora ci vediamo domani.
Carlo: A domani! Ciao!
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
Linda: I'm done for today. Carlo, do you still have much to do?
Carlo: Yes ... maybe about another half an hour.
Linda: OK, so I'll see you tomorrow.
Carlo: See you tomorrow! Bye!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Ofelia, do Italians like working overtime?
Ofelia: It obviously depends on the person and on the situation, but in general Italians don't overwork. They greatly value their free time and the time they spend with their family.
Eric: It’s common sense that a good job is a job that doesn't force workers to work overtime and allows them to find the right balance between work life and private life.
Ofelia: Right, on the other hand this doesn't mean that bad working conditions don't exist in Italy, but be ready to meet business partners who, for the reasons we just gave, don't really like to be contacted during their time off.
Eric: What’s the Italian for “to overwork”?
Ofelia: Fare lo straordinario
Eric: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Ofelia: finire [natural native speed]
Eric: to finish, to end, to stop
Ofelia: finire[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ofelia: finire [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Ofelia: avere da fare [natural native speed]
Eric: to have something to do, to be busy
Ofelia: avere da fare[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ofelia: avere da fare [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Ofelia: forse [natural native speed]
Eric: maybe
Ofelia: forse [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ofelia: forse [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Ofelia: mezz'oretta [natural native speed]
Eric: about half an hour
Ofelia: mezz'oretta[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ofelia: mezz'oretta [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Ofelia: ci vediamo [natural native speed]
Eric: see you!
Ofelia: ci vediamo[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ofelia: ci vediamo [natural native speed]
Eric: And last..
Ofelia: A domani! [natural native speed]
Eric: See you tomorrow!
Ofelia: A domani![slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ofelia: A domani! [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Ofelia: Avere da fare
Eric: meaning "to have something to do,” or “to be busy". Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Ofelia: Sure. For example, you can say.. Ho troppe cose da fare.
Eric: ..which means "I have too many things to do."
Ofelia: The phrase avere da fare is made up of two parts, the verb avere, meaning "to have," and the phrase da fare, meaning "[something] that needs to be done." When da is followed by an infinitive, you get a fully meaningful phrase...
Eric: ...which means "[something] that needs to be done" and which can be used as an adjective or a noun.
Ofelia: another example is da leggere
Eric: Which means "that needs to be read,"
Ofelia: or da provare
Eric: Which means "that needs to be tried." Okay, what's the next phrase?
Ofelia: mezz'oretta
Eric: Meaning "about half an hour"
Ofelia: This phrase is made up of two words – mezza meaning "half," and oretta, which literally means "little hour." Oretta is the diminutive of the noun ora meaning "hour." You get this specific form by adding the diminutive suffix -etta to the stem.
Eric: It is used to talk about a rough estimate of time, usually below the real duration, being a diminutive. Can you give us an example using the whole phrase?
Ofelia: Sure. For example, you can say.. Ho fatto mezz'oretta di pausa.
Eric: .. which means "I took a break of about half an hour. " Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn what to say when you leave the office after work. Even though in some cases you don’t need to say anything at all when you leave the office for a moment, it’s usually better to say goodbye properly when leaving when you finish your shift.
Ofelia: In most cases, it will be enough to say just Ciao, but if, like in the dialogue, you see that your co-workers still seem to be in the middle of their work, you could use expressions similar to the ones that Linda used in the dialogue. Those were Per oggi ho finito. Carlo, tu hai ancora molto da fare?
Eric: Which means “I'm done for today. Carlo, do you still have much to do?” Let’s break it down.
Ofelia: First Linda states that she is done for the day, Per oggi ho finito. The preposition per in this case, like its English translation “for,” is used to define a period of time.
Eric: Can you use it with other expressions?
Ofelia: Yes, for example per questa settimana
Eric: Meaning “for this week”
Ofelia: Or per quest’anno
Eric: Which means “for this year”
Ofelia: Getting back to the dialogue, next we find the past ho finito, meaning “I finished.”
Eric: Then Linda asks...
Ofelia: Tu hai ancora molto da fare?
Eric: Which means “Do you still have much to do?”
Ofelia: Notice that here, ancora is used with the meaning of “still” and not “once more.”
Eric: It’s best to use these expressions if you see that the other person seems very busy.
Ofelia: Once you are sure that your colleague doesn’t need help, you can say: Ho capito, allora ci vediamo domani.
Eric: Which means “OK, so I'll see you tomorrow.” Let’s break it down.
Ofelia: Ho capito, which literally means “I understood,” can be very useful when giving a generic answer.
Eric: It’s something very similar to the English “OK” or “I see.”
Ofelia: Allora ci vediamo domani means “so, I’ll see you tomorrow.” Ci vediamo domani can be used by itself, as the greeting expressions A domani!, “See you tomorrow!,” or Ciao!
Eric: Ok, let’s wrap up with a couple more sample sentences.
Ofelia: For example, Io ho finito. Voi avete ancora molto da fare?
Eric: "I'm done. Do you still have much to do?"
Ofelia: Ho capito, allora ci vediamo lunedì!
Eric: "OK, I'll see you on Monday!"

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time!
Ofelia: A presto!

3 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Let's practice together in the comments!

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 06:04 AM
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Hi George Boccanfuso,

if you mean the intro, maybe you could just skip it? We get lots of positive comments about the music, but of course, everyone's tastes are different.😉


Team ItalianPod101.com

George Boccanfuso
Sunday at 06:38 AM
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Change the music. Please!