Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Marco: Hello, and welcome to the Beginner Series S2 at ItalianPOD101.com, where we study modern Italian in a fun, educational format!
Consuelo: So, brush up on the Italian that you started learning long ago, or start learning today.
Marco: Thanks for being here with us for this lesson. Consuelo, what are we looking at in this lesson.
Marco: In this lesson, we will be studying Italian disjunctive conjunctions, delving into oppure.
Consuelo: This conversation takes place at Valeria's place.
Marco: The conversation is between Elena, Carlo, and Valeria.
Consuelo: The speakers are family and friends; therefore, they will be speaking informally.
Marco: Attention listners, comment,
Consuelo: comment,
Marco: and comment some more!
Consuelo: It's easy,
Marco: and asking questions really helps improve progress.
Marco: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Carlo: Eccoci!
Elena: Grazie Carlo. Allora tu cosa farai stasera?
Carlo: Stavo pensando di andare da Piero a vedermi la partita, oppure di affittare un film.
Elena: Valeria ha detto che puoi entrare a bere qualcosa se vuoi.
Carlo: Ok, grazie!
(entrano)
Valeria: Ciao ragazzi!
Carlo e Elena: Ciao Valeria.
Valeria: Preferite bere acqua oppure succo d'arancia?
Carlo: Succo d'arancia per me, grazie.
Elena: Io prendo l'acqua.
Valeria: Carlo, stasera rimani qui con noi?
Carlo: No, stavo pensando di andare da Piero a vedere la partita.
Valeria: Ah! Allora forse è meglio che ti sbrighi, o la perderai!
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Carlo: Eccoci!
Elena: Grazie Carlo. Allora tu cosa farai stasera?
Carlo: Stavo pensando di andare da Piero a vedermi la partita, oppure di affittare un film.
Elena: Valeria ha detto che puoi entrare a bere qualcosa se vuoi.
Carlo: Ok, grazie!
(entrano)
Valeria: Ciao ragazzi!
Carlo e Elena: Ciao Valeria.
Valeria: Preferite bere acqua oppure succo d'arancia?
Carlo: Succo d'arancia per me, grazie.
Elena: Io prendo l'acqua.
Valeria: Carlo, stasera rimani qui con noi?
Carlo: No, stavo pensando di andare da Piero a vedere la partita.
Valeria: Ah! Allora forse è meglio che ti sbrighi, o la perderai!
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Carlo: Eccoci!
Marco: Here we are!
Elena: Grazie Carlo. Allora tu cosa farai stasera?
Marco: Thanks, Carlo. So what will you do tonight?
Carlo: Stavo pensando di andare da Piero a vedermi la partita, oppure di affittare un film.
Marco: I was thinking of going to Piero's place to see the football match, or I could rent a movie.
Elena: Valeria ha detto che puoi entrare a bere qualcosa se vuoi.
Marco: Valeria said you can come in for a drink if you want.
Carlo: Ok, grazie!
Marco: Okay, thanks!
(entrano)
Marco(they enter)
Valeria: Ciao ragazzi!
Marco: Hi guys!
Carlo e Elena: Ciao Valeria.
Marco: Hi Valeria.
Valeria: Preferite bere acqua oppure succo d'arancia?
Marco: Would you like to have water or orange juice?
Carlo: Succo d'arancia per me, grazie.
Marco: Orange juice for me, thanks.
Elena: Io prendo l'acqua.
Marco: I'll have the water.
Valeria: Carlo, stasera rimani qui con noi?
Marco: Carlo, will you stay with us tonight?
Carlo: No, stavo pensando di andare da Piero a vedere la partita.
Marco: No, I was thinking of going to Piero's place to see the football match.
Valeria: Ah! Allora forse è meglio che ti sbrighi, o la perderai!
Marco: Ah! But maybe it is better for you to hurry up, otherwise you'll miss it!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: Do Italians love football, soccer, or in a more Italian way, calcio?
Cris: That is THE sport of excellence in Italy. Usually football matches are held every Saturday and Sunday in Italy.
Marco: And everyone's in front of the TV to support their favorite team if they cannot go to support them at the stadium.
Cris: Yes! There are renowned rivalries between famous teams. Rome and Lazio, Milan and Inter, and so on. So be careful to choose your friends well before deciding to see a match together!
Marco: Although not all Italians are fans of calcio, right?
Cris: Absolutely. Italians love so many sports it's difficult to keep track.
Marco: At the same time, soccer is the main topic of sports news, right?
Cris: Oh yes. Only during the Olympics or other big sporting events does calcio get less coverage.
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Consuelo: pensare [natural native speed]
Marco: to think, believe
Consuelo: pensare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: pensare [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: partita di calcio [natural native speed]
Marco: football match, game
Consuelo: partita di calcio [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: partita di calcio [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: affittare [natural native speed]
Marco: to let, rent
Consuelo: affittare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: affittare [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: succo d'arancia [natural native speed]
Marco: orange juice
Consuelo: succo d'arancia [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: succo d'arancia [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: sbrigarsi [natural native speed]
Marco: to hurry up, be quick
Consuelo: sbrigarsi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: sbrigarsi [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: perdere [natural native speed]
Marco: to lose, to waste, to miss
Consuelo: perdere [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: perdere [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Marco: Cristiano, what word are we going to see today?
Cris: Today we'll focus on the word "preferire."
Marco: "To like, to prefer."
Cris: Yes, Marco. This word is used in Italian when we make offers politely or when we want to accept them.
Marco: For example?
Cris: For example…"preferisco questo." Literally, this means "I'd rather have this," and in English, could be translated as well as "I like this."
Marco: And as an offer, we could say, "Cosa preferisci?"
Cris: Yes, "what do you like?"
Marco: Thanks Cristiano!

Lesson focus

The Focus of This Lesson Is "congiunzioni disgiuntive" ("Disjunctive Conjunctions")
Cris: Let's take a look at today's lesson.
Marco: Today we are going to continue with the study of the
Cris: congiunzioni disgiuntive
Marco: disjunctive conjunctions.
Marco: Similar to their English equivalents, the principal function of
Cris: "congiunzioni disgiuntive"
Marco: disjunctive conjunctions, consists in joining two or more phrases or words whose relation is mutually exclusive.
Cris: In other words, the employment of "congiunzioni disgiuntive" suggests that the truthfulness or applicability of one phrase automatically excludes the others.
Marco: The most important "congiunzioni disgiuntive" are the following
Cris: "o"
Marco: "or"
Cris: "ovvero"
Marco: "or"
Cris: "oppure," "altrimenti"
Marco: "or," "otherwise," "or else"
Cris: Today we will study the functioning of "oppure."
Marco: The disjunctive conjunction
Cris: "oppure,"
Marco: meaning "or," "alternatively," "rather," "on the other hand,"
serves to reinforce the mutually exclusive, oppositional meaning of "o" (which we studied in the previous class). For example…
Cris: "Preferite bere acqua oppure succo d'arancia?"
Marco: "Would you rather drink water or orange juice?"
Cris: "Prendiamo la tua macchina oppure la mia?"
Marco: "Shall we take my car or yours?"
Cris: "Potremmo fare un barbecue, oppure potremmo andare in pizzeria."
Marco: "We could have a barbecue; alternatively, we could go to a pizzeria."
Cris: When used in "if" clauses, "oppure" may also be substituted by "altrimenti"
Marco: "or else," "otherwise"
with the latter being more formal. For instance…
Cris: "Devi cominciare a studiare seriamente, in caso contrario non passerai l'esame."
Marco: "You need to start studying seriously; otherwise you won't pass the exam."
Meaning…
Cris: "A meno che tu non inizi a studiare seriamente, non passerai l'esame."
Marco: "Unless you start studying seriously, you won't pass the exam."
Cris: "Dovresti decidere cosa fare nella tua vita, in caso contrario non sarai mai felice."
Marco: "You should decide what to do in your life; otherwise you'll never be happy."
Meaning…
Cris: "Se non decidi cosa fare nella tua vita, non sarai mai felice."
Marco: "Unless you decide what to do in your life, you'll never be happy."
Cris: "Sbrigati, altrimenti perderai l'autobus!"
Marco: "Hurry up; otherwise you'll miss the bus!"
Meaning…
Cris: "Se non ti sbrighi, perderai l'autobus."
Marco: "If you don't hurry up, you'll miss the bus."

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today.
Marco: Now, don't forget to stop by ItalianPod101.com, and pick up the lesson notes.
Consuelo: It has the conversation transcript
Marco: vocab, sample sentences, a grammar explanation
Consuelo: and a cultural insight section.
Marco: Seeing the Italian
Consuelo: really helps you remember faster.
Marco: But don't take our word for it, please have a look for yourself!
Consuelo: And let us know what you think!
Marco: Arrivederci!
Consuelo: Ciao!

13 Comments

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Grace
Wednesday at 10:58 PM
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Ciao!

Voleva chiedere della differenza tra "vedere" e "vedermi" e eccola! Qualcuno l'ha gia' chiesto! Che fortuna!

Grazie Ofelia per la tua spiegazione! Adesso e' chiara.


A presto,

Grace

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 02:22 PM
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Hi Chris,


In this case, "vedere la partita" and "vedermi la partita" are synonyms.

Literally, they would translate into "to see the match" and "to see the match for myself/ for my own pleasure."


Sometimes the reflexive form (in this case "vedermi") can be used to express the emotional involvement of the subject in the action. This form is very common for the colloquial style.


I hope this helps!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Chris
Thursday at 09:35 PM
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Could you expand a little on the use of "vedere" and "verdermi" in this lesson?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 10:36 AM
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Ciao Jeanette Cook,


Grazie per la risposta! :smile:

Spero che il problema si risolva. I hope the issue gets solved.


Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Jeanette Cook
Thursday at 01:51 PM
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Thanks very much team. I will contact them.

Ciao -

Jeanette Cook

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 10:41 AM
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Buon giorno Jeanette Cook,


We couldn't reproduce the issue. If you experience it again, please send a mail to contactus@ItalianPod101.com, giving details about the lesson and the device you are using.


Your sentence is almost perfect, but you don't need "ho".

=> Vorrei un bevanda di succo d’arancia, oppure acqua, grazie.


Keep up the good work!:thumbsup:

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Jeanette Cook
Tuesday at 01:04 PM
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Buon giorno!


Grazie per questo lezione!


For the last couple of lessons, once the audio has finished, it immediately goes back and repeats. The same happens on the Review track. Could you fix that please?


Vorrei un bevanda di succo d'arancia, oppure ho acqua, grazie.

I would like a drink of orange juice, otherwise I will have water, thanks.


Ciao! ?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 12:24 PM
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Dear GreyWater,

It is correct both in an affirmative and interrogative sense.

Andiamo a vedere la partita. - Let's go see the match.

and

Andiamo a vedere la partita? - Shall we go see the match?


I hope I have answered your question. If I misunderstood and it is strictly with Gianluca's above comment, please let me know. He's the grammar expert! :roll:


Marco


ItalianPod101.com

GreyWater
Friday at 01:40 AM
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Would it be incorrect to say "Andiamo a vedere la partita" ?

Marco
Thursday at 07:16 PM
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Dear GreyWater,

Sorry for the inconvenience and thanks for spotting the typo. It's now been fixed.


Buona giornata.