Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Ciao
Marco: Marco here. Absolute Beginner Season 1, Lesson 18 – I Haven’t Been on Time in Italy Yet. Hello, and welcome to ItalianPod101.com, the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn Italian.
Consuelo: I’m Consuelo, and thanks again for being here with us for this Absolute Beginner Season 1 lesson.
Marco: In today’s class, we will focus on the passato prossimo tense of second conjugation -ere verbs.
Consuelo: This conversation takes place at Alessio and Melissa’s workplace.
Marco: It’s between Alessio, Ilaria, and Melissa.
Consuelo: The speakers are friends, therefore, they will be speaking informally.
Marco: Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Alessio: Ciao Ilaria, sei occupata?
Ilaria: No, no. Faccio solo delle fotocopie.
Alessio: Ah, senti, hai visto Melissa?
Ilaria: No, non ancora, strano, è sempre puntuale...
Alessio: Sì.. Voi siete molto amiche?
Ilaria: Mah, abbastanza... perché?
Alessio: Sai se lei ha il ragazzo?
(Melissa entra in ufficio.)
Melissa: Buongiorno!
Ilaria: (Rivolta a Alessio) ...come scusa?
Alessio: No, no, no, niente...
Marco: Let’s hear it slowly now.
Alessio: Ciao Ilaria, sei occupata?
Ilaria: No, no. Faccio solo delle fotocopie.
Alessio: Ah, senti, hai visto Melissa?
Ilaria: No, non ancora, strano, è sempre puntuale...
Alessio: Sì.. Voi siete molto amiche?
Ilaria: Mah, abbastanza... perché?
Alessio: Sai se lei ha il ragazzo?
(Melissa entra in ufficio.)
Melissa: Buongiorno!
Ilaria: (Rivolta a Alessio) ...come scusa?
Alessio: No, no, no, niente...
Marco: And now, with the translation.
Alessio Ciao Ilaria, sei occupata?
Marco Hi, Ilaria, are you busy?
Ilaria No, no. Faccio solo delle fotocopie.
Marco No. I'm only making some photocopies.
Alessio Ah, senti, hai visto Melissa?
Marco Ah, listen, have you seen Melissa?
Ilaria No, non ancora, strano, è sempre puntuale...
Marco No, not yet, it's strange, she's always on time...
Alessio Sì.. Voi siete molto amiche?
Marco Yes… Are you close friends?
Ilaria Mah, abbastanza... perché?
Marco Well, kind of... Why?
Alessio Sai se lei ha il ragazzo?
Marco Do you know whether she has a boyfriend?
(Melissa entra in ufficio.)
Marco(Melissa enters the office.)
Melissa Buongiorno!
Marco Good morning!
Ilaria (Rivolta a Alessio) ...come scusa?
Marco (talking to Alessio) ...Sorry, what?
Alessio No, no, no, niente...
Marco Oh, no, nothing...
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Consuelo: Eh eh eh. I knew Alessio was into Melissa…
Marco: Oh yes, it's apparent. Anyway, is it normal for Italians to repeat "sì" or "no" a couple of times?
Consuelo: Sure, it is a normal way of speaking in a conversation.
Marco: Okay, but how many times can I say "sì" or "no?" Ilaria said "no" twice, but Alessio said "no" three times!
Consuelo: We usually say it twice, but you may also hear someone say it three or four times.
Marco: What? That's funny!
Consuelo: Do you think? Please ask me some questions! Let's see…
Marco: Okay, Consuelo, "ti piace il vino?" "Do you like wine?"
Consuelo: "Sì, sì, certo!"
Marco: The next question is "ti piace il calcio?" "Do you like soccer?"
Consuelo: No, no, no, no...
Marco: Ah, ah, ah!!
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is…
Consuelo occupato [natural native speed]
Marco busy
Consuelo occupato [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo occupato [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo fotocopia [natural native speed]
Marco photocopy
Consuelo fotocopia [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo fotocopia [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo vedere [natural native speed]
Marco to look, to watch, to see
Consuelo vedere [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo vedere [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo puntuale [natural native speed]
Marco on time, punctual
Consuelo puntuale [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo puntuale [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo amico [natural native speed]
Marco friend
Consuelo amico [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo amico [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo abbastanza [natural native speed]
Marco enough, quite, fairly, rather
Consuelo abbastanza [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo abbastanza [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Marco: Consuelo, what word are we studying today?
Consuelo: The Italian word "puntuale."
Marco: "Punctual," "on time."
Consuelo: Italians are not known to be punctual people after all.
Marco: Uh huh, that's true.
Consuelo: …but "io sono puntuale."
Marco: Oh, I don't trust you.
Consuelo: Hey, I'm never late. In Italy, we use the common expression "puntuale come un orologio svizzero."
Marco: Ah okay, "punctual as a Swiss watch." Switzerland is famous for watches.
Consuelo: Exactly! And you, Marco, "sei puntuale?"
Marco: It depends…
Consuelo: What? It depends?! You're always late! You are the opposite of "puntuale," you are a "ritardatario."
Marco: Okay, okay, I have to be honest, "non sono puntuale."

Lesson focus

Consuelo: Let's take a look at today's grammar point.
Marco: In today's lesson, we focus on the "passato prossimo" tense of second conjugation "-ere" verbs.
Consuelo: The "passato prossimo" structure of second conjugation "-ere" verbs is the same as that of first conjugation "-are" verbs.
Marco: We should follow the same process to form it.
Consuelo: Do you remember? Take the auxiliary verb "essere" or "avere" conjugated at the present indicative…
Marco: and add the past participle of the main verb.
Consuelo: As we've said in previous lessons, it is better to check the main verb in a dictionary to find out its past participle and the appropriate auxiliary verb.
Marco: Now we give you some examples of the most common "-ere" verbs conjugated at the "passato prossimo" tense, inflecting just the first singular person "io."
Consuelo: We start with those verbs that require the auxiliary "essere." Are you ready?
Marco: Sure.
Consuelo: "Io sono sceso/a."
Marco: "I have got off" or "I got off."
Consuelo: "Io sono vissuto/a."
Marco: "I have lived" or "I lived."
Consuelo: "Io sono caduto/a."
Marco: "I have fallen" or "I fell." Let's continue with other verbs, this time the auxiliary is "avere"…
Consuelo: "Io ho scritto."
Marco: "I have written" or "I wrote."
Consuelo: "Io ho bevuto."
Marco: "I have drunk" or "I drank."
Consuelo: "Io ho preso."
Marco: "I have taken" or "I took."
Consuelo: During the conversation, Alessio uses one of the most-used "-ere" verbs, "vedere."
Marco: "To see" or "to watch." Oh yes, when he asks Ilaria…
Consuelo: "Hai visto Melissa?"
Marco: "Have you seen Melissa?" Okay, Consuelo, let's see the "passato prossimo" conjugation of this verb, this time inflecting all six persons.
Consuelo: "Io ho visto."
Marco: "I have seen" or "I saw."
Consuelo: "Tu hai visto."
Marco: "You have seen" or "you saw."
Consuelo: "Lui/lei ha visto."
Marco: "He/she has seen" or "he/she saw."
Consuelo: "Noi abbiamo visto."
Marco: "We have seen" or "we saw."
Consuelo: "Voi avete visto."
Marco: "You have seen" or "you saw."
Consuelo: "Loro hanno visto."
Marco: "They have seen" or "they saw."
Consuelo: When you need to use the negative form, just add "non" before the auxiliary verb.
Marco: For instance...
Consuelo: "Non ho visto Melissa."
Marco: "I haven't seen Melissa." That’s just about does it for today.
Consuelo: Ready to test what you just learned?
Marco: Make this lesson’s vocabulary stick by using lesson-specific flash cards in the learning center.
Consuelo: There is a reason everyone uses flashcards.
Marco: They work.
Consuelo: They really do help the memorization.
Marco: You can get the flashcards for this lesson at…
Consuelo: ItalianPod101.com.

7 Comments

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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 11:29 AM
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Ciao Fabio,


"ascoltare"="to listen" and "sentire"="to hear".


I hope this helps!:smile:

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Fabio
Tuesday at 10:52 PM
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CIao, Io ho una domanda. Qual'è la differenza tra ascoltare e sentire?

Hi, I have a question. Which is the difference between "ascoltare" and "sentire"?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 12:52 PM
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Ciao Luigi,


"Ah, senti, hai visto Melissa?" is correct.

Basically when the auxiliary verb is "avere" (in this case "hai"), the participle (in this case "visto") almost always ends in -o.

If you have more questions, feel free to post them!:smile:


Thank you,

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

luigi
Tuesday at 02:04 PM
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Should 'Ah, senti, hai visto Melissa' be 'Ah, senti, hai visti Melissa' ?

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 02:41 PM
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Ciao Masami!


1. "Buongiorno" can be written in both ways.

2. "Se" is used to introduce an indirect question, is similar to the English "whether".


I hope this helps!

Grazie mille!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Masami
Friday at 12:32 AM
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Ciao Marco e Consuelo,

Ho due domande.

1. Buongiorno o Buon giorno? Is "buongiorno" normally written in one word or two words?

2. In the sentence "Sai se lei ha il raggazo?" why do you need "se" ?

Grazie mille.

Masami