Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Hi, my name is Consuelo, and I am joined here by Marco.
Marco: Hello, everyone and welcome back to ItalianPOD101.com
Consuelo: What are we learning today?
Marco: In today's class, we will focus on the plural direct object pronouns.
Consuelo: This conversation takes place on the hills of Firenze.
Marco: It's between Melissa and Ilaria.
Consuelo: They will be speaking informal Italian.
DIALOGUE
Ilaria: Hai avuto un'ottima idea. Mi piace andare in bicicletta.
Melissa: Avete delle bellissime colline in Toscana è un peccato non visitarle. Ci fermiamo qui per il picnic?
Ilaria: Sì, qui va bene. C'è ombra. Hai portato i panini?
Melissa: Certo, li ho presi. Poi ho una sorpresa.
Ilaria: Cosa, cosa? Ah, le fragole!
Melissa: Le adoro!
Ilaria: Anch'io. Ma, non abbiamo fazzoletti.
Melissa: No, eccoli.
Ilaria: Senti, chiamiamo i ragazzi? Possono raggiungerci forse.
Melissa: Perché no? Li puoi chiamare con il mio cellulare.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Ilaria: Hai avuto un'ottima idea. Mi piace andare in bicicletta.
Melissa: Avete delle bellissime colline in Toscana è un peccato non visitarle. Ci fermiamo qui per il picnic?
Ilaria: Sì, qui va bene. C'è ombra. Hai portato i panini?
Melissa: Certo, li ho presi. Poi ho una sorpresa.
Ilaria: Cosa, cosa? Ah, le fragole!
Melissa: Le adoro!
Ilaria: Anch'io. Ma, non abbiamo fazzoletti.
Melissa: No, eccoli.
Ilaria: Senti, chiamiamo i ragazzi? Possono raggiungerci forse.
Melissa: Perché no? Li puoi chiamare con il mio cellulare.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Ilaria: Hai avuto un'ottima idea. Mi piace andare in bicicletta.
Marco: You had a great idea. I like cycling.
Melissa: Avete delle bellissime colline in Toscana è un peccato non visitarle. Ci fermiamo qui per il picnic?
Marco: You have some beautiful hills in Tuscany; it's a pity not to visit them. Shall we stop here for the picnic?
Ilaria: Sì, qui va bene. C'è ombra. Hai portato i panini?
Marco: Yes, here it's okay. There is shade. Did you bring the sandwiches?
Melissa: Certo, li ho presi. Poi ho una sorpresa.
Marco: Sure, I took them. I have a surprise then.
Ilaria: Cosa, cosa? Ah, le fragole!
Marco: What? Oh, strawberries!
Melissa: Le adoro!
Marco: I adore them!
Ilaria: Anch'io. Ma, non abbiamo fazzoletti.
Marco: Me too. But we don't have tissues.
Melissa: No, eccoli.
Marco: No, here they are.
Ilaria: Senti, chiamiamo i ragazzi? Possono raggiungerci forse.
Marco: Listen, do we call the guys? Maybe they can join us.
Melissa: Perché no? Li puoi chiamare con il mio cellulare.
Marco: Why not? You can call them with my cell phone.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Consuelo: Do you like "andare in bicicletta," Marco?
Marco: Yes, I do. I like "riding a bicycle," but I've never been on Firenze's hills with mine.
Consuelo: You should go; from the hills surrounding Firenze you can enjoy a beautiful view!
Marco: And in this conversation, the girls are going to have a picnic.
Consuelo: And they eat "panini."
Marco: "Panini e fragole," which are "sandwiches and strawberries." Sounds good.
Consuelo: "Facciamo un picnic anche noi!"
Marco: "You want to have a picnic!" Okay, let's go. Cook something first and then we go.
Consuelo: No, no, "aspetta un minuto," which is "hold on a minute!"
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Consuelo: ottimo [natural native speed]
Marco: great, excellent, very good
Consuelo: ottimo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: ottimo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: bicicletta [natural native speed]
Marco: bicycle
Consuelo: bicicletta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: bicicletta [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: collina [natural native speed]
Marco: hill
Consuelo: collina [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: collina [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: visitare [natural native speed]
Marco: to visit
Consuelo: visitare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: visitare [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: fermarsi [natural native speed]
Marco: to stop
Consuelo: fermarsi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: fermarsi [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: fragola [natural native speed]
Marco: strawberry
Consuelo: fragola [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: fragola [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: fazzoletto [natural native speed]
Marco: tissue, hand cleaner
Consuelo: fazzoletto [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: fazzoletto [natural native speed]
: Next:
Consuelo: cellulare [natural native speed]
Marco: cellphone, mobile phone
Consuelo: cellulare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo: cellulare [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Marco: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Marco: Consuelo, what word are we studying today?
Consuelo: Today we're studying the verb "fermarsi."
Marco: "To stop."
Consuelo: In Italian this is a "verbo riflessivo," which is "a reflexive verb."
Marco: Those verbs that use "mi," "ti," "si," "ci," and so on.
Consuelo: Yes, in today's conversation, Melissa says "Ci fermiamo qui per il picnic?"
Marco: "Do we stop here for the picnic?"
Consuelo: Anyway, this verb is often used at the imperative. For example…
Marco: "You, stop!"
Consuelo: "Fermati!"
Marco: Is there any other particular usage?
Consuelo: Yes, we use this verb in the expression "Fermarsi a cena a casa di qualcuno."
Marco: "To stay for dinner at a friend's house."
Consuelo: If I ask you "Ti fermi a cena da me?" what does it mean?
Marco: It means "Are you staying at my place for dinner?" And the answer would be "Certo," which is "Sure!"
Consuelo: Oh, "grazie," Marco, that's very kind of you! What are you preparing? Ma te sai cucinare?

Lesson focus

Consuelo: Let's take a look at today's grammar point.
Marco: In today's lesson, we're focusing on the plural direct object pronouns.
Consuelo: In the last lesson, we covered singular direct object pronouns.
Marco: The "pronomi diretti plurali" are...
Consuelo: "Ci," meaning "us."
Marco: "Vi," meaning "you."
Consuelo: "Li" can be both "them" or the formal masculine version of "you."
Marco: Also, "le" can be them or be the formal, feminine "you."
Consuelo: In our dialogue, Melissa says "È un peccato non visitarle."
Marco: "It's a pity not to visit them."
Consuelo: Here "le," meaning "them," is the direct object pronoun feminine plural referred to "le colline."
Marco: "The hills."
Consuelo: Next, Melissa answers Ilaria by saying "li ho presi."
Marco: "I took them." In this case, "li" is the plural masculine.
Consuelo: "Li" stands for "i panini."
Marco: "The sandwiches."
Consuelo: Melissa also says "Le adoro."
Marco: "I love them" or "I adore them."
Consuelo: The pronoun "le" here is "le fragole."
Marco: "Strawberries."
Consuelo: A common usage of direct object pronouns is with the word "ecco."
Marco: Which in English is "Here I am!," "Here you are!," "Here he is!," and so on.
Consuelo: Pronouns are attached to the word "ecco." For example, when Melissa says "Eccoli!" in the dialogue.
Marco: "Here they are!" referring to tissues.
Consuelo: "I fazzoletti."
Marco: Sometimes direct object pronouns precede verbs that begin with a vowel…
Consuelo: Or those forms of the verb "avere" that begin with an "-h."
Marco: In these cases, drop the vowel while adding an apostrophe.
Consuelo: This is to symbolize in writing that the sound must be pronounced as one even though they are two words.
Marco: Please note that singular pronouns "lo" and "la" normally behave this way, while the plural pronouns "li" and "le" never do. Can we have some examples, Consuelo?
Consuelo: "Organizzi tu l'incontro?" "Are you organizing the meeting?"
Marco: "Sì l'organizzo io." "Yes, I'm organizing it."
Consuelo: Please pay attention, if I say "Marco ordina gli spaghetti?" "Does Marco order spaghetti?"
Marco: "Anch'io li ordino." "I order it too." This time, the pronoun did not lose the last vowel.
Consuelo: In the lesson notes, you will find some other useful tips about "pronomi diretti."
Marco: Yes, don't forget to look at the grammar section for this lesson!

Outro

Marco: That just about does it for today.
Marco: Attention perfectionists! You're about to learn how to perfect your pronunciation.
Consuelo: Lesson Review Audio Tracks.
Marco: Increase fluency and vocabulary fast with these short, effective audio tracks.
Consuelo: Super simple to use. Listen to the Italian word or phrase...
Marco: then repeat it out loud in a loud clear voice.
Consuelo: You'll speak with confidence knowing that you're speaking Italian like the locals.
Marco: Go to ItalianPod101.com, and download the Review Audio Tracks right on the lessons page today!

7 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Andiamo a fare un picnic?

ItalianPod101.com
Thursday at 03:41 PM
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Hi patrick kelly,


“li ho presi” is an exception to “ho preso”, because there’s the pronoun “li”, meaning “them”.

When there’s a third person pronoun (li, lo, la, le) you have always to change the past participle, even if the auxiliary verb is “avere”, “to have.”


I hope this helps!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

patrick kelly
Tuesday at 07:52 PM
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Melissa answers Ilania by saying ', li ho presi' why not li ho preso. I thought it was only with esser that the past participle changed. please explain


ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 11:25 AM
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Hello Edmar,


You're most welcome. Great to have you here!


Cheers,

Neha

Team ItalianPod101.com

Edmar
Thursday at 08:28 PM
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Grazie mille.

ItalianPod101.com
Thursday at 05:47 PM
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Hi Edmar,

in Italian the expression for picnic is 'fare un picnic'

Mi piace fare i picnic.


Chiara

Team ItalianPod101.com

Edmar
Tuesday at 01:16 AM
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Mi piace avere un picnic. I like having a picnic.