Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Hello everyone! I'm Consuelo, and welcome to ItalianPOD101.com.
Marco: With us, you'll learn to speak Italian with fun and effective lessons.
Consuelo: We also provide you with cultural insights...
Marco: ...and tips you won't find in a textbook.
Marco: In this lesson, we will be studying Italian correlative conjunctions, delving into sia and ne'.
Consuelo: This conversation takes place at the bakery.
Marco: The conversation is between Elena and a customer.
Consuelo: The speakers are not friends; therefore, they will be speaking formally.
Marco: Basic and Premium members....
Consuelo: if you have a 3G phone...
Marco: you can see the Lesson Notes in your favorite browser on your phone!
Consuelo: Stop by ItalianPOD101.com to find out more.
Marco: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Elena: Ok Mario, ho spento il telefono!
Mario: Brava, così si fa! Ora concentrati sui clienti.
Cliente: (entra nel negozio) Buongiorno.
Elena: Buongiorno, come posso servirla?
Cliente: Mi servirebbe del pane per celiaci.
Elena: Abbiamo sia il pane alla soia che quello senza glutine, quale le do?
Cliente: Va bene, prendo entrambi, grazie.
Elena: Va bene, glieli incarto.
Cliente: Vorrei sia l'uno che l'altro in bustine separate, per favore.
Elena: Ecco a lei.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Elena: Ok Mario, ho spento il telefono!
Mario: Brava, così si fa! Ora concentrati sui clienti.
Cliente: (entra nel negozio) Buongiorno.
Elena: Buongiorno, come posso servirla?
Cliente: Mi servirebbe del pane per celiaci.
Elena: Abbiamo sia il pane alla soia che quello senza glutine, quale le do?
Cliente: Va bene, prendo entrambi, grazie.
Elena: Va bene, glieli incarto.
Cliente: Vorrei sia l'uno che l'altro in bustine separate, per favore.
Elena: Ecco a lei.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Elena: Ok Mario, ho spento il telefono!
Marco: Okay Mario, I've turned off the mobile!
Mario: Brava, così si fa! Ora concentrati sui clienti.
Marco: Good, well done! Now focus on the customers.
Cliente: (entra nel negozio) Buongiorno.
Marco: (entering the shop) Good morning.
Elena: Buongiorno, come posso servirla?
Marco: Good morning, how can I help you?
Cliente: Mi servirebbe del pane per celiaci.
Marco: I need some bread for celiacs.
Elena: Abbiamo sia il pane alla soia che quello senza glutine, quale le do?
Marco: We have both soy bread and gluten-free bread, which one do you like?
Cliente: Va bene, prendo entrambi, grazie.
Marco: Okay, I'll take both, thanks.
Elena: Va bene, glieli incarto.
Marco: All right, I'll wrap it up for you.
Cliente: Vorrei sia l'uno che l'altro in bustine separate, per favore.
Marco: I'd like to have both in separate wrappings, please.
Elena: Ecco a lei.
Marco: Here you go.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: Cristiano, in the dialogue we saw bread for celiacs. What is it?
Cris: Oh yes, is that particular bread for people intolerant to gluten.
Marco: Are there particular shops for that in Italy?
Cris: Oh no, most of the time you can find gluten-free bread in every bakery in town.
Marco: What about soy?
Cris: Lately products like soy, aloe, and stuff like that are getting really popular in Italy because of their dietetic properties.
Marco: I guess especially before summer, right?
Cris: Yeah, as everybody gets mad for the so-called "bikini test," starting around June.
Marco: Then I guess I'm too late for soy this year!
Cris: You're going to spend your summer in the office anyway.
Marco: Yes, but I'll be wearing my swimsuit!
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Consuelo: concentrarsi [natural native speed]
Marco: to focus, concentrate
Consuelo: concentrarsi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: concentrarsi [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: pane [natural native speed]
Marco: bread
Consuelo: pane [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: pane [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: celiaco [natural native speed]
Marco: celiac
Consuelo: celiaco [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: celiaco [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: glutine [natural native speed]
Marco: gluten
Consuelo: glutine [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: glutine [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: entrambi [natural native speed]
Marco: both (masculine plural)
Consuelo: entrambi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: entrambi [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: incartare [natural native speed]
Marco: to wrap, wrap up
Consuelo: incartare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: incartare [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Marco: What word are we analyzing today?
Cris: Today we'll focus on the word "entrambe."
Marco: It means "both," right?
Cris: Yes, but we have to notice that it has the ending "–e," therefore we will use it only for feminine nouns.
Marco: So the masculine will be "entrambi?"
Cris: Yes. In Italian, we have a more formal way to say "both," and that can be useful if you don't want to wind up searching for the right conjugation every time.
Marco: Oh, good! What's this word?
Cris: It's "ambedue."
Marco: "Ambedue," both for feminine and masculine. Cool, thanks!

Lesson focus

Cris: Let's take a look at today's grammar point.
Marco: Today we are going to continue with the study of the
Cris: "congiunzioni" coordinative correlative
Marco: coordinative correlative conjunctions
Marco: The coordinative correlative conjunctions are those conjunctions that join two (rarely more) words or phrases, thus relating each element in reciprocal terms.
Their meaning and usage are exactly the same as their English counterparts.
Cris: The congiunzioni correlative are always used in couple, unless they are part of peculiar expressions including adverbs or other conjunctions (which we will deal with in our higher-level courses).
Marco: In today's class, we will study two couples of "congiunzioni" correlative that convey opposite meanings.
Cris: Among the most frequently employed is the couple "sia…che/sia,"
Marco: "both…and"
Cris: …which joins two words or phrases expressing actions that are both possible.
Marco: Note that we can use either "che" or "sia" as the second conjunction
Cris: "Vorrei bere sia del vino bianco, che del vino rosso."
Marco: "I'd like to drink both red and white wine."
Cris: "Sia Marco che Michael volevano andare allo zoo."
Marco: "Both Marco and Michael wanted to go the zoo."
Cris: "Ero indeciso tra Twilight e Star Wars, poi ho deciso di guardare sia l'uno, sia l'altro."
Marco: "I was undecided between Twilight and Star Wars, then I decided to watch them both."
Marco: As regards the last sample sentence
Cris: "sia l'uno, sia l'altro"
Marco: it means "entrambi" ("them both"); we can use the pronoun "entrambi" since both terms (the movies' titles) had been previously mentioned.
Cris: The employment of "sia l'uno, sia l'altro" instead of "entrambi" achieves more elegant, stylistic results.
Marco: On the other hand, the couple "né…né" ("neither…nor") suggests that neither option (for words), nor action (for phrases) is possible. For instance...
Cris: "Non ho né studiato, né fatto la lavatrice."
Marco: Literally, "I have neither studied, nor done the laundry."
Cris: "Non posso mangiare né la pasta, né il riso."
Marco: "I can eat neither pasta, nor rice."
Cris: "Né dormire, né fare finta che non sia successo cambierà la situazione."
Marco: "Neither sleeping, nor pretending it didn't happen will change the situation."
Marco: Please note that first sample sentence may also be expressed through a similar grammatical form, which includes a negation of the main verb ("non," meaning "not") and the conjunction ("né," meaning "nor").
Cris: This alternative form may be used when negating the past participle of a verb. For example…
Cris: "Non ho studiato, né fatto la lavatrice."
Marco: "I haven't studied, nor done the laundry."

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today.
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Consuelo: Ciao!

12 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 01:08 PM
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Ciao Ken,


"sia...che..." are used to mean "both...and...", so (you are right) they are used when you have two options.

Adding to that, it's a very little difference, but, in this specific dialogue, using "sia...che" over "...e..." suggests the idea of a richer selection.

Anyway, the most important thing to remember is that you can use "sia...che..." to translate the English "both...and...".


I hope this helps :smile:

If you have more questions, feel free to post them!

Grazie,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Ken
Saturday at 11:49 AM
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Buongiorno Italianpod,


Could you clarify for me the usage of "sia" and "che" rather than using "e"? In a previous lesson you explained "e" (and) when combining many actions or nouns together. In this lesson the usage of "sia" and "che" I assume is used when there are only two options available, however could you also use "e" instead?


Ciao e grazie,


Ken.

Charlotte Farmer
Monday at 12:06 AM
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Thanks Ofelia - yes I get it now, that helps

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 04:14 PM
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Hi Charlotte,


Your translation is more literal and reflects better the Italian.

"Le = a Lei" means "to you" in formal Italian, so it's not related to "pane".

If it was not formal, it would be "Quale ti do?"


I hope this helps!

Grazie e ciao!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Charlotte Farmer
Thursday at 09:38 AM
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I don't understand the phrase "quale le do" translated as "which one do you like". To me it looks like "which ones (f.) do I give you, however, pane is masculine so shouldn't it be "li" or am I totally confused?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 04:49 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Ciao Joan,


Grazie per il commento. Thank you for the comment.

"Così si fa" is another way to say "ben fatto!", it literelly means "That's the way to do it!".

You can say it whenever in English you want to say "Well done!".

There is not a great difference between "Così si fa" and "Ben fatto!".:thumbsup:


I hope this helps!

A presto!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Joan Blench
Monday at 10:33 AM
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Can you please explain the phrase "così si fa" (second sentence of the dialogue)? I'm assuming the verb here is the reflexive "farsi" = to make for oneself. If I attempt to translate the phrase literally, it comes out like a Jean-Luc Picard statement: "it makes itself so." Is "così si fa" simply another way of saying "bene fatto" and if so, could you give me some examples of when I would use one or the other?

Grazie in anticipo,

Joan

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 10:59 PM
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Hi Luca!


Thank you for posting :)

In this case "glieli" means "them to You", because they are speaking formal Italian.

Normally it means "Them to him/her". It can also be "glielo" (it to him/her), "gliela" (it to him/her) and "gliele" (them to him/her)

"Compro un mela e gliela do'." >I buy an apple and give it to him.


I hope this helps!

Ciao-

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Luca Deon
Sunday at 11:24 PM
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Can someone explain glieli to me?

:)

Luca Deon
Sunday at 11:16 PM
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Sia 'Beginner Season 1' che 'Beginner Season 2' su questo sito web mi hanno aiutato!


Grazie e ciao!


Luca