Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Ciao
Marco: Marco here. Absolute Beginner Season 1 Lesson 7: Italian Sandwiches Free to a Good Home.
Consuelo: Hello, everyone. I’m Consuelo and welcome to ItalianPod101.com.
Marco: With us, you learn to speak Italian with fun and effective lessons.
Consuelo: We also provide you with cultural insights…
Marco: And tips you won’t find in a textbook. In today’s class, we will focus on plural definite articles.
Consuelo: This conversation takes place in a little park.
Marco: The conversation is between Melissa and Alessio.
Consuelo: The speakers are friends, therefore, they will be speaking informally.
Marco: Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Melissa: Mmmm, buono!
Alessio: Sì, i panini del bar di fronte sono molto buoni.
Melissa: Eh sì. Il mio ha le olive, il tonno e i pomodori. E tu che panino hai?
Alessio: Il mio panino invece ha il prosciutto, la mozzarella e le melanzane.
Marco: Let’s hear it slowly now.
Melissa: Mmmm, buono!
Alessio: Sì, i panini del bar di fronte sono molto buoni.
Melissa: Eh sì. Il mio ha le olive, il tonno e i pomodori. E tu che panino hai?
Alessio: Il mio panino invece ha il prosciutto, la mozzarella e le melanzane.
Marco: And now, with the translation.
Melissa Mmmm, buono!
Marco Mmmm, good!
Alessio Sì, i panini del bar di fronte sono molto buoni.
Marco Yes, the sandwiches of the bar in front of here are very good.
Melissa Eh sì. Il mio ha le olive, il tonno e i pomodori. E tu che panino hai?
Marco Oh yes. Mine has olives, tuna, and tomatoes. And you, which sandwich do you have?
Alessio Il mio panino invece ha il prosciutto, la mozzarella e le melanzane.
Marco My sandwich has ham, mozzarella cheese, and eggplant instead.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: Consuelo, do Italians eat a lot of Panini for lunch?
Marco: Consuelo, do Italians eat a lot of "panini" for lunch?
Consuelo: Oh yes, Marco. Because they are very good, cheap, and quick to prepare! It is very normal in Italy to see people eating their sandwiches on the streets or on a bench for lunch but also during the afternoon.
Marco: That's true, and tourists have started to do the same actually.
Consuelo: Oh, you're right. My grandmother always said "there is nothing better than a 'panino' with cheese and a glass of red wine under the sun."
Marco: Wow, your grandmother is a wise woman.
Consuelo: That's for sure, but almost every Italian thinks exactly the same!
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is…
Consuelo panino [natural native speed]
Marco sandwich, panino
Consuelo panino [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo panino [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo molto [natural native speed]
Marco very, really
Consuelo molto [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo molto [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo oliva [natural native speed]
Marco olive
Consuelo oliva [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo oliva [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo pomodoro [natural native speed]
Marco tomato
Consuelo pomodoro [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo pomodoro [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo invece [natural native speed]
Marco instead
Consuelo invece [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo invece [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo melanzana [natural native speed]
Marco eggplant
Consuelo melanzana [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo melanzana [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Marco: Consuelo, what word are we studying today?
Consuelo: That's the Italian word "panino" and its plural form "panini." We'll also look at the word "bar."
Marco: A "panino" is the Italian sandwich.
Consuelo: As we have seen in the previous lesson, masculine nouns ending in "o" take the "i" in their plural form, and as we will see in this lesson's grammar point, the definite article to use is "i."
Marco: That's why Alessio says "i panini del bar."
Consuelo: "Bar" in Italian is a masculine noun; nouns ending in a consonant are usually masculine.
Marco: And which types of nouns end with a consonant in Italian?
Consuelo: Those are mostly words taken from English or other languages.
Marco: For example?
Consuelo: "Bar," "autobus," "film," "sport"…
Marco: I see, but how can I make the plural of those nouns?
Consuelo: In this case, you can't change the noun; you can only recognize it from the definite article. For instance, "bar" has only "i bar" as the plural form.
Marco: Ah okay, okay. And if I say "i bari?"
Consuelo: Oh no, that's a big mistake!!

Lesson focus

Consuelo: Let's take a look at today's grammar point.
Marco: The focus of this lesson is on plural definite articles.
Consuelo: As mentioned in our previous lesson, definite articles correspond to the English counterpart "the." Today we shall see the plural form.
Marco: There are basically three rules that help you to decide which plural article to use.
Consuelo: First rule.
Marco: Use "I" before masculine nouns starting with a consonant. For example…
Consuelo: "i ragazzi"
Marco: "the boys" and
Consuelo: "i panini"
Marco: "the sandwiches."
Consuelo: Second rule.
Marco: Use "gli" before masculine nouns starting with a vowel, the letter "-z," or the letter "-s" + a consonant. For instance…
Consuelo: "gli unicorni"
Marco: "the unicorns,"
Consuelo: "gli zerbini"
Marco: "the doormats," and
Consuelo: "gli scoiattoli"
Marco: "the squirrels."
Consuelo: Third rule.
Marco: Use "le" for every feminine noun, regardless of the starting letter. For example…
Consuelo: "le camicie"
Marco: "the shirts,"
Consuelo: "le unghie"
Marco: "the fingernails,"
Consuelo: "le zanzare"
Marco: "the mosquitoes," and
Consuelo: "le melanzane"
Marco: "the eggplants."
Marco: One difference between the Italian and English languages is that in Italian, we often employ "substantive adjectives," which are adjectives we use as stand-alone nouns.
Consuelo: Oh yes. We normally use substantive adjectives when we take one quality of the subject and make it become a temporary or permanent synonym of the subject we refer to.
Marco: Let me think of an example… Oh, I have an idea. Let's say we have a group of five people and only one of them has blond hair. We could say "il biondo," meaning "the blond one," since the context clarifies that we can identify just one person.
Consuelo: Exactly! And these adjectives follow all the grammatical rules concerning nouns, thus they can be masculine or feminine, singular or plural; they can be preceded by articles and so on.
Marco: That’s just about does it for today. Before we go, we want to tell you about a way to drastically improve your pronunciation.
Consuelo: The voice recording tool.
Marco: Yes, the voice recording tool in the premium learning center.
Consuelo: Record your voice with a click of a button.
Marco: And then play it back just as easily.
Consuelo: So you record your voice and then listen to it.
Marco: Compare it to the native speakers.
Consuelo: And adjust your pronunciation.
Marco: This will help you improve your pronunciation fast.

44 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 02:27 AM
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Hi sakkthi,

don't confuse "io" (meaning "I") with lo (meaning "the"). That's actually an L, not an "i".

Also, remember that the plural of "il" is "i", and the plural of "lo" is "gli".


Use LO and GLI when for masculine words starting with a vowel, a Z, an S+consonant.


il bambino = the baby -> i bambini = the babies

lo zaino = the rucksack -> gli zaini = the rucksacks


I hope that clears things up!


Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

her
Friday at 11:18 PM
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im confused, when its masculine plural before a consonant its GLI? i was pretty sure it was LO

could you plz explain it to me! thank you so much!

sakkthi
Sunday at 03:31 PM
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bungiorno,

I have small clarification. in the practice test 3 the last question is plural of “io studente”. I am a little confused here , because the plural of define article ‘il is gli’ and how can be applied to ‘io’.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 01:09 AM
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Hi Patricia,

yes, it's pronounced as in French.


Team ItalianPod101.com

Patricia
Monday at 12:44 PM
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The audio is quite fast in the vocab examples section.


I couldn't quite make out the Italian pronunciation of "chic". Is it the same as the French?


Grazie

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 12:29 AM
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Hi Nathaly Cristina,

thank you for pointing that out. We'll have the script edited ASAP.


Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

Nathaly Cristina
Monday at 05:38 AM
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Hi Italian POD 101 team,


I might say that script of the audio lesson is slightly different from the audio and it make it a bit hard to follow the speakers.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 05:00 AM
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Hi Heather,


I think it is a small misunderstanding. That sentence is actually spoken by two different speakers. Speaker 1 says "I'm hungry", Speaker 2 says "Instead, I'm thirsty".

While this may not sound very natural in English, it is works perfectly fine in Italian. We opted for the closest translation to Italian, just to show that you can use "invece" (instead) as shown.


Thanks for your feedback!


Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

Heather
Friday at 03:03 PM
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Italian sandwich free to a good home



Hi just reading the translation I'm hungry instead I'm thirsty. Could I suggest that Italian Pod 101 substitutes this translation. The reason I am suggesting this change is that we would never use this sentence in English.


Being hungry and thirsty are not a choice. I would like to offer this substitution. Would you like a ham panini or would prefer a cheese one instead.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:01 PM
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Hi Rosa,

we have a video with tips on how to roll your Rs. You can find it here:

https://www.italianpod101.com/lesson/ultimate-italian-pronunciation-guide-7-new-consonants-2/?lp=87


Hope it helps!

Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com