Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Ciao
Marco: Marco here. Absolute Beginner Session 1, Lesson 20 – I Haven’t Struck Yet in Italian. Hello and welcome back to ItalianPod101.com, the fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn Italian. I’m joined in the study by…
Consuelo: Hello, everyone. Consuelo here.
Marco: In today’s class, we will focus on the passato prossimo tense of essere and avere verbs.
Consuelo: This conversation takes place at the bar.
Marco: It’s been Alessio and Melissa.
Consuelo: The speakers are friends. Therefore, they will be speaking informally.
Marco: Let’s listen to their conversation.

Lesson conversation

Melissa: Alessio, grazie per il consiglio, questo spritz è molto buono.
Alessio: Ah, prego. Melissa, ieri non sei venuta a lavoro, va tutto bene?
Melissa: Sì, sono stata malata, ma niente di grave.
Alessio: Senti, perché non facciamo un giro in macchina domenica?
Melissa: Ah, domenica? Dove andiamo?
Alessio: Andiamo a Siena!
Melissa: A Siena?! Non ho mai avuto occasione di andarci!
Alessio: Perfetto!
Marco: Let’s hear it slowly now.
Melissa: Alessio, grazie per il consiglio, questo spritz è molto buono.
Alessio: Ah, prego. Melissa, ieri non sei venuta a lavoro, va tutto bene?
Melissa: Sì, sono stata malata, ma niente di grave.
Alessio: Senti, perché non facciamo un giro in macchina domenica?
Melissa: Ah, domenica? Dove andiamo?
Alessio: Andiamo a Siena!
Melissa: A Siena?! Non ho mai avuto occasione di andarci!
Alessio: Perfetto!
Marco: And now with the translation.
Melissa Alessio, grazie per il consiglio, questo spritz è molto buono.
Marco Alessio, thank you for the advice, this spritz is very good.
Alessio Ah, prego. Melissa, ieri non sei venuta a lavoro, va tutto bene?
Marco Ah, you're welcome. Melissa, yesterday you didn't come to work. Is everything all right?
Melissa Sì, sono stata malata, ma niente di grave.
Marco Yes, I've been sick, but nothing serious.
Alessio Senti, perché non facciamo un giro in macchina domenica?
Marco Listen, why don't we go for a drive on Sunday?
Melissa Ah, domenica? Dove andiamo?
Marco Ah, Sunday? Where do we go?
Alessio Andiamo a Siena!
Marco Let's go to Siena!
Melissa A Siena?! Non ho mai avuto occasione di andarci!
Marco To Siena?! I've never had the chance to go there!
Alessio Perfetto!
Marco Perfect!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: Siena is not far from Florence, right?
Consuelo: Siena is only seventy-five kilometers from Florence.
Marco: Kilometers? How many miles…?
Consuelo: Miles? We don't use them in Italy! This is an Italian podcast, let's do it the Italian way!
Marco: Okay, okay. Sorry…
Consuelo: I was saying that Siena is not far from Florence, roughly one hour by car.
Marco: I've heard the landscape is beautiful there!
Consuelo: Oh that's true! It's so romantic…
Marco: Romantic? With whom did you go there?
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is…
Consuelo consiglio [natural native speed]
Marco advice
Consuelo consiglio [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo consiglio [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo malato [natural native speed]
Marco sick, ill
Consuelo malato [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo malato [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo grave [natural native speed]
Marco serious, hard, heavy, harsh
Consuelo grave [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo grave [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo macchina [natural native speed]
Marco car
Consuelo macchina [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo macchina [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo occasione [natural native speed]
Marco chance, occasion
Consuelo occasione [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo occasione [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo perfetto [natural native speed]
Marco perfect
Consuelo perfetto [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo perfetto [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Marco: Consuelo, what expression are we studying today?
Consuelo: The Italian expression "fare un giro in macchina."
Marco: "To go for a drive."
Consuelo: "Macchina" is...
Marco: "Car!"
Consuelo: ...and "giro" is...
Marco: Wait a minute, "giro" is...
Consuelo: "Giro" literally means "round," but when it's associated with "car" or "bicycle," it means "a drive" or "a ride."
Marco: For example?
Consuelo: "Un giro in bicicletta."
Marco: Ah, "bicicletta" is "bicycle." "A ride!"
Consuelo: In Italian, we use the verb "fare."
Marco: "To do."
Consuelo: Whereas in English, we use the verb "andare."
Marco: "To go." Alessio in the dialogue says...
Consuelo: He says, "perché non facciamo un giro in macchina."
Marco: "Facciamo" referring to "noi," am I right?
Consuelo: Oh yes, you're right!

Lesson focus

Consuelo: Let's take a look at today's grammar point.
Marco: In today's lesson, we focus on the "passato prossimo" tense of the verb…
Consuelo: "essere"
Marco: "to be"
Consuelo: And "avere"
Marco: "to have."
Consuelo: How can we make the "passato prossimo" tense of a verb?
Marco: It's easy to remember. Let's say it again!
Consuelo: First, conjugate the auxiliary verb "essere" or "avere" in the present indicative…
Marco: And then please add the past participle of the main verb.
Consuelo: In today's class, the main verbs are the same "essere" and "avere."
Marco: What should we do?
Consuelo: Don't worry, Marco, the structure we've already explained does not change.
Marco: The verb "essere" always requires the auxiliary "essere" in the present indicative.
Consuelo: And its past participle is "stato." Why don't we see the full conjugation?
Marco: Good idea!
Consuelo: "Io sono stato/a."
Marco: "I have been" or "I was."
Consuelo: "Tu sei stato/a."
Marco: "You have been" or "you were."
Consuelo: "Lui/lei è stato/a."
Marco: "He/she/it has been" or "he/she/it was."
Consuelo: "Noi siamo stati/e."
Marco: "We have been" or "we were."
Consuelo: "Voi siete stati/e."
Marco: "You have been" or "you were."
Consuelo: "Loro sono stati/e."
Marco: "They have been" or "they were."
Consuelo: As you saw, the past participle "stato" has four different endings according to the gender and number of the subject.
Marco: Let's continue with "avere." How do you conjugate it in the "passato prossimo" tense?
Consuelo: It is easy. The "passato prossimo" of "avere" is formed by the present indicative of the verb "avere" and its past participle "avuto."
Marco: Do the endings change?
Consuelo: No, they don't. This is the rule. The past participle of all the verbs requiring the auxiliary "avere" never changes.
Marco: Let's now see the conjugation of the verb "avere."
Consuelo: "Io ho avuto."
Marco: "I have had" or "I had."
Consuelo: "Tu hai avuto."
Marco: "You have had" or "you had."
Consuelo: "Lui/lei ha avuto."
Marco: "He/she/it has had" or "he/she/it had."
Consuelo: "Noi abbiamo avuto."
Marco: "We have had" or "we had."
Consuelo: "Voi avete avuto."
Marco: "You have had" or "you had."
Consuelo: "Loro hanno avuto."
Marco: "They have had" or "they had." That’s just about Italian for today. Testing yourself is one of the most effective ways to learn.
Consuelo: That’s why we have three types of quizzes.
Marco: Vocabulary, grammar, and content specific.
Consuelo: Each quiz targets a specific skill.
Marco: And together, these quizzes will help you master several fundamental skills.
Consuelo: You can find them in the learning center at…
Marco: ItalianPod101.com.

5 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Listeners! Dove andate domenica? Where are you going on Sunday?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 05:48 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Steve hobmann,

thanks for your question. I know that in English when you're talking about "yesterday" you would use "I was sick". In Italian, on the other hand, it doesn't make much of a difference in this specific context. You could say both "ero malata" (I was sick) using the Imperfetto, or "sono stata malata" (I've been sick), using the "passato prossimo".

Because it may be confusing for beginners to see too many different tenses at once, I believe when first learning the "passato prossimo" it helps to just think about it as the English Present perfect (I've been).


You can learn more in this lesson: https://www.italianpod101.com/lesson/beginner-8-what-did-you-do-this-weekend-in-italy/?lp=61


I hope this helps!


Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

Steve hobmann
Thursday at 01:52 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

The dialog says Sì, sono stata malata , which I thought translates to I was but the translation shows I have been. Can you please clarify if I’m confused?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 07:08 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Eloise,


Thank you for your message.


If you have a free lifetime account, you can access the first 3 lessons of each series without cost.


Also, please check the Italian resources for more free content:

https://www.italianpod101.com/italian-resources/


There is also our YouTube channel for free videos:

https://www.youtube.com/user/italianpod101


In case you have any doubts, please let us know.


Cristiane

Team ItalianPod101.com

Eloise Eaton
Friday at 09:36 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

why do you keep sending me emails say I can listen for free and then I click on the link i can't! Its very frustrating!!!