Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Ciao
Marco: Marco here! Absolute Beginner Season 1, Lesson 23 – Don’t Worry About Your Future in Italy. Hello and welcome to ItalianPod101.com where we study modern Italian in a fun educational format.
Consuelo: So brush up on the Italian that you started learning long ago or start learning today.
Marco: Thanks for being here with us for this lesson. Consuelo, what are we looking at in this lesson?
Consuelo: In today’s class, we will focus on the futuro semplice of the first conjugation -are verbs.
Marco: This conversation takes place in the car.
Consuelo: It’s between Alessio and Melissa.
Marco: The speakers are friends; therefore, they will be speaking informally. Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Alessio: Hai le scarpe adatte? Oggi cammineremo tanto.
Melissa: Sì, non ti preoccupare... Posso accendere la radio?
Alessio: Certo! Ah ecco il meteo! Bene, oggi bel tempo!
Melissa: Dove incontriamo Ilaria e Alberto?
Alessio: Cosa? Vengono anche loro?!
Melissa: Sì, Ilaria mi ha mandato un messaggio stamattina.
(bi-bip)
Alessio: Ecco il messaggio di Ilaria!
Marco: Let’s hear it slowly now.
Alessio: Hai le scarpe adatte? Oggi cammineremo tanto.
Melissa: Sì, non ti preoccupare... Posso accendere la radio?
Alessio: Certo! Ah ecco il meteo! Bene, oggi bel tempo!
Melissa: Dove incontriamo Ilaria e Alberto?
Alessio: Cosa? Vengono anche loro?!
Melissa: Sì, Ilaria mi ha mandato un messaggio stamattina.
(bi-bip)
Alessio: Ecco il messaggio di Ilaria!
Marco: And now with the translation.
Alessio Hai le scarpe adatte? Oggi cammineremo tanto.
Marco Do you have suitable shoes? Today we'll walk a lot.
Melissa Sì, non ti preoccupare... Posso accendere la radio?
Marco Yes, don't worry… Can I turn the radio on?
Alessio Certo! Ah ecco il meteo! Bene, oggi bel tempo!
Marco Sure! Ah, here is the weather forecast! Fine, today nice weather!
Melissa Dove incontriamo Ilaria e Alberto?
Marco Where do we meet with Ilaria and Alberto?
Alessio Cosa? Vengono anche loro?!
Marco What? Are they coming too?!
Melissa Sì, Ilaria mi ha mandato un messaggio stamattina.
Marco Yes, Ilaria sent me a message this morning.
(bi-bip)
Marco (bi-bip)
Alessio Ecco il messaggio di Ilaria!
Marco Ah, here is Ilaria's message!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Consuelo: Marco, do you know what is a "messaggio?"
Marco: I'm not sure, I was just wondering whether it is an e-mail or not…
Consuelo: When you hear Italians talking about messages of mobiles, they mean "sms."
Marco: Ah, the short message system!
Consuelo: Most of the mobile companies in Italy do not provide an e-mail system, unless you want to pay more.
Marco: I see, so you call them "messaggio."
Consuelo: Yes, or "esse, emme, esse." That's the way we spell "SMS."
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is…
Consuelo adatto [natural native speed]
Marco suitable, fit, proper
Consuelo adatto [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo adatto [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo potere [natural native speed]
Marco to be able, can
Consuelo potere [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo potere [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo meteo [natural native speed]
Marco weather forecast
Consuelo meteo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo meteo [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo incontrare [natural native speed]
Marco to meet
Consuelo incontrare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo incontrare [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo mandare [natural native speed]
Marco to send
Consuelo mandare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo mandare [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo messaggio [natural native speed]
Marco message
Consuelo messaggio [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo messaggio [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Marco: Consuelo, what expression are we studying today?
Consuelo: The Italian expression "non ti preoccupare."
Marco: "Don't worry!"
Consuelo: Since the verb is inflected in "tu"…
Marco: Italian for "you"…
Consuelo: We should use this phrase only with friends and people with whom we are well acquainted.
Marco: Melissa says "non ti preoccupare" to Alessio in the dialogue.
Consuelo: Yes, since he is an Italian gentleman, he is worried about Melissa's feet!
Marco: Uh huh, an Italian gentleman? I see. In what situation can we use it?
Consuelo: "Non ti preoccupare" works exactly as its English equivalent, "don't worry."
Marco: So, for example, "don't worry about me" should be…
Consuelo: "Non ti preoccupare per me."
Marco: Thank you, Consuelo, that's useful!

Lesson focus

Consuelo: Let's take a look at today's grammar point.
Marco: In today's lesson, we will see the "futuro semplice" tense of first conjugation "-are" verbs.
Consuelo: The "futuro semplice" corresponds in English to the simple future tense.
Marco: It is used to describe future actions, expressing the idea of "to be going to" or "will," since there is no difference in Italian between planned or unplanned future actions. Consuelo, what is the procedure to conjugate verbs into "futuro" tense?
Consuelo: That's very simple. To form the "futuro" of regular verbs, we drop the final "-e" of the infinitive and add the endings "-ò," "-ai," "-à," "-emo," "-ete," and "-anno."
Marco: First conjugation "-are" verbs change the "-a" of the infinitive into "-e."
Consuelo: Take, for example, "portare," meaning "to bring." Change "-are" into "-ere," drop the final "-e," and add the appropriate ending.
Marco: Inflecting it with "io," meaning "I," it becomes…
Consuelo: "Io porterò," meaning "I will bring." Do you want other examples?
Marco: Yes, please.
Consuelo: "diventare"
Marco: "to become"
Consuelo: "Io diventerò"
Marco: "I will become"
Consuelo: Or..."arrivare."
Marco: "to arrive"
Consuelo: "Io arriverò"
Marco: "I will arrive."
Consuelo: In the dialogue, Alessio uses the verb "camminare."
Marco: "To walk." Why don't we see the conjugation of all six subjects?
Consuelo: Okay, let's start. "Io camminerò."
Marco: "I will walk."
Consuelo: "Tu camminerai."
Marco: "You will walk."
Consuelo: "Lui, lei camminerà."
Marco: "He/she will walk."
Consuelo: "Noi cammineremo."
Marco: "We will walk."
Consuelo: "Voi camminerete."
Marco: "You will walk."
Consuelo: "Loro cammineranno."
Marco: "They will walk."
Consuelo: Please remember that when we change the "-a" of the infinitive, verbs ending in "-ciare" and "-giare" drop the "-i" in order to keep the "ci" and "gi" sounds.
Marco: Since these are rules that concern the written language, for further details we advise you to look at our PDF version. Consuelo, do you have something to add?
Consuelo: Yes, just one thing, certain two-syllable irregular verbs keep the characteristic "–a" of the infinitive ending. For example, "dare."
Marco: "To give."
Consuelo: "Io darò," not "io derò," as it should be following the standard rule.
Marco: Could you give us other examples for these two-syllable verbs?
Consuelo: Okay, I'll always give the first singular person "io." "Fare."
Marco: "to do"
Consuelo: "Io farò"
Marco: "I will do"
Consuelo: "stare"
Marco: "to stay"
Consuelo: "Io starò"
Marco: "I will stay." That’s just about does it for today. Okay. Some of our listeners already know about the most powerful tool on ItalianPod101.com.
Consuelo: Line-by-line audio.
Marco: The perfect tool for rapidly improving listening comprehension.
Consuelo: By listening to lines of the conversation again and again.
Marco: Listen until every word and syllable becomes clear. Basically, we’d break down the dialogue into comprehensible bite size sentences.
Consuelo: You can try the line-by-line audio in the premium learning center at ItalianPod101.com.

8 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 08:39 AM
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Hi Glenn Asher, Hi Tanya,


Thank you for posting.

@Tanya, that is correct 👍

Please notice that "they" should be spelled as "loro."


A presto,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Tanya
Friday at 09:31 AM
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Ciao!


I'm studying conjugations and would like to double check my understanding of -are verbs (those with more than 2 syllables). Would the futuro semplice of "provare" (to try on) be as follows:

Io provero

Tu proverai

Lui/lei proveremo

Noi proverete

Logo proveranno


Grazie mille!

Glenn Asher
Saturday at 06:10 AM
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I share the feelings of Ken and Mei.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 04:56 PM
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Hi Antonette,


The formal form is "Non si preoccupi."

Buona giornata!


Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Antonette
Wednesday at 11:53 PM
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If "Non ti preoccupare" is only used informally, what is the formal form? "Non si...?"

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 12:34 PM
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Hi Diane,


Thank you for posting.

I checked the lesson and it sounds correct to me. Marco says "The speakers are friends; therefore, they will be speaking informally." Are you referring to something else?


Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Diane
Friday at 07:54 AM
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Just before the new lesson dialogue starts, one of you says that the conversation is between friends so it is 'informal' . This is not correct. It should be ' in informal', otherwise there is no difference between the two modes.