Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Cinzia: Hello everyone! I'm Cinzia, and welcome to ItalianPOD101.
Marco: With us, you'll learn to speak Italian with fun and effective lessons.
Cinzia: We also provide you with cultural insights
Marco: and tips you won't find in a textbook...
Marco: In this lesson we will learn about the condizionale passato (past conditional) in type III if-clauses.
Cinzia: This conversation takes place on the streets of Italy
Marco: And it is between Luca and Elena
Cinzia: They are friends, therefore they will be speaking informal Italian
Marco: Now, if you're listening on an iPod...
Cinzia: or an iTouch or iPhone...
Marco: click the center button of the iPod or tap the screen on an iTouch or iPhone, to see the notes for this lesson while you listen!
Cinzia: Read along, while you listen.
Marco: This technique will help you remember faster! Okay...
Marco: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Luca: Che ore sono?
Elena: È mezzogiorno e venti.
Luca: Se non fosse andata in bagno saremmo arrivati in tempo.
Elena: Non è stato per colpa della sosta, ma dell’incidente che ha rallentato il traffico.
Luca: Sì hai ragione, scusami.
Elena: Ora entriamo.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Luca: Che ore sono?
Elena: È mezzogiorno e venti.
Luca: Se non fosse andata in bagno saremmo arrivati in tempo.
Elena: Non è stato per colpa della sosta, ma dell’incidente che ha rallentato il traffico.
Luca: Sì hai ragione, scusami.
Elena: Ora entriamo.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Luca: Che ore sono?
Marco: What time is it?
Elena: È mezzogiorno e venti.
Marco: It’s twenty past noon.
Luca: Se non fosse andata in bagno saremmo arrivati in tempo.
Marco: If she hadn’t gone to the bathroom, we would have arrived on time.
Elena: Non è stato per colpa della sosta, ma dell’incidente che ha rallentato il traffico.
Marco: It wasn’t because of the stopover, but the accident that slowed down the traffic.
Luca: Sì hai ragione, scusami.
Marco: Yes, you are right, sorry.
Elena: Ora entriamo.
Marco: Let’s go in now.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Cinzia: Have you ever been in a road accident?
Marco: Actually I have, twice.
Cinzia: Really, what happened.
Marco: The first time I was in a car and we got bumped in the rear while stopping at a traffic light.
Cinzia: So just a slight bump, nothing serious?
Marco: Exactly.
Cinzia: And the second time?
Marco: While riding my motorbike I slid on a very slippery road, but I stopped after a few meters and no injury, thankfully. What about you?
Cinzia: …
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Cinzia: mezzogiorno [natural native speed]
Marco: noon, midday
Cinzia: mezzogiorno [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: mezzogiorno [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cinzia: colpa [natural native speed]
Marco: fault, blame, guilt, sin
Cinzia: colpa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: colpa [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cinzia: sosta [natural native speed]
Marco: stop, break, stop-off, stopover
Cinzia: sosta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: sosta [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cinzia: incidente [natural native speed]
Marco: accident, incident
Cinzia: incidente [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: incidente [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cinzia: rallentare [natural native speed]
Marco: to slow down, decelerate
Cinzia: rallentare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: rallentare [natural native speed]
: Next:
Cinzia: avere ragione [natural native speed]
Marco: to be right
Cinzia: avere ragione [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Cinzia: avere ragione [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Cinzia: mezzogiorno
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Ci vediamo a mezzogiorno.
Marco: I’ll see you at noon.
Cinzia: colpa
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Non è colpa mia.
Marco: It’s not my fault.
Cinzia: sosta
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Facciamo una sosta?
Marco: Shall we do a stopover?
Cinzia: incidente
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: C’è stato in incidente.
Marco: There’s been an accident.
Cinzia: rallentare
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Rallenta, stai andando troppo veloce.
Marco: Slow down, you are going too fast.
Cinzia: avere ragione
Marco: And the sample sentence is?
Cinzia: Hai ragione!
Marco: You are right!

Lesson focus

Cinzia: The condizionale passato
Marco: past conditional
Cinzia: is the compound form of the conditional mood and compared to the present conditional, it is used in a more limited way.
Marco: In type III if-clauses, the past conditional is employed in the main clause to express past occurrences that did not take place. And the reason for them not taking place is because the requirement contained in the subordinate clause had not been met. For instance
Cinzia: Se avesse prestato attenzione ai miei consigli, Luca non avrebbe perso il portafoglio.
Marco: If he had paid attention to my advices, Luca wouldn't have lost his wallet.
Cinzia: Se Lucia non avesse perso il treno, avrebbe potuto essere qui con noi.
Marco: If Lucia hadn't missed the train, she could have been here with us.
Cinzia: Se fosse stato più determinato, Antonio sarebbe riuscito a completare il lavoro.
Marco: If he had been more resolute, Antonio would have been able to finish the job.
Marco: As explained in previous lessons, the subordinate clause may be introduced by different prepositions, not just by se (if). For example
Cinzia: Con un po' di pazienza, avremmo potuto trovare i biglietti per il concerto.
Marco: (lit.)With a bit of patience, we could have found the tickets for the concert.
meaning
Cinzia: Se avessimo avuto un po' di pazienza, avremmo potuto trovare i biglietti per il concerto.
Marco: If we had been more patient, we could have found the tickets for the concert.
Cinzia: Avendo una macchina più veloce, saremmo arrivati prima.
Marco: (lit.) Having a faster car, we would have arrived earlier.
meaning
Cinzia: Se avessimo avuto una macchina più veloce, saremmo arrivati prima.
Marco: If we had had a faster car, we would have arrived earlier.
Cinzia: For more information on the different forms if-clauses can take, please refer to the appropriate lesson and grammar bank.

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today.
Marco: Before we go, we want to tell you about a way to drastically improve your pronunciation.
Cinzia: The voice recording tool...
Marco: Yes, the voice recording tool in the premium learning center...
Cinzia: Record your voice with a click of a button,
Marco: and then play it back just as easily.
Cinzia: So you record your voice, and then listen to it.
Marco: Compare it to the native speakers...
Cinzia: And adjust your pronunciation!
Marco: This will help you improve your pronunciation fast!
Marco: Ciao!
Cinzia: Ciao, ciao!

9 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 04:57 PM
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Grazie e ciao! :laughing:


Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Luca Deon
Wednesday at 05:09 AM
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Che bella lezione ancora!


Luca

Chiara
Friday at 05:27 PM
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Hi Jay,

I'm not sure I understand your question correctly.

If you are asking me whether the usage of avere and essere in the compound tense of past conditional is similar to the passato prossimo, the answer is yes. Verbs that require the auxiliary essere in the passato prossimo, require it in the past conditional too. Sono andato/a(passato prossimo), sarei andato/a (past conditional). It's the same for avere.

If this was not your question, would you mind rephrasing your question for me plaese? Or give me an example of what you'd like to understand better?

Thank you very much.

Chiara

Jay
Thursday at 01:05 PM
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Ciao, ho una domanda...


Using the past conditional, am I using the same idea of the passato prossimo tense where essere or avere precede the main conditional verb that's being understood? I'm sorry I can't recall being assured this is always the case...


Grazie mille e buona giornata!

Tha
Thursday at 03:58 PM
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GooD ...

TyH .. :cool:

Jeff
Tuesday at 11:44 PM
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Nevermind. I re-listened to some older episodes of the series and found the answer. Good old reflexitive verbs. :???:

Jeff
Thursday at 02:31 AM
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I really enjoy this podcast.


In this lesson, you gave the following example:

"Ci vediamo a mezzogiorno" as "I’ll see you at noon."


I'm really new to this but isn't that "We'll see you at noon" or am I just confused?


Thanks!

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Hello there, since my forum user name is "scarrafone" i'd thought it would be suitable to tell you that this lesson has the wrong category :smile: Since it is categorized as newbie lesson it never appears in my feed (okay, call me "pignolo" :grin:). P.S. there are not many comments here and in the forum. I hope that doesn't reflect the number of users and that there are enough active users to keep this Pod alive. I, for one, enjoy every lesson! Thx, Stefan

Marco
Monday at 05:22 PM
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Dear Stephan,

Thank you very much!

I hadn't noticed it!


The community seems to be rather happy just at listening Cinzia's voice! Although we'd like more comments.