Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Hi, my name is Consuelo, and I am joined here by Marco.
Marco: Hello, everyone and welcome back to ItalianPOD101.com
Consuelo: What are we learning today?
Marco: In today's class, we will focus on the singular direct object pronouns.
Consuelo: This conversation takes place at Melissa's place.
Marco: It's between Melissa and her housemate Daniele.
Consuelo: They will be speaking informal Italian.
DIALOGUE
Melissa: Ah, sei sveglio, è molto tardi.
Daniele: Sto lavorando a un progetto. Lo devo finire per Lunedì. Sei stanca?
Melissa: Sì, sono andata in un posto che si chiama Caribe, lo conosci?
Daniele: No, non lo conosco. Io non vado mai a ballare. Con chi sei andata?
Melissa: Con Alessio. Sei proprio curioso.
Daniele: Sei sempre con questo Alessio, è il tuo ragazzo?
Melissa: No, è un mio collega di lavoro.
Daniele: Sì, sì, ho capito... Ah, è arrivata una cartolina dall'America per te.
Melissa: Bene, la leggo subito.
Daniele: Chi scrive?
Melissa: Tu non sei curioso sei impiccione!
Daniele: Ah ah, stai facendo progressi in italiano. Adesso lo parli proprio bene!
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Melissa: Ah, sei sveglio, è molto tardi.
Daniele: Sto lavorando a un progetto. Lo devo finire per Lunedì. Sei stanca?
Melissa: Sì, sono andata in un posto che si chiama Caribe, lo conosci?
Daniele: No, non lo conosco. Io non vado mai a ballare. Con chi sei andata?
Melissa: Con Alessio. Sei proprio curioso.
Daniele: Sei sempre con questo Alessio, è il tuo ragazzo?
Melissa: No, è un mio collega di lavoro.
Daniele: Sì, sì, ho capito... Ah, è arrivata una cartolina dall'America per te.
Melissa: Bene, la leggo subito.
Daniele: Chi scrive?
Melissa: Tu non sei curioso sei impiccione!
Daniele: Ah ah, stai facendo progressi in italiano. Adesso lo parli proprio bene!
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Melissa: Ah, sei sveglio, è molto tardi.
Marco: Ah, you're awake; it's very late.
Daniele: Sto lavorando a un progetto. Lo devo finire per Lunedì. Sei stanca?
Marco: I'm working on a project. I have to finish it by Monday. Are you tired?
Melissa: Sì, sono andata in un posto che si chiama Caribe, lo conosci?
Marco: Yes, I went to a place called Caribe; do you know it?
Daniele: No, non lo conosco. Io non vado mai a ballare. Con chi sei andata?
Marco: No, I don't know it. I never go dancing. With whom did you go?
Melissa: Con Alessio. Sei proprio curioso.
Marco: With Alessio. You're really curious.
Daniele: Sei sempre con questo Alessio, è il tuo ragazzo?
Marco: You're always with this Alessio; is he your boyfriend?
Melissa: No, è un mio collega di lavoro.
Marco: No, he's a colleague from work.
Daniele: Sì, sì, ho capito... Ah, è arrivata una cartolina dall'America per te.
Marco: Yes, I got it... Ah, a postcard from America arrived for you.
Melissa: Bene, la leggo subito.
Marco: Good, I'll read it immediately.
Daniele: Chi scrive?
Marco: Who's writing?
Melissa: Tu non sei curioso sei impiccione!
Marco: You're not curious, you're nosy!
Daniele: Ah ah, stai facendo progressi in italiano. Adesso lo parli proprio bene!
Marco: Ah ah, You're making progress in Italian. Now you speak it really well.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Consuelo: Melissa is talking to her housemate Daniele.
Marco: They live together; they might be friends because he's asking her about personal stuff.
Consuelo: This doesn't necessarily mean they're good friends. In Italy, people can be very sharp sometimes!
Marco: That's true, but it's also true that it's easy in Italy to build a close friendship with someone in a short time.
Consuelo: That's also true. I think that for a foreigner, it's a good experience to live in the same apartment with Italians.
Marco: Sure, they can give you many tips about the city—things that probably are not easy for a foreigner to understand.
Consuelo: And you can practice your Italian every day!
Marco: Another good point!
Consuelo: It can be really fun to share an apartment in Italy with your Italian friends!
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Consuelo: sveglio [natural native speed]
Marco: awake, clever
Consuelo: sveglio [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: sveglio [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: progetto [natural native speed]
Marco: project, plan
Consuelo: progetto [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: progetto [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: lunedì [natural native speed]
Marco: Monday
Consuelo: lunedì [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: lunedì [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: curioso [natural native speed]
Marco: curious
Consuelo: curioso [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: curioso [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: collega [natural native speed]
Marco: coworker
Consuelo: collega [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: collega [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: cartolina [natural native speed]
Marco: postcard
Consuelo: cartolina [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: cartolina [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: impiccione [natural native speed]
Marco: nosy
Consuelo: impiccione [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: impiccione [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: progresso [natural native speed]
Marco: progress, improvement
Consuelo: progresso [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: progresso [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Marco: Consuelo, what word are we studying today?
Consuelo: Today we're studying the words "curioso" and "impiccione."
Marco: "Curious" and "nosy."
Consuelo: As in English, the meaning is basically the same, but the usage is different.
Marco: "Curioso," which means "curious," is more formal. People and also animals can be "curiosi" about something.
Consuelo: By the way, "impiccione" implies an offensive meaning.
Marco: "Impiccione," which means "a nosy person," "is someone who likes to meddle in other peoples' affairs."
Consuelo: "A un impiccione piace impicciarsi degli affari degli altri."
Marco: Obviously, only human beings can be "impiccioni."
Consuelo: That's a human quality!
Marco: Is it a quality? Mmm… I don't think so…
Consuelo: Anyway, be careful when using this word with someone because he or she can be offended. I said can be—Daniele is not offended by Melissa because she's a friend.
Marco: But it is commonly used and you can hear it related to someone who's not present in that moment. Who are usually the "impiccioni in Italia?"
Consuelo: Ah, the neighbors, your mother-in-law, a shop's owner…
Marco: That's interesting, "Grazie," Consuelo!

Lesson focus

Consuelo: Let's take a look at today's grammar point.
Marco: In today's lesson, we are focusing on singular direct object pronouns.
Consuelo: Before we go any further, it is important to clarify what a direct object is.
Marco: A direct object is a word or a phrase that receives the action of a verb and answers the questions "What?" or "Whom?"
Consuelo: Take, for example, the phrase "Io compro il giornale."
Marco: "I buy the newspaper." What do I buy? The newspaper.
Consuelo: The newspaper is the direct object. Next is "I bambini chiamano la mamma."
Marco: "Kids call the mom." Whom do they call? The mom.
Consuelo: The mom is the direct object.
Marco: Direct object pronouns replace direct object nouns.
Consuelo: The form of the pronoun depends on the gender and the number of the noun it replaces.
Marco: Now we'll give you the singular forms.
Consuelo: Let's start with "mi."
Marco: In English, "me."
Consuelo: Then we have "ti."
Marco: "You."
Consuelo: Then we have "La" with an uppercase "-l."
Marco: This stands for "you," the courtesy form.
Consuelo: Next we have "lo."
Marco: That is both "it" and "him" and is masculine.
Consuelo: The last is "la."
Marco: Which is "her" and "it" and is feminine. Consuelo, let's try some examples now.
Consuelo: Okay, but please remember that a "pronome diretto," a "direct pronoun," precedes the verb.
Marco: And in a negative statement, it is placed between the noun and the verb.
Consuelo: Listen. "Compro il dizionario e lo uso."
Marco: "I buy the dictionary and I use it."
Consuelo: Marco, "Conosci questa cantante?" "Do you know this singer?"
Marco: "No, non la conosco." "No, I don't know her."
Consuelo: Here the direct object pronouns are "lo," referring to "il dizionario," and "la," which replaced "la cantante."
Marco: When combined with modal verbs like "dovere," meaning "must" or "have to"…
Consuelo: "Potere," meaning "can"…
Marco: And "volere," meaning "to want," the direct object pronoun may either be attached to the infinitive, which drops the final "-e"…
Consuelo: Or it may simply precede the conjugated verb.
Marco: For instance?
Consuelo: "Questo film è divertente, vorrei vederlo di nuovo."
Marco: "This movie is funny; I'd like to see it again."
Consuelo: "Non possiamo invitarla a cena."
Marco: "We can't invite her for dinner."
Consuelo: Here the direct object pronoun is attached to the infinitive. "Dov'è Roberto? Lo devo incontrare."
Marco: "Where is Roberto? I have to meet him."
Consuelo: "Questa borsa è carina, la voglio comprare."
Marco: "This purse is cute; I want to buy it."
Consuelo: Here the "pronome diretto" is placed right before the conjugated modal verb.

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today.
Consuelo: Listeners, can you understand Italian TV shows, movies or songs?
Marco: How about friends and loved ones? conversations in Italian?
Consuelo: If you want to know what's going on, we have a tool to help.
Marco: Line-by-line audio.
Consuelo: Listen to the lesson conversations Line-By-Line, and learn to understand natural Italian fast!
Marco: It's simple really.
Consuelo: With a click of a button, listen to each line of the conversation.
Marco: Listen again and again, and tune your ear to natural Italian.
Consuelo: Rapidly understand natural Italian with this powerful tool.
Marco: Find this feature on the lesson page under Premium Member resources at ItalianPod101.com.

5 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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ItalianPod101.com
Wednesday at 06:53 AM
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Hi Sue O'Meara


You're perfectly right, we don't usually capitalize the days of the weeks. That's probably just a small typo.


"To make progress" is usually translated with the set phrase "fare progressi" (with the plural). Generally speaking, we tend to use the plural when we want to say there have been steps forward in a process, while we use the singular when talking about the general idea of development (for example, "il progresso non si può fermare" = "progress cannot be stopped").


I hope this replies to your questions.

A presto!

Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com


Sue O'Meara
Tuesday at 04:46 AM
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Why is the L capitalized in Lunedi? I thought days of the week weren't capitalized.


In the last sentences, progressi is pluralized. How do you know when to use the plural versus the singular progresso?


Grazie

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 05:49 PM
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Hi Edmar,

sentences are good.

the second one could also be:

Mia moglie mi ha mandato una cartolina.

It depends if the wife sent the postcard once ( passato prossimo) or used to send postcards (many times: imperfetto).


a presto,

Chiara

Team ItalianPod101.com

Edmar
Tuesday at 01:01 AM
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Odio proprio le persone impiccione. I really hate nosy persons.


La mia moglie mi mandava una cartolina. My wife sent me a postcard.