Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lessonโ€™s Vocab Review List

Get this lessonโ€™s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

22 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
๐Ÿ˜„ ๐Ÿ˜ž ๐Ÿ˜ณ ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜’ ๐Ÿ˜Ž ๐Ÿ˜  ๐Ÿ˜† ๐Ÿ˜… ๐Ÿ˜œ ๐Ÿ˜‰ ๐Ÿ˜ญ ๐Ÿ˜‡ ๐Ÿ˜ด ๐Ÿ˜ฎ ๐Ÿ˜ˆ โค๏ธ๏ธ ๐Ÿ‘

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Here are a couple of links on Ferruccio Amendola one of the greatest Italian dubbers. http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0024582/ http://www.antoniogenna.net/doppiaggio/voci/vocifa.htm

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 03:57 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Rachel,


Yes, that's correct. It's an interjection we use while talking, similar to the English "well."

If you have more questions, let us know!


Grazie,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Rachel
Wednesday at 11:58 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

What does the be' mean in the dialogue?

Is that a common pause between words.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 02:57 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Michael,


Good catch! Yes, you can use "niente" to mean "no" in some cases. You can definitely say "Niente cibo" to mean "no food".


Grazie e a presto,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Michael
Friday at 05:07 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi,


Question on the opening phrase in the dialogue - "Niente sottotitoli?"


In Italian, 'niente' generally means 'nothing', but in this case it seems to mean 'no'. For example, could you say "Niente cibo?" to mean "no food?" ?


Grazie.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 04:47 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Rina,


Thank you very much for posting!

Yes, โ€œEffettivamente non so cosa dirLeโ€ is the formal version for "Actually, I don't know what to tell you."


Keep up the good work!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Rina
Saturday at 07:25 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Ciao tutti,

I like Italianpod101 very much. In fact your lessons are the best. Una domanda per cortesia. If I want to speak formal Italian should I say "Effettivamente non so cosa dirLe"?

Buona giornata,

Rina

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 08:42 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi C. Ofelt,


Thank you for posting.

The verb "sconoscere" exists, but in everyday life it's almost never used, except for the word "sconosciuto" (unknown person).

"Mai" is usually positioned after the verb. Also in the sentence "Sei mai stato a Roma", "mai" comes after the auxiliary verb "sei".

"Mai dire mai" is more an exception and it's also an idiom.

I hope this helps! If you have more questions, please let us know.


Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

C. Ofelt
Monday at 04:54 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Greetings!

In the Lesson Materials the last speaker is identified as "Sconosciuto" (unknown person). I cannot find a corresponding infinitive of the verb... "sconoscere". Does this verb exist?


Also, in the Lesson Notes, in the Gramar section states "Mai is an exception and we always position it after the verb. However, in the Sample Sentences above, the following appear: "Sei mai stato a Roma?" Also, "Mai dire mai". Which is correct regarding location placement of "mai"?

Thanks, and...

Keep smiling!

C. Ofelt

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 05:16 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi everyone,


Thank you for posting.


@Xenia, Thank you!:smile:


@Kandace, we couldn't spot the typo, where did you notice that?Thank you for your help!


Thank you,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Kandace
Tuesday at 06:21 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I noticed in the audio track as well as the lesson notes that popcorns is mentioned. In English we actually say popcorn (singular). Just a tip!