Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Consuelo: Ciao
Marco: Marco here. Absolute Beginner Season 1 Lesson 16 – That’s It, There’s No More Italian Ice Cream for You. Hello and welcome to the Absolute Beginner Season 1 at ItalianPod101.com where we study modern Italian in a fun educational format.
Consuelo: So brush up on the Italian that you started learning long ago or start learning today.
Marco: Thanks for being here with us for this lesson. Consuelo, what are we looking at in this lesson?
Consuelo: In today’s class, we will focus on the structures "c'e'," meaning "there is," and "ci sono," meaning "there are."
Marco: This conversation takes place on the street.
Consuelo: It’s between Melissa and Alessio.
Marco: The speakers are friends, therefore, they will be speaking informally. Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Alessio: Piazza della Signoria è bella, no?
Melissa: Eh, sì, una meraviglia, poi oggi con questo sole....
Alessio: Melissa, hai una macchia enorme di cioccolato sulla giacca!
Melissa: Oh no. E adesso?
Alessio: Aspetta, c'è una fontanella qui vicino. Puliamo la giacca con l'acqua, andiamo.
Melissa: Grazie, sei molto gentile. Brrr, ma quest'acqua è molto fredda!
Alessio: Ah ah ah, ci sono delle macchie anche sui tuoi jeans!
Melissa: Ma no! Che pasticcio.
Marco: Let’s hear it slowly now.
Alessio: Piazza della Signoria è bella, no?
Melissa: Eh, sì, una meraviglia, poi oggi con questo sole....
Alessio: Melissa, hai una macchia enorme di cioccolato sulla giacca!
Melissa: Oh no. E adesso?
Alessio: Aspetta, c'è una fontanella qui vicino. Puliamo la giacca con l'acqua, andiamo.
Melissa: Grazie, sei molto gentile. Brrr, ma quest'acqua è molto fredda!
Alessio: Ah ah ah, ci sono delle macchie anche sui tuoi jeans!
Melissa: Ma no! Che pasticcio.
Marco: And now, with the translation.
Eh, sì, una meraviglia, poi oggi con questo sole....
Marco Oh yes, it's wonderful, especially today with this sun....
Alessio Melissa, hai una macchia enorme di cioccolato sulla giacca!
Marco Melissa, you've got a huge chocolate stain on your jacket!
Melissa Oh no. E adesso?
Marco Oh no. What now?
Alessio Aspetta, c'è una fontanella qui vicino. Puliamo la giacca con l'acqua, andiamo.
Marco Wait, there's a drinking fountain near here. Let's clean the jacket with water. Let's go.
Melissa Grazie, sei molto gentile. Brrr, ma quest'acqua è molto fredda!
Marco Thank you, you're very kind. Brrr, this water is very cold!
Alessio Ah ah ah, ci sono delle macchie anche sui tuoi jeans!
Marco Ah ah ah, there are some stains even on your jeans!
Melissa Ma no! Che pasticcio.
Marco No! What a mess.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Marco: Consuelo, usually there are many drinking fountains in Italian cities, right?
Consuelo: Oh yes, you are totally right. Italians drink a lot of water actually. You know, drinking fountains were first built by Romans.
Marco: Ah, that's why in Rome there's one at almost every corner.
Consuelo: In a small city like Venice, we can count almost 122 drinking fountains.
Marco: Wow, that's a lot! Melissa and Alessio are in Florence; what about drinking fountains in Florence?
Consuelo: As in all the other cities in Italy, they are considered to be pieces of architecture, but in Florence they're seen as examples of Renaissance drinking fountains.
Marco: They're beautiful to see, and they are useful as well.
Consuelo: Especially in summer!
VOCAB LIST
Marco: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is…
Consuelo macchia [natural native speed]
Marco stain
Consuelo macchia [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo macchia [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo enorme [natural native speed]
Marco huge, enormous
Consuelo enorme [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo enorme [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo fontanella [natural native speed]
Marco drinking fountain
Consuelo fontanella [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo fontanella [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo pulire [natural native speed]
Marco to clean
Consuelo pulire [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo pulire [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo freddo [natural native speed]
Marco cold
Consuelo freddo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo freddo [natural native speed]
Next:
Consuelo pasticcio [natural native speed]
Marco mess, jam, trouble
Consuelo pasticcio [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Consuelo pasticcio [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Marco: Consuelo, what word are we studying today?
Consuelo: The Italian word "pasticcio."
Marco: "A mess."
Consuelo: As we've heard in the dialogue, Melissa says "che pasticcio."
Marco: Oh yes, because she stained both her jacket and jeans with the ice cream!
Consuelo: When someone makes a "pasticcio," meaning "a mess," he is called "pasticcione" in Italian.
Marco: And what if it is a woman?
Consuelo: In that case, she would be a "pasticciona."
Consuelo: So if "pasticcio" is "a mess," what is the meaning of the colloquial verb "pasticciare?"
Marco: That should be "make a mess," right?
Consuelo: Yes, it is so. We have other nice expressions using this word; for example, "mettersi nei pasticci," meaning
Marco: "get into trouble."
Consuelo: "Un bel pasticcio," meaning
Marco: "a nice mess."
Consuelo: "Essere in un pasticcio."
Marco: Oh, that's "to be in a pickle." "Grazie," Consuelo.
Consuelo: "Prego!"
Consuelo: Let's take a look at today's grammar point.
Marco: In today's lesson, we'll focus on the structures…
Consuelo: "C'è," meaning
Marco: "there is." And…
Consuelo: "Ci sono," meaning
Marco: "there are." As in English, "c'è" is used only with singular nouns. For example…
Consuelo: "C'è un gatto sul divano," meaning
Marco: "There is a cat on the sofa." Or…
Consuelo: "C'è qualcuno alla porta," meaning
Marco: "There is someone at the door."
Consuelo: "Ci sono," like its English equivalent, "there are," is used only with plural nouns.
Marco: For example?
Consuelo: "Ci sono dei regali sotto l'albero di Natale," meaning
Marco: "There are some presents under the Christmas tree." Or…
Consuelo: "Ci sono delle belle scarpe in vetrina," meaning
Marco: "There are some cute shoes in the shop window."
Consuelo: The negative form is conveyed with "non c'è" or "non ci sono."
Marco: So you just need to add "non" before "c'è" or "ci sono." For example…
Consuelo: "Non c'è più pane!" meaning
Marco: "There's no more bread!"
Consuelo: "Non ci sono problemi," meaning
Marco: "There are no problems."
Consuelo: You just need to add "non" to make the negation!
Marco: Please remember that in Italian, double negations don't nullify or cancel out each other. That's why "there is no one" is translated as…
Consuelo: "Non c'è nessuno."
Marco: And we translate "there is nothing" as…
Consuelo: "Non c'è niente."
Marco: "Non c'è niente" is often used when followed by the preposition "da" plus an infinitive. For instance…
Consuelo: "Non c'è niente da fare," meaning
Marco: "There is nothing to do." We can say also…
Consuelo: "Non c'è niente da bere," meaning
Marco: "There is nothing to drink." Or…
Consuelo: "Non c'è niente da dire," meaning
Marco: "There is nothing to say."
Consuelo: And so on…

Lesson focus

Marco: That’s just about does it for today. Before we go, we want to tell you about a way to drastically improve your pronunciation.
Consuelo: The voice recording tool.
Marco: Yes, the voice recording tool in the premium learning center.
Consuelo: Record your voice with a click of a button.
Marco: And then play it back just as easily.
Consuelo: So you record your voice and then listen to it.
Marco: Compare it to the native speakers.
Consuelo: And adjust your pronunciation.
Marco: This will help you improve your pronunciation fast.

17 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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I think there is a typo for the answer for the grammar question : Oggi ci sono sono notizie interessanti sul giornale.

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 09:26 PM
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Ciao Thamazgha,


The Voice Recorder tool can be used by clicking on the microphone icon next to any dialogue line or vocabulary word in our lessons.

Please note that these buttons are currently only accessible on our website and not yet on our mobile app, but our team is working hard on implementing it for our app as well.


A presto,

Levente

Team ItalianPod101.com

Thamazgha
Tuesday at 09:02 PM
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Ciao tutti, dove è " the voice recording toll"?

Grazie.😉

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 05:15 AM
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Ciao Julie,

de la Gracia -> dalla Grecia


We also use "pasticcio" to talk about some dishes (pasticcio di carne = meat pie) 😁


Thanks for leaving a comment, I didn't know about the Greek traditional dish!


Valentina

Team ItalianPod101.com

Julie
Sunday at 12:41 AM
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Buonasera a tutti!

Vengo de la Grecia!

Pasticcio in Greek it's a really nice and traditional dish! 😄 Very yummy!!

It was quite funny learning that in Italian means 'a mess'!


A presto!

Julie ❤️️

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 09:02 PM
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Ciao j,


Thank you for posting!


Let us know if you have any questions.



Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team ItalianPod101.com

g
Friday at 03:58 AM
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?

Norojika
Monday at 09:00 PM
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Ciao Ofelia,


grazie per le tue risposte. They help a lot!


Norojika

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 02:15 PM
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Hi Norojika,


The dictionary form is "pulire."

"Pulire" has also a reflexive version, "pulir-si", which means something like "to clean for oneself," "to clean one's own [something]," so "Pulisci-ti le scarpe" literally means "Clean/wipe your own shoes."


I hope this helps!

Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com

Norojika
Wednesday at 06:38 PM
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In the PDF, there is a sentence "Pulisciti le scarpe prima di entrare". Shouldn't it be either "Pulisci" or "Pulite"? I checked with a grammar site, but couldn't find the form "pulisciti".

ItalianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 12:34 PM
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Ciao Mei,


"enorme" means "huge", while "grande" is just "big" :thumbsup:


Ofelia

Team ItalianPod101.com