Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Marco: Hello, and welcome to ItalianPOD101.com, the fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn Italian!
Consuelo: I'm Consuelo, and thanks again for being here with us for this Absolute Beginner S2 lesson.
Marco: In today's class, we will focus on reflexive verbs.
Consuelo: This conversation takes place in a swimming pool.
Marco: It's between Melissa and Ilaria.
Consuelo: They will be speaking informal Italian.
DIALOGUE
Ilaria: Nuoti molto bene, complimenti.
Melissa: Grazie, ma adesso sono stanchissima. E tu? Ti alleni tutti i giorni?
Ilaria: No, no. Vengo in piscina due volte al mese, nuoto, mi distraggo un po'.
Melissa: Fai bene. Quando torni in piscina dimmelo che veniamo insieme. Adesso però ho veramente fame.
Ilaria: Sei sempre la solita! Dai, adesso ci laviamo poi usciamo e cerchiamo un posto dove mangiare qualcosa.
Melissa: Sì, ho proprio bisogno di riprendere le energie!
Ilaria: Fuori adesso fa un po' fresco dobbiamo metterci la giacca.
Melissa: Vero. Andiamo a fare la doccia adesso.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Ilaria: Nuoti molto bene, complimenti.
Melissa: Grazie, ma adesso sono stanchissima. E tu? Ti alleni tutti i giorni?
Ilaria: No, no. Vengo in piscina due volte al mese, nuoto, mi distraggo un po'.
Melissa: Fai bene. Quando torni in piscina dimmelo che veniamo insieme. Adesso però ho veramente fame.
Ilaria: Sei sempre la solita! Dai, adesso ci laviamo poi usciamo e cerchiamo un posto dove mangiare qualcosa.
Melissa: Sì, ho proprio bisogno di riprendere le energie!
Ilaria: Fuori adesso fa un po' fresco dobbiamo metterci la giacca.
Melissa: Vero. Andiamo a fare la doccia adesso.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Ilaria: Nuoti molto bene, complimenti.
Marco: You swim very well, well done.
Melissa: Grazie, ma adesso sono stanchissima. E tu? Ti alleni tutti i giorni?
Marco: Thank you, but now I'm very tired. And you? Do you train every day?
Ilaria: No, no. Vengo in piscina due volte al mese, nuoto, mi distraggo un po'.
Marco: No. I come to the swimming pool twice a month. I swim and take my mind off things for a while.
Melissa: Fai bene. Quando torni in piscina dimmelo che veniamo insieme. Adesso però ho veramente fame.
Marco: That's good. When you come back to the swimming pool again, let me know. We can come together. But now I'm really hungry.
Ilaria: Sei sempre la solita! Dai, adesso ci laviamo poi usciamo e cerchiamo un posto dove mangiare qualcosa.
Marco: You're always the same! Come on, now we wash ourselves and then get out and find a place to eat something.
Melissa: Sì, ho proprio bisogno di riprendere le energie!
Marco: Yes, I really need to regain some energy!
Ilaria: Fuori adesso fa un po' fresco dobbiamo metterci la giacca.
Marco: It's a bit cool outside now; we must wear a jacket.
Melissa: Vero. Andiamo a fare la doccia adesso.
Marco: True. Let's go take a shower now.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Consuelo: Do you like swimming, Marco?
Marco: Oh yes, I really like "nuotare," but I never go to the swimming pool. I don't have much time.
Consuelo: I know what you mean. "Mi piace nuotare," meaning "I like swimming," but I find it more exciting in the sea. "Meglio al mare che in piscina."
Marco: "Better in the sea than in the pool," that's true. I like diving though. It's so much fun.
Consuelo: Wow, "complimenti!"
Marco: Okay, Consuelo, Italians often use this "complimenti," right?
Consuelo: Yes, the main translation is "congratulations," but it can also be used to replace phrases like "good job," "good effort," or "well done."
Marco: Now we know another word to be nice with people in Italy. "Grazie mille," Consuelo!
Consuelo: "Prego," Marco!
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Consuelo: nuotare [natural native speed]
Marco: to swim
Consuelo: nuotare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: nuotare [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: allenarsi [natural native speed]
Marco: to train, to work out
Consuelo: allenarsi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: allenarsi [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: mese [natural native speed]
Marco: month
Consuelo: mese [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: mese [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: distrarsi [natural native speed]
Marco: to be distracted
Consuelo: distrarsi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: distrarsi [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: solito [natural native speed]
Marco: same
Consuelo: solito [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: solito [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: lavarsi [natural native speed]
Marco: to wash oneself
Consuelo: lavarsi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: lavarsi [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: energia [natural native speed]
Marco: energy
Consuelo: energia [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: energia [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: doccia [natural native speed]
Marco: shower
Consuelo: doccia [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: doccia [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Marco: So consuelo, what expression are we studying today?
Consuelo: Today we're studying the expression "fare la doccia."
Marco: "To take/have a shower."
Consuelo: In English, you use different verbs for the word "doccia," meaning "shower," but in Italian we use "fare."
Marco: "To do" or "to make." Literally, it's "to make a shower." That sounds weird in English!
Consuelo: Yes, I know. Sometimes we also use the reflexive version of "fare."
Marco: You'll find an explanation about this later in the grammar section.
Consuelo: Anyway, the reflexive version of "fare" is "farsi." "Farsi la doccia."
Marco: And what's the difference?
Consuelo: I can tell there's no difference. You will hear someone say "faccio la doccia" or "mi faccio la doccia."
Marco: Actually, it is the same…both mean "you wash yourself." What about having a bath? How do you say it in Italian?
Consuelo: That is "fare il bagno" or "farsi il bagno."
Marco: Ah, you always use the verb "fare."
Consuelo: Yep!
Marco: This was very useful. "Grazie," Consuelo.

Lesson focus

Consuelo: Let's take a look at today's grammar point.
Marco: In today's lesson, we are focusing on reflexive verbs.
Consuelo: "I verbi riflessivi."
Marco: A "reflexive verb" is a transitive verb whose subject acts on itself.
Consuelo: In order to make a verb reflexive in Italian, it is necessary to drop the "-e" of the infinitive and add the reflexive pronoun "-si."
Marco: As a result, a verb like "lavare," meaning "to wash," becomes "lavarsi," meaning "to wash oneself."
Consuelo: The object of the action is indicated by "i pronomi riflessivi," "the reflexive pronouns."
Marco: Okay, those reflexive pronouns are…?
Consuelo: "Mi," "ti," "si," "ci," "vi," and "si."
Marco: The verb is normally conjugated according to the tense and the six persons.
Consuelo: As in "Io mi alzo."
Marco: "I get up." Obviously, the subject "io" can be omitted.
Consuelo: Usually, the reflexive pronoun precedes the verb.
Marco: Let's see an example with the verb "sposarsi," meaning "to get married."
Consuelo: "Domani mi sposo."
Marco: "Tomorrow I get married."
Consuelo: When a "verbo riflessivo" is combined with modal verbs, such as "potere," "dovere," or "volere"…
Marco: In this case, the position of the reflexive pronoun changes.
Consuelo: There are two possibilities.
Marco: It can be attached to the reflexive verb, which has dropped the final "-e." As in…
Consuelo: "Domani devo sposarmi."
Marco: Or it can normally precede the modal verb. For example?
Consuelo: "Domani mi devo sposare."
Marco: "Tomorrow I have to get married."
Consuelo: When the reflexive verb indicates an action that we do to things that belong to the subject, like body parts or personal objects, the possessive adjective is not used.
Marco: You should say "Mi lavo i piedi." "I wash (my) feet."
Consuelo: Exactly. You don't need to say "miei" since the reflexive pronoun "mi" indicates you are washing your own body.
Marco: In the dialogue, there are four examples of reflexive verbs.
Consuelo: The first is "Ti alleni?" a question referring to "tu," meaning "you."
Marco: "Do you train?" It comes from the verb "allenarsi," meaning "to train."
Consuelo: The second "verbo riflessivo" is one of my favorites, "distrarsi."
Marco: Ah ah, "to be distracted."
Consuelo: Yes, Marco, but it also means "to amuse oneself." As Ilaria says in the dialogue. "Mi distraggo un pò."
Marco: Ah true, "I take my mind off things."
Consuelo: The third reflexive verb we used is one of the most common.
Marco: It is one of the most common because everybody does it…that's "lavarsi."
Consuelo: "To wash oneself." Ilaria says "Ci laviamo."
Marco: "We wash ourselves."
Consuelo: We reached the fourth and last "verbo riflessivo" of our conversation.
Marco: That is "mettersi," meaning "to put on" or "to wear."
Consuelo: In this case, it is combined with the modal verb "dovere." "Dobbiamo metterci la giacca."
Marco: "We must," or "have to," "wear the jacket."
Consuelo: Dear listeners, this does it for today's grammar section.
Marco: We strongly recommend reading the lesson notes for this lesson.
Consuelo: You'll find a list with some of the most common reflexive verbs.

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today.
Consuelo: Listeners, can you understand Italian TV shows, movies or songs?
Marco: How about friends and loved ones? conversations in Italian?
Consuelo: If you want to know what's going on, we have a tool to help.
Marco: Line-by-line audio.
Consuelo: Listen to the lesson conversations Line-By-Line, and learn to understand natural Italian fast!
Marco: It's simple really.
Consuelo: With a click of a button, listen to each line of the conversation.
Marco: Listen again and again, and tune your ear to natural Italian.
Consuelo: Rapidly understand natural Italian with this powerful tool.
Marco: Find this feature on the lesson page under Premium Member resources at ItalianPod101.com.

9 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Grande lezione! Ho una domanda: Qual'è la differenza tra "solito" é "stesso"? Grammatically, useage, or otherwise. Grazie mille! :mrgreen:

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 11:11 AM
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Hi Glenn Asher,


Please check this video lesson: How do Reflexive Verbs Work?


I hope this helps!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Glenn Asher
Friday at 12:46 AM
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These reflexive verbs are so confusing to me.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 07:25 PM
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Hi Edmar,

perfect!!! well done!

Chiara

Team ItalianPod101.com

Edmar
Thursday at 01:58 PM
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Domani devo svegliarmi prima delle sei di mattina perche vado a Manila.

I must wake up before 6 am tomorrow because I am going to Manila.

Ken
Wednesday at 08:02 AM
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Chiara,

I appreciate your explanations and the time it takes to respond. Thanks.

Chiara
Tuesday at 03:43 PM
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Ciao Ken,

when you use the verbi riflessivi in the infinitive form you need to place the 'si' at the end of the verb. In this case the subject of the sentence is I so it becomes dirstarmi. Your first sentence is correct:'Nuoto per distrarmi'. The second sentence is not correct.

If the subject was you (' you swim to take your mind off things) it'd become:' Nuoti per distrarti'.

La preposizione 'per' va benissimo! Bravo!

Buono studio

Chiara

Ken
Wednesday at 04:44 AM
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Complimenti per la lezione. I verbi riflessivi sono molto difficili per me.


Ho notato nel dialogo: "Nuoto, mi distraggo un po'." (Translated: I swim and take my mind off things ...)


Se ho voluto dire: "I swim in order to take my mind off things...", potrei dire:"Io nuoto per distrarmi"? o "Io nuoto per mi distraggo"? Anche, è "per" la parola giusta?

Ruggero
Thursday at 10:59 AM
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Hi Jay,

Thanks for the question! They have a similar meaning and they are interchangeable in some cases, but it depends on context.


solito = usual/same/usually/generally

stesso = same/ self ( as in myself/yourself - io stesso/tustesso) / the same as or just the same as.


Some examples:

(at the bar) Pietro mi dai il solito = Peter can I have the usual - meaning can I have the usual drink


Di solito faccio colazione con un caffè = I usually take a coffee for breakfast


e' sempre la solita storia = its always the same story


e' sempre la stessa storia = its always the same story


io stesso non potevo crederci = I could believe it myself



Hope that helps you, cheers.