Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Hello everyone! I'm Consuelo, and welcome to ItalianPOD101.com.
Marco: With us, you'll learn to speak Italian with fun and effective lessons.
Consuelo: We also provide you with cultural insights...
Marco: ...and tips you won't find in a textbook.
Marco: In today's class, we will focus on the modal verb dovere, meaning "to have to" or "must."
Consuelo: This conversation takes place in a wine bar.
Marco: It's between Melissa and Alessio.
Consuelo: They will be speaking both formal and informal Italian.
DIALOGUE
Cameriere: Buongiorno signori, ecco la lista dei vini.
Melissa: Grazie, cosa ci consiglia?
Cameriere: Quì a Siena dovete assolutamente assaggiare la Vernaccia di San Gimignano.
Melissa: Ah si, vino bianco, prendiamo due bicchieri di quello e…
Alessio: Un tagliere di formaggi.
Cameriere: Bene, vi consiglio anche pane grigliato con salsa verde.
Melissa: Buonissimo, sì grazie.
(il cameriere lascia il tavolo)
Alessio: Melissa, non devi ordinare tutto quello che ti propongono!
Melissa: Va bene, allora la salsa verde la mangio solo io.
Alessio: Che furbetta!
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Cameriere: Buongiorno signori, ecco la lista dei vini.
Melissa: Grazie, cosa ci consiglia?
Cameriere: Quì a Siena dovete assolutamente assaggiare la Vernaccia di San Gimignano.
Melissa: Ah si, vino bianco, prendiamo due bicchieri di quello e…
Alessio: Un tagliere di formaggi.
Cameriere: Bene, vi consiglio anche pane grigliato con salsa verde.
Melissa: Buonissimo, sì grazie.
(il cameriere lascia il tavolo)
Alessio: Melissa, non devi ordinare tutto quello che ti propongono!
Melissa: Va bene, allora la salsa verde la mangio solo io.
Alessio: Che furbetta!
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Cameriere: Buongiorno signori, ecco la lista dei vini.
Marco: Good morning; here is the wine list.
Melissa: Grazie, cosa ci consiglia?
Marco: Thank you; what do you recommend?
Cameriere: Quì a Siena dovete assolutamente assaggiare la Vernaccia di San Gimignano.
Marco: Here in Siena, you absolutely have to taste the Vernaccia from San Gimignano.
Melissa: Ah si, vino bianco, prendiamo due bicchieri di quello e…
Marco: Oh yes, white wine, we'll take two glasses of that and…
Alessio: Un tagliere di formaggi.
Marco: A cutting board with cheese.
Cameriere: Bene, vi consiglio anche pane grigliato con salsa verde.
Marco: Well, I also suggest grilled bread with green sauce.
Melissa: Buonissimo, sì grazie.
Marco: Very good, yes, please.
(il cameriere lascia il tavolo)
Marco(The waiter leaves the table.)
Alessio: Melissa, non devi ordinare tutto quello che ti propongono!
Marco: Melissa, you don't need to order everything they suggest!
Melissa: Va bene, allora la salsa verde la mangio solo io.
Marco: Okay, then, I am the only one eating the green sauce.
Alessio: Che furbetta!
Marco: How clever!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Consuelo: Mmmm, "Vernaccia di San Gimignano, buono!"
Marco: Oh, that is a famous white wine produced in the area of Siena, right?
Consuelo: Exactly. San Gimignano is a small town near Siena. Marco, you seem like a real expert in Italian wines. Are you?
Marco: Oh no, I'm not. First of all, "I'm not a drinker!"
Consuelo: Eh eh, "non è un bevitore!"
Marco: There's one thing I don't remember very well. Why does Melissa order two glasses? Aren't we supposed to buy bottles at an "enoteca?"
Consuelo: Oh no, you don't have to. You can order a glass in addition to a bottle, which I strictly recommend because the wine has a better taste and it's cheaper.
Marco: "Grazie per il consiglio," "Thank you for your advice." What is "tagliere di formaggi?" "Formaggio" is "cheese," but "tagliere...?"
Consuelo: "Tagliere" literally means "cutting board"; you can find this word on the menu of an "enoteca" but also at a "ristorante." It is a wooden plate on which fresh food is served. It is used to recreate a domestic and rustic atmosphere.
Marco: Oh, I got it.
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Consuelo: lista [natural native speed]
Marco: list
Consuelo: lista [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: lista [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: assolutamente [natural native speed]
Marco: absolutely
Consuelo: assolutamente [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: assolutamente [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: assaggiare [natural native speed]
Marco: to taste, to sample, to nibble
Consuelo: assaggiare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: assaggiare [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: bianco [natural native speed]
Marco: white
Consuelo: bianco [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: bianco [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: tagliere [natural native speed]
Marco: chopping board
Consuelo: tagliere [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: tagliere [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: grigliato [natural native speed]
Marco: grilled
Consuelo: grigliato [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: grigliato [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: salsa verde [natural native speed]
Marco: green sauce
Consuelo: salsa verde [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: salsa verde [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: proporre [natural native speed]
Marco: to suggest, propose, advise
Consuelo: proporre [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: proporre [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Marco: Consuelo, what word are we studying today?
Consuelo: Today we're studying the verb "proporre."
Marco: "To suggest," "to propose," "to advise."
Consuelo: In the dialogue we have "consigliare" and "proporre." What's the difference, Marco?
Marco: Well, "consigliare" stands for "dare un consiglio," meaning "to give advice" or "to recommend." While "proporre," uh oh, "proporre" has the same meaning!
Consuelo: Yes, there's not a big difference in the meaning, but in the usage.
Marco: We use "proporre" when suggesting a plan, right?
Consuelo: Exactly. "Cosa proponi di fare?" "Dove proponi di andare?"
Marco: "What do you suggest doing?" "Where do you suggest going?"
Consuelo: We can say that "consigliare" something to someone is more heartfelt and recommended by the speaker, according to his experience.
Marco: Whereas "proporre" is used when we have an idea, but it doesn't necessarily mean that the person experienced what he or she is suggesting.
Consuelo: Good explanation, Marco, well done. There's only one thing I would add.
Marco: That is?
Consuelo: Please remember that the verb "proporre" is irregular.
Marco: Oh yes, good to know.
Consuelo: "Io propongo," "tu proponi," "lui propone," "noi proponiamo," "voi proponete," "loro propongono."
Marco: Thank you, but I "consiglio" to check up the conjugation in a dictionary!

Lesson focus

Consuelo: Let's take a look at today's grammar point.
Marco: In today's lesson, we are focusing on the modal verb…
Consuelo: "Dovere."
Marco: "To have to" or "must."
Consuelo: In the last lesson, we started talking about modal verbs by analyzing "potere," meaning "can."
Marco: Today we have "dovere," which expresses necessity or obligation.
Consuelo: Like the other modal verbs, it always precedes another verb, which is in the infinitive.
Marco: Let's hear some examples first.
Consuelo: Mamma told me so many times "devi pulire camera tua!"
Marco: "You must clean your room."
Consuelo: "Dobbiamo comprare una TV nuova."
Marco: "We have to buy a new TV."
Consuelo: "Stasera devo studiare."
Marco: "Tonight I have to study."
Consuelo: "Non dovete correre!"
Marco: "You don't have (need) to run!"
Consuelo: The past participle for the verb "dovere" is "dovuto," and in compound tenses it behaves exactly the same as "potere."
Marco: It mainly uses the auxiliary verb "avere," meaning "to have," but also "essere," meaning "to be."
Consuelo: We should use "essere" when the modal verb is followed by verbs of movement.
Marco: Such as?
Consuelo: "Andare," meaning "to go."
Marco: "Venire," meaning "to come."
Consuelo: "Salire," meaning "to get on."
Marco: "Scendere," meaning "to get off."
Consuelo: "Uscire," meaning "to go out."
Marco: And please remember that when the auxiliary is "essere," the past participle changes the ending according to the gender and number of the subject.
Consuelo: As in "Sono dovuta uscire presto oggi."
Marco: "I had to go out early today." Here it was "dovutA" because a girl was speaking.
Consuelo: "Sono dovuti scendere di fretta dal treno."
Marco: "They had to get off the train in a hurry." Here "sono dovutI" is referred to "loro," which is plural.
Consuelo: Now, we give you the conjugation of "dovere" at the "presente indicativo."
Marco: Okay, let's start.
Consuelo: "Io devo."
Marco: "I have to."
Consuelo: "Tu devi."
Marco: "You have to."
Consuelo: "Lui/lei deve."
Marco: "He/she/it has to."
Consuelo: "Noi dobbiamo."
Marco: "We have to."
Consuelo: "Voi dovete."
Marco: "You have to."
Consuelo: "Loro devono."
Marco: "They have to."

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today.
Consuelo: Listeners, can you understand Italian TV shows, movies or songs?
Marco: How about friends and loved ones? conversations in Italian?
Consuelo: If you want to know what's going on, we have a tool to help.
Marco: Line-by-line audio.
Consuelo: Listen to the lesson conversations Line-By-Line, and learn to understand natural Italian fast!
Marco: It's simple really.
Consuelo: With a click of a button, listen to each line of the conversation.
Marco: Listen again and again, and tune your ear to natural Italian.
Consuelo: Rapidly understand natural Italian with this powerful tool.
Marco: Find this feature on the lesson page under Premium Member resources at ItalianPod101.com.

16 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Do you like Italian wine?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 12:29 AM
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Ciao Carlos Saavedra

thanks for your feedback! ❤️️


Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 04:57 AM
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Hi Daniel, thanks for you question!


Use "piacciono" when the thing you are referring to is plural.


Mi piace la pallavolo = I like volleyball (singular)

Mi piacciono gli animali = I like animals (plural)


Thanks for studying with us!


Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

Carlos Saavedra
Monday at 04:37 AM
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Excelente ! El mejor curso y he buscado mucho.

10/10

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 10:57 PM
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Ciao Stephen,

grazie per il commento!

Don't hesitate to leave a comment if you have any doubts or questions.


Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

Daniel
Sunday at 07:36 PM
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I have a question for this example:

Mi piacciono le verdure grigliate


Why do we use piacciono instead of mi piace?


Thank you

Stephen
Thursday at 04:19 AM
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Grazie tanto. Ho capito benissimo.

Dio ti benedica

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 07:12 AM
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Ciao mehmet,

no, non è un errore. When the auxiliary is essere, the past participle changes the ending according to the gender and number of the subject. In that sentence, "sono dovuta" indicates that the speaker/writer is a woman. A man would say "sono dovuto".


Leave a comment if you have other questions!

Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

mehmet
Sunday at 01:09 AM
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nell'ultimo esempio, n. 1, è un piccolo errore per la parola "dovuta" invece della parola "dovuto"? Grazie

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 01:26 PM
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Ciao Tom and Karen,


Of course, you can also say: "allora mangio la salsa verde da sola," but in this case, Melissa wants to emphasize "la salsa verde" (object), by placing it in front of the verb "mangio." That's because Melissa wants Alessio to really crave for "la salsa verde" :laughing: more than the fact that she is going to eat alone.


Since Italian sentence order is usually Subject-Verb-Object, it becomes necessary to have the second "la," or it's not clear which is the object of "mangio." The second "la" is a pronoun and stands for "la salsa verde."


I hope this helps!

Thank you,

Ofelia


Team ItalianPod101.com

Tomaso
Friday at 04:25 AM
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Ciao tutti,


A question about the dialogue: In "Va bene, allora la salsa verde la mangio solo io" We don't understand the use of the "la" beofore "mangio" in this sentence. Given that she already said "la salsa verde" why would she need the second "la". Could she say "allora io mangio la salsa verde di solo"?


Grazie mille


Tom and Karen